1

x=[0.3, 0.3, 0.3, ..., 0.3] (number of 0.3: 10)

y=x

What is the linear correlation coefficiency between x and y?

For this x and y, all pairs points to the same point (0.3, 0.3). Can we say x and y are linear correlated?

scipy.stats.pearsonr(x, y) will give you Yes (1.0, 0.0). But does it make sense?

However, if we change all 0.3 to 3, scipy will give you No (NaN, 1.0). Why is it different from previous (0.3) one? Related to the deviation of the floating numbers? But if we use 3.0 instead of 3, we still get No (NaN, 1.0). Does any one know why different inputs generates different outputs?

# When using 0.3:
# result: (1.0, 0.0)
import scipy.stats
a=[]
for i in range(10):
    a.append(0.3)
b=a
scipy.stats.pearsonr(a,b)



# When using int 3:
# result: (nan, 1.0)
import scipy.stats
a=[]
for i in range(10):
    a.append(3)
b=a
scipy.stats.pearsonr(a,b)



# When using 3.0:
# result: (nan, 1.0)
import scipy.stats
a=[]
for i in range(10):
    a.append(3.0)
b=a
scipy.stats.pearsonr(a,b)

See the in-line comments above.

0

Using the Pearson R coefficient, which assumes a normal distribution of the data, on a bunch of constants is a mathematically undefined operation.

xm = x - x.mean()
ym = y - y.mean()
r = sum(xm * ym) / np.sqrt( sum(xm**2) * sum(ym**2) )

In other words, if there is no variation in your data, you are dividing by zero.

Now the reason why it works for a repetition of the float 0.3:

a = [0.3 for _ in range(10)] #note that single-decimal only 0.3 and 0.6 fail
b = [3.0 for _ in range(10)]
print(np.asarray(a).mean(), np.asarray(b).mean())
#0.29999999999999993 3.0
print(0.3 - 0.29999999999999993)
#5.551115123125783e-17

So, by merit of this tiny, tiny floating point deviation stemming from the averaging operation, there is something to calculate and the correlation can be pegged at 1.0; although the application of the method is still invalid.

  • Many thanks - so it does related to the deviation of float. There must be some optimization so sometimes the deviation is shown and sometimes not. – Steven Ding Jan 14 at 14:53
  • It is just the floating point limitation. Try playing around with as_integer_ratio() (e.g. 0.1.as_integer_ratio() ) to see what is happening with the exact representation. – Uvar Jan 14 at 15:46
  • Many thanks! You answered my question! However, I have too few points and I can't thumb your answer. :S – Steven Ding Jan 23 at 8:53
  • @StevenDing: True; can still accept the answer though. ;) – Uvar Jan 23 at 13:03

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