1

I've deserialized JSON into a c# object, but with an incomplete JSON such that some properties are missing. At the time of deserializing the object, I don't have access to the full JSON. I can get the full JSON by making another API call, but I don't want to make that call if I don't have to.

I would like my property getters to work such that they return the property if it's not null. If it is null, it should make the call to the API to get the full JSON and update all of the JsonProperties in the class, and then return the property I've asked for.

public class Car
{
    private string _make;
    private string _model;

    [JsonProperty("make")]
    public string Make
    {
        get
        {
            if (_make != null)
            {
                return _make;
            }
            else
            {
                UpdateProperties();
                return _make;
            }
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty("model")]
    public string Model
    {
        get
        {
            if (_model != null)
            {
                return _model;
            }
            else
            {
                UpdateProperties();
                return _model;
            }
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty("self")]
    public Uri Self { get; set; }

    public void UpdateProperties()
    {
    }
}

In the UpdateProperties() method above, I can make it use the Self property to get and deserialize a new instance of a Car class, but I want it to refresh the properties of the current Car class instance instead. I can do this manually by setting each property individually again, but since I need to do this for many classes, I would appreciate a better way. Is this possible?

Or am I going about this all wrong?

EDIT:

Here is an example of the JSON the API would return. Lets say I make a call to get information about the vehicle fleet. It would return:

{
    "details" : "something"
    "car": {
        "make": "Ford",
        "self": "https://..."
         }
    "truck": {
         "age": 30,
         "self": "https://..."
         }
}

where when you access the url provided by car.self, it would return the following JSON:

{
    "make" : "Toyota",
    "model" : "Camry",
    "self" : "https://..."
}
0

The only way with your current setup to reset all of the properties manually.

You're right to want to have this be automatic, since that's a lot of boilerplate code. This is a common problem and the most common solution to it is to use the DTO or Data Transfer Object pattern.

You would introduce a new class called a CarDto and instead of Car exposing private fields, it would expose the properties on the CarDto.

See Below:

public class Car {

    private CarDto _dto = null;
    public Car(CarDto dto = null) {
        //If we pass in a dto, use it, otherwise create a new one
        _dto = dto ?? new CarDto();
    }

    [JsonProperty("make")]
    public string Make {
        get {
            if (_dto.Make == null) {
                UpdateProperties();
            }
            return _dto.Make;
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty("model")]
    public string Model {
        get {
            if (_dto.Model == null) {
                UpdateProperties();
            }
            return _dto.Model;
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty("self")]
    public Uri Self { get; set; }

    public void UpdateProperties() { 
        //The API would return a CarDto.
        CarDto newDto = APICall(); //Mock code
        _dto = newDto;
    }
}

public class CarDto {
    public string Make { get;set; }
    public string Model { get;set; }
}

So now, if you ever have a null property, you will make a call to UpdateProperties. This will then return a new CarDto that you use as your private _dto field.

This is a SUPER useful and common pattern, and one that makes things a lot easier so it's great to implement and get practice using! Let me know if anything is unclear.

0

So, let me offer a different perspective. The problem description seems straightforward enough- I have two API calls, one which returns a partial object, and one which returns a complete object. I don't want to make two calls if I don't have to. So, I'll just make the second call and "fill in the details" if I need to, right?

Wrong.

The proposed approach is not a good idea.

This goes off the rails from the beginning with the design of the API. The objects returned by the API should not be so complicated so as to require multiple calls to return the "full" object as described in the code. But, let's assume I have no control over the design of the API - what should I do?

Programmers are frequently faced with the task of confronting a badly-designed API. These create leaky abstractions like the one described in this problem, where there is a strong desire to "paper over" the bad API design. The problem is that not all bad designs can be papered over. This is one.

What is proposed here is to introduce a painful side-effect of a get accessor. This is arguably the worst way to solve the problem of a bad API design. A typical get method returns with a negligible amount of time - it's a simple memory access. This proposed get accessor could potentially take seconds to return, it could fail, it could throw an exception. Worse yet, there is no indication to the caller that this is, in fact, access to an external interface. At the end of the day, the state of your object is not deterministic, which is the arguably the worst thing you can have in a program.

If that wasn't bad enough, get accessors have no provision for asynchronous operations, which are common when dealing with remote APIs. User experience will suffer. By taking this approach, I will have actually taken one problem and made a new problem everywhere this class is used.

A better approach:

The API has two separate functions, so really, this implies two separate result types. I would create one type for the partial class and a second type for the full class. After all, I'm writing code - and unless the code is in the habit of re-writing itself, I should know at the time of writing whether I need the full or the partial representation of the object.

To get the full representation, I'll provide a separate access to the API, with appropriate methods to allow for asynchronous execution (e.g. observables). This will have the added benefit of allowing me to examine (via the "where used" function) where in the program these different API calls are used. This might build a case for me to return to the API designer and suggest a change to the design, based on how I'm using it.

  • Thanks for the thorough response! I wanted to clarify - so looking at the json response in the question (edited in), would you recommend having a partial car object to store the car object I get when I make the call to vehicle_fleet, and then a separate full car object to store the item returned at vehicle_fleet.car.self? – ajaff Jan 14 at 16:36
  • Yes. You can have the full inherit from the partial, but the key is that you cannot use a partial car where you need a full car. – theMayer Jan 14 at 17:13

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.