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In this question I asked about a function composition operator in Python. @Philip Tzou offered the following code, which does the job.

import functools

class Composable:

    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        functools.update_wrapper(self, func)

    def __matmul__(self, other):
        return lambda *args, **kw: self.func(other.func(*args, **kw))

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        return self.func(*args, **kw)

I added the following functions.

def __mul__(self, other):
    return lambda *args, **kw: self.func(other.func(*args, **kw))

def __gt__(self, other):
    return lambda *args, **kw: self.func(other.func(*args, **kw))

With these additions, one can use @, *, and > as operators to compose functions. For, example, one can write print((add1 @ add2)(5), (add1 * add2)(5), (add1 > add2)(5)) and get # 8 8 8. (PyCharm complains that a boolean isn't callable for (add1 > add2)(5). But it still ran.)

All along, though, I wanted to use . as a function composition operator. So I added

def __getattribute__(self, other):
    return lambda *args, **kw: self.func(other.func(*args, **kw))

(Note that this fouls up update_wrapper, which can be removed for the sake of this question.)

When I run print((add1 . add2)(5)) I get this error at runtime: AttributeError: 'str' object has no attribute 'func'. It turns out (apparently) that arguments to __getattribute__ are converted to strings before being passed to __getattribute__.

Is there a way around that conversion? Or am I misdiagnosing the problem, and some other approach will work?

  • 1
    other in __getattribute__ is the name of the attribute, it's not a binary operator like > or @. – jonrsharpe Jan 12 at 17:45
  • As you saw, . is reserved for accessing attributes and methods. But you may use ° which is more similar to the original operator, and will not create this problem. – FrenchMasterSword Jan 12 at 17:45
  • @FrenchMasterSword what is the magic method to implement that?! It's not a valid Python operator. – jonrsharpe Jan 12 at 17:46
  • Well it isn't a python operator ^^' – FrenchMasterSword Jan 12 at 17:47
  • @FrenchMasterSword so... how exactly is that a useful suggestion? Are you suggesting the OP writes their own version of the interpreter to handle that symbol as an operator? – jonrsharpe Jan 12 at 17:48
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I am actually unwilling to provide this answer. But you should know in certain circumstance you can use a dot "." notation even it is a primary. This solution only works for functions that can be access from globals():

import functools

class Composable:

    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        functools.update_wrapper(self, func)

    def __getattr__(self, othername):
        other = globals()[othername]
        return lambda *args, **kw: self.func(other.func(*args, **kw))

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        return self.func(*args, **kw)

To test:

@Composable
def add1(x):
    return x + 1

@Composable
def add2(x):
    return x + 2

print((add1.add2)(5))
# 8
  • Very weird. But thank you very much for going to the trouble of providing this information. – RussAbbott yesterday
  • This only works for globals in the module Composable is defined in. And while you could then start pulling out names from the stack, this still won’t give you full expression access; those would simply be syntax errors or parsed in the wrong order. – Martijn Pieters yesterday
  • @RussAbbott not sure why you think this weird? You have a string, and globals() is a dictionary of the module namespace mapping strings to objects. So yes, if you limit yourself to globals in the same module you can map attribute names to globals this way. That’s an indirect path, just don’t expect to have the same expressive freedom as you have with the hooks for binary operators. – Martijn Pieters yesterday
3

You can't have what you want. The . notation is not a binary operator, it is a primary, with only the value operand (the left-hand side of the .), and an identifier. Identifiers are strings of characters, not full-blown expressions that produce references to a value.

From the Attribute references section:

An attribute reference is a primary followed by a period and a name:

attributeref ::=  primary "." identifier

The primary must evaluate to an object of a type that supports attribute references, which most objects do. This object is then asked to produce the attribute whose name is the identifier.

So when compiling, Python parses identifier as a string value, not as an expression (which is what you get for operands to operators). The __getattribute__ hook (and any of the other attribute access hooks) only has to deal with strings. There is no way around this; the dynamic attribute access function getattr() strictly enforces that name must be a string:

>>> getattr(object(), 42)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: getattr(): attribute name must be string

If you want to use syntax to compose two objects, you are limited to binary operators, so expressions that take two operands, and only those that have hooks (the boolean and and or operators do not have hooks because they evaluate lazily, is and is not do not have hooks because they operate on object identity, not object values).

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