0

I'm using eBay's api and in its JSON responses it's including a lot of unnecessary arrays. I'm trying to remove those arrays using a regex but can't come up with the exact one required.

So far I've come up with \[[^\{\}]*\] which matches square brackets that do not contain curly braces

Actual:

"childCategoryHistogram": [
    {
        "categoryId": [
            "175673"
        ],
        "categoryName": [
            "Computer Components & Parts"
        ],
        "count": [
            "21"
        ]
    },
    {
        "categoryId": [
            "175672"
        ],
        "categoryName": [
            "Laptops & Netbooks"
        ],
        "count": [
            "9"
        ]
    }
]

Expected:

"childCategoryHistogram": [
    {
        "categoryId": "175673"          ],
        "categoryName": "Computer Components & Parts",
        "count": "21"
    },
    {
        "categoryId": "175672",
        "categoryName": "Laptops & Netbooks",
        "count": "9"
    }
]
3

A regex is the wrong tool for this job. Don't try to change the JSON text -- change the data structure it parses into.

def remove_empty_lists(item):
    if isinstance(item, list):
        if len(item) == 1:
            return remove_empty_lists(item[0])
        else:
            return [remove_empty_lists(n) for n in item]
    elif isinstance(item, dict):
        return {k: remove_empty_lists(v) for k, v in item.iteritems()}
    else:
        return item

...given a Python data structure created from your stated input, Does The Right Thing:

>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> pprint(content)
{'childCategoryHistogram': [{'categoryId': ['175673'],
                             'categoryName': ['Computer Components & Parts'],
                             'count': ['21']},
                            {'categoryId': ['175672'],
                             'categoryName': ['Laptops & Netbooks'],
                             'count': ['9']}]}
>>> pprint(remove_empty_lists(content))
{'childCategoryHistogram': [{'categoryId': '175673',
                             'categoryName': 'Computer Components & Parts',
                             'count': '21'},
                            {'categoryId': '175672',
                             'categoryName': 'Laptops & Netbooks',
                             'count': '9'}]}
  • I was thinking from a performance point of view, text manipulation would have been much less intensive than this – SomebodyOnEarth Jan 11 at 23:19
  • 1
    Compared to the CPU time needed for the parsing process altogether, a recursive-descent into the result isn't typically going to be all that expensive. And frankly, if you care so much about performance that you're willing to give up correctness and conceptual simplicity on its behalf, Python is probably the wrong language for your job altogether. – Charles Duffy Jan 11 at 23:39

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