4

The following code starts a server that does not respond when hit (snippet#1). Nodejs does not execute the callback function nor does it throw any error

const http = require('http');
var port=3000;
var http_server = http.createServer(server_callback);
http_server.listen(port, ()=>{
    console.log("HTTP server is listening on port", port);
});

var server_callback = (req,res)=>{
    res.end("hello\n");
}

However this works (snippet#2)

const http = require('http');
var port=3000;
var server_callback = (req,res)=>{
    res.end("hello\n");
}
var http_server = http.createServer(server_callback);
http_server.listen(port, ()=>{
    console.log("HTTP server is listening on port", port);
});

and this too (snippet#3)

const http = require('http');
var port=3000;
var http_server = http.createServer(function(req,res){
    server_callback(req,res)
});
http_server.listen(port, ()=>{
    console.log("HTTP server is listening on port", port);
});

var server_callback = (req,res)=>{
    res.end("hello\n");
}

So one explanation I could come up with why snippet#2 worked and snippet#1 didn't is that server_callback was not defined in snippet#1 when the server was created. But that doesn't explain why it works in snippet#3.

What is going on here? And why does node not throw any error when server from snippet#1 is hit

4

The argument passed to .createServer is stored internally, immediately when .createServer is called. Then, when the server is pinged, that argument (hopefully function) is called. In snippet 1, your

var http_server = http.createServer(server_callback);

resolves to

var http_server = http.createServer(undefined);

so createServer's internals don't have a stored function to call later.

In snippet 2, the passed value is the real function: server_callback has been assigned to, so it resolves to

var http_server = http.createServer((req,res)=>{
  res.end("hello\n");
});

so .createServer does have a function to store internally that can be called later. Similarly, in snippet 3, you're passing a function that can be invoked:

var http_server = http.createServer(function(req,res){
  server_callback(req,res)
});

Here, server_callback doesn't have to be defined when you pass the callback, but by the time the script has finished and the server is waiting for connections, the last line of the script will have run, which assigns to server_callback, so it'll run successfully.

This doesn't actually have anything to do with Node, really - you'll see the same sort of behavior with any callback-based function. Equivalent snippet 1:

// similar to createServer:
const createSomething = callback => {
  setTimeout(callback, 500);
};

createSomething(server_callback);
var server_callback = () => console.log('callback running');

Equivalent snippet 2:

// similar to createServer:
const createSomething = callback => {
  setTimeout(callback, 500);
};

var server_callback = () => console.log('callback running');
createSomething(server_callback);

Equivalent snippet 3:

// similar to createServer:
const createSomething = callback => {
  setTimeout(callback, 500);
};

createSomething(() => server_callback());
var server_callback = () => console.log('callback running');

2

This phenomenon is due to something called function hoisting in javascript. When a function is declared using the function keyword, the function is parsed as if it were at the very top of the file or outer function. BUT, and it is a big but, when a function is declared as a function expression, the hoisting does not work.

So like this:

function name(){}

get's hoisted and is in memory ready to go before anything else, while this:

var name = function(){}

does not.

EDIT: As CertainPerformance pointed out in comments, every one of your functions is declared as an expression. The first example will work fine if you use the function key word to declare your callback:

function server_callback(req,res){
    res.end("hello\n");
}
  • There aren't any function declarations in the question, though. They're all function expressions. – CertainPerformance Jan 13 at 0:47
  • @CertainPerformance - exactly. they are all expressions that the OP uses without regard to scope/hoisting. If the OP changes example one to use the function keyword rather than an expression, it will work fine. – Randy Casburn Jan 13 at 0:49

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