1

I have this small program that keeps rewriting the same string

string a = "aRbFR";
string b = "LFaLb";
string str = "Fa";

for (; n < 50; ++n)
{
    for(Int64 i = 0; i < str.Length; ++i)
    {
        if (i < str.Length && str[(int)i] == 'a')
        {
            str = str.Remove((int)i, 1);
            str = str.Insert((int)i, a);
            i += a.Length;
        }

        if (i < str.Length && str[(int)i] == 'b')
        {
            str = str.Remove((int)i, 1);
            str = str.Insert((int)i, b);
            i += b.Length;
        }
    } 
}

Eg: n0 = "Fa", n1 = "FaRbFR", n2 = "FaRbFRRLFaLbFR"

Is this possible to multithread since I need to keep updating the same variable sequentially ? I thought I could make my str volatile, but I can't think of how it's going to function properly, since all threads would need to update the same variable.

How can I make this run in efficient time ? It was taking forever and the variable was still at a pretty low index n = 17

  • 4
    So, you have s(0) = "Fa". Then you have s(1) = F(s(0)), and more generally, s(n) = F(s(n-1)). How could you parallelize that, you can't do the next step until you have finished the current one. If it's slow, look into doing this with a StringBuilder. Doing string concatenations in a loop is almost always the wrong thing to do. – Flydog57 Jan 12 at 0:28
  • Yeah that's what I thought. I'll look into it – Greggz Jan 12 at 1:24
  • But I was using Remove and Insert. Does that uses concatenations ? – Greggz Jan 12 at 1:34
  • I assume you do not have petabytes of RAM, so, you would need alternative approach. What exactly do you need this for? – Antonín Lejsek Jan 12 at 4:43
  • The string class is immutable. if you change a string, the old one is garbage, and you point to a new string, whether it's inserts, removes or concatenations – Flydog57 Jan 12 at 4:47
2

Before looking at threading anything for performance, its best to refine your algorithm. It turns out, this is suited for a Stack as it just creates a tree and flattens it out. The time complexity drops dramatically.

Also note, as this is basically recursive and the data need grows exponentially, even a stack will run out memory at higher levels. you could potentially disk buffer this all though as it is a Stack.

Another issue was the allocations, so once against a Stack helps here, as it grows internally more efficiently as does the StringBuilder

Stack Version

public static string StackVersion(int levels, string input)
{

   var stack = new Stack<(int l, char c)>();

   void PushAllReverse(int l, string seq)
   {
      for (var index = seq.Length - 1; index >= 0; index--)
         stack.Push((l, seq[index]));
   }

   PushAllReverse(1, input);

   var sb = new StringBuilder();
   while (stack.Any())
   {
      // pop the next
      var val = stack.Pop();

      // limit the levels
      if (val.l < levels)
         // add to stack if needed
         if (val.c == 'a') PushAllReverse(val.l + 1, a);
         else if (val.c == 'b') PushAllReverse(val.l + 1, b);
         else sb.Append(val.c); // append the char
      else
         // level limit, just append
         if (val.c == 'a') sb.Append(a);
         else if (val.c == 'b') sb.Append(b);
         else sb.Append(val.c);
   }

   return sb.ToString();
}

Original

public static string OriginalVersion(int levels, string input)
{
   for (int n = 0; n < levels; n++)
   {
      for (var i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
      {
         if (i < input.Length && input[i] == 'a')
         {
            input = input.Remove(i, 1);
            input = input.Insert(i, a);
            i += a.Length;
         }

         if (i < input.Length && input[i] == 'b')
         {
            input = input.Remove(i, 1);
            input = input.Insert(i, b);
            i += b.Length;
         }
      }
   }

   return input;
}

Test Timings (iterations)

