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This question already has an answer here:

I have a file.txt with a lot of line inside such as::

blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_KO -entry scaffold_2731 -range 32270-32509-strand minus >> file.fst
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_lKO -entry scaffold_2781 -range 3230-3508-strand minus >> file.fst
etc.

And I would like replace all file.fst pattern by path/data/path/LO/file.txt

and then get:

blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_KO -entry scaffold_2731 -range 32270-32509-strand minus >> path/data/path/LO/file.txt
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_lKO -entry scaffold_2781 -range 3230-3508-strand minus >> path/data/path/LO/file.txt

etc.

It tried :

sed -i -e 's/file.fst/path/data/path/LO/file.txt/g' /path/path/file_script_recover_copie.txt

But it does not work, someone has a better idea? Thank you.

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Jan 12 at 13:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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If you are ok with awk then you could try following.

awk -v val="path/data/path/LO/file.txt" '{sub("file.fst",val)} 1' Input_file

Pass path's value to -v val variable of awk and then it should work.

With sed in case you want to keep delimiter as / itself then try following.(I am escaping \/ in sed solution so that it will NOT be considered as it is used for closing sed's block)

sed 's/file.fst/path\/data\/path\/LO\/file.txt/'  Input_file
2

Backup your file(s), and try this:

sed -i -e 's@file.fst@path/data/path/LO/file.txt@g' /path/path/file_script_recover_copie.txt

Eg:

$ cat file
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_KO -entry scaffold_2731 -range 32270-32509-strand minus >> file.fst
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_lKO -entry scaffold_2781 -range 3230-3508-strand minus >> file.fst
etc.

$ sed -e 's@file.fst@path/data/path/LO/file.txt@g' file
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_KO -entry scaffold_2731 -range 32270-32509-strand minus >> path/data/path/LO/file.txt
blastdbcmd -db /path/path/LO/db_lh/makedb_lKO -entry scaffold_2781 -range 3230-3508-strand minus >> path/data/path/LO/file.txt
etc.

The problem is because your replacement has / in it, where / also is your sed's s delimiter. But sed can use other characters as s's delimiter. So I changed it to @.
(You can use others too, so long they're in right places)

Another way is to escape /, by adding \before it, so inside s they become \/. (This applies to other special characters too, for example to use'you can put\'` inside.)

  • Just to add to this: the first character after the s defines the delimiter in the substitution expression, it doesn't have to be /. – eduffy Jan 12 at 12:04
  • It did work thank you :) so the @ allows to take into account the /// patterned right? – bewolf Jan 12 at 12:04
  • ok thank you :) – bewolf Jan 12 at 12:14
  • Kudos for your string of recent answers, but please refrain from answering questions which are obvious and clear duplicates. There's a good collection of shell scripting canonicals in the Stack Overflow bash tag info page. – tripleee Jan 12 at 13:08
  • @tripleee Okay, got it. Thanks for the link. – Tiw Jan 12 at 13:11

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