2

I'm wondering what the advantages of storing data as JSON are compared to just storing it as JavaScript objects. For example, if I have a file with the following JSON:

{
    "pizza": [
        {
            "name": "Margherita",
            "price": 65,
            "ingredients": [
                "tomatsås",
                "mozzarella",
                "basilika"
            ]
        },
        {
            "name": "Pizza ai quattro formaggi",
            "price": 70,
            "ingredients": [
                "tomatsås",
                "mozzarella",
                "gorgonzola",
                "parmesan",
                "fontina"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

why can't I just write it as a JavaScript object like this:

menu = {
    pizza: [
        {
            name: "Margherita",
            price: 65,
            ingredients: [
                "tomatsås",
                "mozzarella",
                "basilika"
            ]
        },
        {
            name: "Pizza ai quattro formaggi",
            price: 70,
            ingredients: [
                "tomatsås",
                "mozzarella",
                "gorgonzola",
                "parmesan",
                "fontina"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

that way I don't have to parse it, it's easier to access if the file is stored locally, and it's even slightly shorter since the keys don't need to be in quotes.

However, since this is my first time using JSON I'm probably missing something, so what are the benefits of using JSON over a JavaScript object?

  • Check this article please. medium.com/techtrument/javascript-object-vs-json-117965ea3dea – westdabestdb Jan 13 at 1:26
  • Because menu = { would have to be evaled, whereas JSON can be JSON.parsed (safer, more elegant) – CertainPerformance Jan 13 at 1:30
  • The quotes/lack of quotes is irrelevant to the "actual" question, excepting as one is valid JSON and one is not. The "actual" question is about including the data in the JavaScript or as an external resource. With that re-statement it should be more clear when one might be 'more appropriate' - is it external data (config, web request response, dynamic data, etc.) or not? – user2864740 Jan 13 at 3:50
1

They're tools for different jobs. JSON is a data serialization format. JavaScript (which is what your standard inline objects must be in) is for writing your scripts.

This has implications in how you can use them. For example, you can't (easily) have a script that creates JavaScript with an inline object. Suppose you wanted to write out this data as JSON with your script. It's as simple as writeFile('file', JSON.stringify(data)). There is no built-in library for creating JavaScript with JavaScript, so you couldn't write a JavaScript script with an object directly. At best, you could concatenate a static script (const menu = in your case) to the JSON-encoded data.

There are potential security implications as well. Nothing stored in your JSON blob will be executed, ever. However if you make a mistake when building this script with arbitrary data, there is a potential to execute something since the script has to be executed to be evaluated.

Without using a loader, your script can only work in a specific context. That is, if it has const menu = at the top, menu is declared and cannot be renamed/reused without some workarounds. With loading the JSON, you can parse it and use it however you want, in whatever context you want, without worrying about side effects.

that way I don't have to parse it

The JavaScript compiler does.

it's easier to access if the file is stored locally

I assume you're referring to loading files directly on disk. It's recommended that you run a small basic web server.

and it's even slightly shorter since the keys don't need to be in quotes

This isn't really a winning argument either way. The difference is marginal.

I suspect that the JSON parser will be marginally faster as well, since it has less to deal with.

  • When I said that JavaScript is easier than JSON to access when stored locally, I meant that I can access the JS file using script src in my HTML document but to access a JSON I need to send an HTTP request, but it doesn't seem to be as complicated as I thought. Also, I don't really understand why JSON would be faster. – user204677 Jan 13 at 2:28
  • Nit: JavaScript object literals can be written verbatim as JSON (the opposite is not true) with one teeny little exception nobody knows about.. it's perfectly fine to quote keys in JavaScript object literals. – user2864740 Jan 13 at 3:45
  • @user204677 It is incorrect that JSON 'needs an HTTP request'. JSON is normally used with requests - sure, but it would be just as "valid" to have JSON (as a string, as opposed to a JavaScript object literal) included directly in a script or via another resource. – user2864740 Jan 13 at 3:47
  • @Brad Me too :} – user2864740 Jan 13 at 3:55
  • 1
    @user2864740 I know, I could have phrased that better, what I meant was that HTTP requests are needed to access external JSON files AFAIK. – user204677 Jan 13 at 4:36

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