3

Consider I have an array of integer elements. In which I am trying to find the index where a long sequence of repetitive numbers begins.

my_array = [100, 101, 100, 102, 100, 100, 101, 100, 250, 251, 253, 260, 250, 200, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 120]

Bellow is the way I am trying to find the index. Can anyone suggest me more optimised and correct way of doing it?

my_array.each with_index do |e, x|
  match = e.to_s * 5
  next_10 = my_array[x + 1, 5].join()

  if match == next_10
    puts "index #{x}"
    break
  end
end

#index 14
  • 1
    What is your definition of array getting normalised? – ray Jan 14 at 11:07
  • @ray same elements starts appearing. – Aparichith Jan 14 at 11:11
  • 1
    @Aparichith "same elements starts appearing" is a bit vague. That almost sounds like "you'll know it when you see it". Be more specific, please. – Stefan Jan 14 at 11:23
  • @Stefan We can define function for finding starting index of longest repeating number sequence but it does not define it normalised. – ray Jan 14 at 11:25
  • "Can anyone suggest me [a] more [...] correct way" – what's wrong with your approach? – Stefan Jan 14 at 11:28
2
my_array.index.with_index{|value,index| my_array[index,6].uniq.size==1}

This is a kind of tweak, if you mean "optimised" just in the way code looks like.If you mean optimised performance. it does not fit.

  • can you elaborate how number 6 works here? seems it will not work for other combinations of integers. – Oshan Wisumperuma Jan 15 at 5:53
  • The question has been changed. This answer is based on the demonstration code. – Pengcheng Zhou Jan 15 at 9:06
1

In first iteration, I am getting array of repeating elements sequence and then I proceed further with logic,

groups = my_array[1..-1].inject([[my_array[0]]]) { |m, n| m.last[0] == n ? m.last << n : m << [n]; m }
# => [[100], [101], [100], [102], [100, 100], [101], [100], [250], [251], [253], [260], [250], [200], [100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100], [120]]

groups[0,groups.index(groups.sort { |a,b| a.count <=> b.count }.last)].flatten.count
# => 14

Using regex, it can be precise and simple.

1

I assume the objective is to find the index of the first element of the longest sequence of equal elements in the given array.

my_array = [100, 101, 100, 102, 100, 100, 101, 100, 250, 251, 253, 260, 250, 200,
            100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
            120]

Here that would be 14, the index of 100 that is followed by 8 more 100's.

We can do that as follows.

my_array.each_index.chunk { |i| my_array[i] }.
         max_by { |_,a| a.size }.
         last.
         first
           #=> 14

The steps are as follows.

enum0 = my_array.each_index
  #=> #<Enumerator: [100, 101, 100,..., 100, 120]:each_index> 

We can see the elements that will be generated by this enumerator by converting it to an array.

enum0.to_a
  #=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,
  #    17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23]

Continuing,

enum1 = enum0.chunk { |i| my_array[i] }
  #=> #<Enumerator: #<Enumerator::Generator:0x000058d8d09ec8a0>:each> 

In view of the above expression's return value, enum1 could be thought of as a compound enumerator, though Ruby has no such concept. Let's see the values enum1 will generate.

enum1.to_a
  #=> [[100, [0]], [101, [1]], [100, [2]], [102, [3]], [100, [4, 5]],
  #    [101, [6]], [100, [7]], [250, [8]], [251, [9]], [253, [10]],
  #    [260, [11]], [250, [12]], [200, [13]],
  #    [100, [14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22]],
  #    [120, [23]]]

Continuing,

a = enum1.max_by { |v,a| a.size }
  #=> [100, [14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22]]

As v is not used in the block, this expression would customarily be written:

a = enum1.max_by { |_,a| a.size }

The presence of the underscore (a valid local variable) signals to the reader that that block variable is not used in the block calculation. The last two steps are as follows.

b = a.last
  #=> [14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22] 
b.first
  #=> 14 

See Enumerable#chunk and Enumerable#max_by.

1
my_array = [100, 101, 100, 102, 100, 100, 101, 100, 250, 251, 253, 260, 250, 200, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 120]


index_and_repetitions = lambda { |my_array|
  stk = {}
  previous = my_array[0]
  last_index = 0
  stk[last_index] = 1
  my_array.drop(0).each_with_index{|item, index|
    if item == previous
      stk[last_index] += 1
    else
      last_index = index
      stk[last_index] = 1
      previous = item
    end
  }
  stk
}

stk = index_and_repetitions.call(my_array)
puts stk.key(stk.values.max)

you can find benchmark results(compared to others answers) from here.

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