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Today I realised that I'm missing some important theory in JS. In our app written in TypeScript we have tones of constants (JSON objects) declared within their own modules that are imported and used elsewhere in the app. Those constants are generally quite big settings objects that have tones of properties (as well as some functions as properties).

While our app is growing, I started to worry about performance and optimisation. The idea that came into my head was to wrap each of those constants into a function returning the constant so that it's only loaded into memory once that function is called.

I'm not 100% sure that this is how it will work. Specifically, if I declare a function that defines a constant and returns it, what exactly will be in memory when I import that function? How will it be different from when I define a constant and import it straight away? Does it make sense to wrap such constants into functions?

At the moment, I assume that once I define a constant within a module scope it's loaded into memory once it's imported. Is it correct?

Please let me know if there's some better approach to handle this.

  • Everything that happens in JS happens in the memory. The real question you should be asking is whether heavy objects are duplicated at runtime depending on the export mode. In any case, I never saw anyone optimize his code in this fashion, so you're either on a path to a big mistake, or a pioneer! – Nino Filiu Jan 12 at 12:30
  • "to wrap each of those constants into a function returning the constant" that's exactly what your bundler is already doing. "At the moment, I assume that once I define a constant within a module scope it's loaded into memory once it's imported. Is it correct?" as you are not talking about JSON, but instead about JS, I'd assume that the Engine is parsing the entire bundle including all your modules and all your objects to ensure that this is valid code. The modules (functions) will definitely be loaded into memory, but I don't know how the engines deal with the function bodies. – Thomas Jan 12 at 12:47
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    @NinoFiliu, that's why I decided to ask this question. Not to make that "big mistake". And the question is more like - when would this constant be loaded into memory. As I understand, compiler only cares about declarations and not definitions. And as I understand, variable occupies space in JS memory only once it's defined. That's why I was thinking of postponing the definition of those huge constants to the time when they are actually needed. And garbage collected after. – Daniil Andreyevich Baunov Jan 12 at 12:51
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    "As I understand, compiler only cares about declarations and not definitions. And as I understand, variable occupies space in JS memory only once it's defined." Yes, but where does this definition come from? as I understand you, these Objects are not built, but defined, and this definition is JS code that has to be stored somewhere to be executed. – Thomas Jan 12 at 13:06
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    I don't talk about script files either; not directly, but the browser has to store the commands that describe what a function should do, and the constant values to use. And if it takes you many characters to describe what the function should do, then it's likely that it will also take the browser more memory to store this set of operations and values that describe the function body. We rarely think about the memory needed to store a function, and it is rarely a concern compared to even a single image loaded, but it is not free. That's what I'm talking about – Thomas Jan 12 at 14:25

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