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In many of the answers that I found here were said the following words:

Global variables in a single translation unit (source file) are initialized in the order in which they are defined.

or

Within the same compilation unit the order is well defined: The same order as definition.

etc.

But where can I see these words in the standard of C++? I would like to get a one or few concrete paragraph's where such behavior is described. I can not find it myself, and I do not know who to ask.

  • eel.is/c++draft/#basic – Jesper Juhl Jan 12 at 12:43
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    I find it very difficult to believe no thread here cites this. In which case, this would be a clear duplicate, presumably along with many others linked to such a thread. Maybe someone needs to edit such canonical thread(s) to be more searchable... – underscore_d Jan 12 at 19:46
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6.6.3 Dynamic initialization of non-local variables [basic.start.dynamic]

  1. Dynamic initialization of a non-local variable with static storage duration is unordered if the variable is an implicitly or explicitly instantiated specialization, is partially-ordered if the variable is an inline variable that is not an implicitly or explicitly instantiated specialization, and otherwise is ordered. [ Note: An explicitly specialized non-inline static data member or variable template specialization has ordered initialization. — end note ]
  2. Dynamic initialization of non-local variables V and W with static storage duration are ordered as follows:
    • If V and W have ordered initialization and V is defined before W within a single translation unit, the initialization of V is sequenced before the initialization of W.
    • If V has partially-ordered initialization, W does not have unordered initialization, and V is defined before W in every translation unit in which W is defined, then
      • if the program starts a thread (4.7) other than the main thread (6.6.1), the initialization of V strongly happens before the initialization of W;
      • otherwise, the initialization of V is sequenced before the initialization of W.
    • Otherwise, if the program starts a thread other than the main thread before either V or W is initialized, it is unspecified in which threads the initializations of V and W occur; the initializations are unsequenced if they occur in the same thread.
    • Otherwise, the initializations of V and W are indeterminately sequenced.

Quoted from N4659, formatting adjusted to work with the markdown supported here.

For the exact definition of dynamic initialization, see the preceding subsesction 6.6.2 [basic.start.static].

  • My standard-seeking speed is not up to par. +1. – Quentin Jan 12 at 11:25
  • Thanks a lot, I think is that what I looking for :) – adziri Jan 12 at 11:29
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    For completeness wrt. the question's title, static linkage does not alter the initialization behaviour. – Quentin Jan 12 at 11:33
  • @Quentin for completeness, whether the rule described above apply to a variable that is statically initialized? Like int a; or int b = 5; ? – adziri Jan 12 at 19:40
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    @adziri well, "static initialization" amounts to "baked-in at compile time", so the question is whether static-initialized objects can refer to each other -- if not, then the order is irrelevant since they are independent. – Quentin 2 days ago

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