Stack : (5) 00:00:00.0000111
Orig  : (5) 00:00:00.0000105

Stack : (6) 00:00:00.0000228
Orig  : (6) 00:00:00.0000318

Stack : (7) 00:00:00.0000483
Orig  : (7) 00:00:00.0001065

Stack : (8) 00:00:00.0000621
Orig  : (8) 00:00:00.0003524

Stack : (9) 00:00:00.0001143
Orig  : (9) 00:00:00.0014589

Stack : (10) 00:00:00.0002284
Orig  : (10) 00:00:00.0022475

Stack : (11) 00:00:00.0003179
Orig  : (11) 00:00:00.0092901

Stack : (12) 00:00:00.0006805
Orig  : (12) 00:00:00.0222648

Stack : (13) 00:00:00.0013283
Orig  : (13) 00:00:00.0920365

Stack : (14) 00:00:00.0036728
Orig  : (14) 00:00:00.4287529

Stack : (15) 00:00:00.0056583
Orig  : (15) 00:00:01.5850379

Sample result 5 iterations (Because i got it wrong originally, i better put results)

Stack

FaRbFRRLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRLLFaLbFR

Original

FaRbFRRLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRRLFaRbFRLLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRRLFaLbFRLLFaRbFRLLFaLbFR
  • Thanks for your answer. It really is faster! But right when it was in level 50 it gave me out of memory exception! I need to complete the level 50. Any more Ideas ? – Greggz Jan 12 at 12:58
  • It breaks around 3,5GB of Memory. So I can't make the toString() call. – Greggz Jan 12 at 13:29
  • Maybe when I exit the method, the stack will be free and give me some more room for the program – Greggz Jan 12 at 13:31
  • The code does not work correctly for levels==0. I would not say it is a bug, but it is worth knowing. – Antonín Lejsek Jan 12 at 15:54
  • @Greggz .net has hard limits on the size of string, depending on 32 or 64 architecture – TheGeneral Jan 12 at 16:22
2

TheGeneral is right, that it is just traversing a tree. You do that with stack, but rather than explicit stack, my tool of first choise is implicit stack, aka recursion.

protected void makeA(int level, StringBuilder sb)
{
    if (level == 0)
    {
        sb.Append('a');
    }
    else
    {
        makeA(level - 1, sb);
        sb.Append("R");
        makeB(level - 1, sb);
        sb.Append("FR");
    }
}

protected void makeB(int level, StringBuilder sb)
{
    if (level == 0)
    {
        sb.Append('b');
    }
    else
    {
        sb.Append("LF");
        makeA(level - 1, sb);
        sb.Append("L");
        makeB(level - 1, sb);
    }
}

protected string makeString(int level)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.Append("F");
    makeA(level, sb);
    return sb.ToString();
}

The code is more simple and is also about five times faster than TheGeneral version. But it does not really matter. The string for 50 iterations would be just too big. Those two counts are equal:

double c1 = makeString(i).Count(c => c == 'a' || c == 'b');
double c2 = Math.Pow(2, i);

And 2^50 = 1125899906842624, that is 2.2PB just for those two characters (1 character si 2 bytes).

  • Yeah i can see how this is faster, however it does not deal with other combinations , upvote anyway nice work – TheGeneral Jan 12 at 16:20
  • So in your opinion is it impossible to calculate the whole "path" in my machine ? A .txt file with the whole path would be ~1TB right ? – Greggz Jan 12 at 17:03
  • It is possible to calculate it (estimated calculation time is about a year), but it is not possible to store it on typical computer. The file with the result would be several petabytes big. 1PB = 1000TB. The whole thing seems as a XY problem from the very beginning meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem – Antonín Lejsek Jan 12 at 17:33
  • It's not a XY problem. If you re familiarized with the problem, "F","R","L" are instructions that I need to follow to find the coordinates. And I need to read 10^12 "F" (steps). So I was trying to find a way to store the Info, which now I know it's impossible – Greggz Jan 12 at 22:35
  • Then I found out that there's an equation to the coordinates after doubling the value of steps. So I just calculated the value to 244140625 steps. And then used the equation 11 times until I reached 10^12 steps. – Greggz Jan 12 at 22:50

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