142

I have a few different interfaces and objects that each have a type property. Let's say these are objects stored in a NoSQL db. How can I create a generic getItem function with a deterministic return type based on its input parameter type?

interface Circle {
    type: "circle";
    radius: number;
}

interface Square {
    type: "square";
    length: number;
}

const shapes: (Circle | Square)[] = [
    { type: "circle", radius: 1 },
    { type: "circle", radius: 2 },
    { type: "square", length: 10 }];

function getItems(type: "circle" | "square") {
    return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type);
    // Think of this as items coming from a database
    // I'd like the return type of this function to be
    // deterministic based on the `type` value provided as a parameter. 
}

const circles = getItems("circle");
for (const circle of circles) {
    console.log(circle.radius);
                       ^^^^^^
}

Property 'radius' does not exist on type 'Circle | Square'.

6 Answers 6

234

Conditional Types to the rescue:

interface Circle {
    type: "circle";
    radius: number;
}

interface Square {
    type: "square";
    length: number;
}

type TypeName = "circle" | "square"; 

type ObjectType<T> = 
    T extends "circle" ? Circle :
    T extends "square" ? Square :
    never;

const shapes: (Circle | Square)[] = [
    { type: "circle", radius: 1 },
    { type: "circle", radius: 2 },
    { type: "square", length: 10 }];

function getItems<T extends TypeName>(type: T) : ObjectType<T>[]  {
    return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type) as ObjectType<T>[];
}

const circles = getItems("circle");
for (const circle of circles) {
    console.log(circle.radius);
}

Thanks Silvio for pointing me in the right direction.

3
  • 18
    Oh, that's much simpler than the hackery I suggested. I blame it on it being midnight where I am right now, but yeah this is a better solution. Well done, and I'm glad I could be of assistance! Jan 13, 2019 at 4:09
  • @ArashMotamedi Could be an extension to this question, How can I modify this func so that I were to access s.radius or s.length instead of s.type depending on the type passed in function ` ``` getItems<T extends TypeName>(type: T) : ObjectType<T>[] { return shapes.filter(s => s.length == 1) as ObjectType<T>[]; } OR ` ``` getItems<T extends TypeName>(type: T) : ObjectType<T>[] { return shapes.filter(s => s.radius == 1) as ObjectType<T>[]; }Typescript is throwing an error saying that length does not exist on type Circle. I want to use the same func but access diff vars.
    – Veryon890
    Feb 19, 2021 at 5:24
  • Can you modify this so that the type parameter is optional? Neither type?: T nor type: T = "circle" currently work with this.
    – DaDo
    Sep 30, 2021 at 14:46
75

You're looking for overload signatures

function getItems(type: "circle"): Circle[]
function getItems(type: "square"): Square[]
function getItems(type: "circle" | "square") {
    return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type);
}

Putting multiple type signatures before the actual definition allows you to list different "cases" into which your function's signature can fall.

Edit after your comment

So it turns out, what you're wanting is possible, but we may have to jump through a few hoops to get there.

First, we're going to need a way to translate each name. We want "circle" to map to Circle, "square" to Square, etc. To this end, we can use a conditional type.

type ObjectType<T> =
  T extends "circle" ? Circle :
  T extends "square" ? Square :
  never;

(I use never as the fallback in the hopes that it very quickly creates a type error if you somehow end up with an invalid type)

Now, I don't know of a way to parameterize over the type of a function call like you're asking for, but Typescript does support parameterizing over the keys of an object by means of mapped typed. So if you're willing to trade in the getItems("circle") syntax for getItems["circle"], we can at least describe the type.

interface Keys {
  circle: "circle";
  square: "square";
}

type GetItemsType = {
  [K in keyof Keys]: ObjectType<K>[];
}

Problem is, we have to actually construct an object of this type now. Provided you're targeting ES2015 (--target es2015 or newer when compiling), you can use the Javascript Proxy type. Now, unfortunately, I don't know of a good way to convince Typescript that what we're doing is okay, so a quick cast through any will quell its concerns.

let getItems: GetItemsType = <any>new Proxy({}, {
  get: function(target, type) {
    return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type);
  }
});

So you lose type checking on the actual getItems "function", but you gain stronger type checking at the call site. Then, to make the call,

const circles = getItems["circle"];
for (const circle of circles) {
    console.log(circle.radius);
}

Is this worth it? That's up to you. It's a lot of extra syntax, and your users have to use the [] notation, but it gets the result you want.

5
  • Right, that's how I started but then the number of types grew, and then the number of functions grew (get, put, update, upsert, delete, query, etc.) and so the overload signatures got enormous. Is there another TypeScript feature available that can do this? For example I could define interface ObjectTypes { circle: Circle, square: Square }... would there be any clever way of doing function get(type: "square" | "circle"): ObjectTypes[type] basically? Jan 13, 2019 at 2:38
  • Thanks Silvio. I got inspired by your ideas and used the Conditional Type idea. Posted my final solution below. What do you think? Jan 13, 2019 at 4:07
  • 1
    For other simpler cases the function overload method from this answer is probably the easier to read solution. Apr 8, 2020 at 5:33
  • Is there a simpler approach when using "T | Array<T>" for any type? For functions that can process either a single value or an array of values
    – Eric Burel
    Mar 1, 2022 at 8:26
  • @ArashMotamedi bit late to the party, but what you are looking for is achiavable: typescriptlang.org/… Jun 30, 2022 at 13:36
27

I ran into a similar issue. If you don't want to have both TypeName and ObjectType types, this can also be done using a single interface:

interface TypeMap {
  "circle": Circle;
  "square": Square;
}

function getItems<T extends keyof TypeMap>(type: T) : TypeMap[T][]  {
  return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type) as TypeMap[T][];
}
0
2

I would suggest using a helper type to convert from the string to the object

type AtoB<A, B> = B extends { type: infer V } ? V extends A ? B : never : never;

It can then be used like in Arash Motamedi's answer to convert the type at the end

return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type) as AtoB<T, Circle | Square>[];

You can also use it as a Type Guard inside the filter like so:

function getItems<T extends TypeName, U extends AtoB<T, Circle | Square>>(type: T) {
    return shapes.filter((s): s is U => s.type == type);
}

which might be a bit safer

-7

@ArashMotamedi, i see that you were trying to save some code by making a generic function, but now the code is less readable, and got more complex. If we know that "getItems" should return a circle, just create a "getCircles" function, which returns the corresponding type.

1
  • 1
    You should try to actually answer the question instead of making a judgment call and deciding that the question is not worth answering. It's up to the person themselves whether they want to make unreadable generic and more complex code. This is not up to you to decide.
    – Marnix
    Mar 18, 2023 at 8:30
-8
As you have mentioned that data is comming from No-Sql database with a type property. you can create type property as string value and change your interfaces as a class to check instanceOf in your function.

class Circle {
    type: string;
    radius: number;
}

class Square {
    type: string;
    length: number;
}

const shapes: (Circle | Square)[] = [
    { type: "circle", radius: 1 },
    { type: "circle", radius: 2 },
    { type: "square", length: 10 }];

function getItems(type: string) {
    return shapes.filter(s => s.type == type);
    // Think of this as items coming from a database
    // I'd like the return type of this function to be
    // deterministic based on the `type` value provided as a parameter. 
}

const circles = getItems("circle");
for (const circle of circles) {
    if (circle instanceof Circle) {
        console.log(circle.radius);
    } else if (circle instanceof Square) {
        console.log(circle.length);
    }
} 
1

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