10

I don't really understand how @required works. For example I've seen this code:

class Test{
  final String x;
  Test({
    @required this.x
  });

  factory Test.initial(){
    return Test(x: "");
  }

}

But what should @required do here? Seems like it makes an optional parameter a non optional parameter.

9

After null safety:

With Dart 2.12 (null safety), the @required keyword is now replaced by required. You should mark your field required if it is mandatory for others to pass some value to it.

Example:

class Foo {
  final int a; // If mandatory, needs 'required'
  final int b; // If not mandatory, doesn't need 'required'

  Foo({
    required this.a, // Marked 'required'
    this.b = 1, 
  });
}

Before null safety:

@required is needed when you have more than 1 named parameters and you want some of the parameters to be mandatory, you annotate it using @required.

Example

class Foo {
  final int a; // Say 'a' is mandatory
  final int b;

  Foo({
    @required this.a, // Annotate it with '@required'
    this.b,
  });
}
9
  • 1
    even if I dont mention the annotation then also it is mandatory to pass the parameter since default constructor is overloaded by this constructor. What is the use of it then? – NullByte08 May 31 '20 at 1:48
  • 1
    @NullByte08 I didn't get you clearly, you don't need to pass any value to a if you don't annotate it with @required. – CopsOnRoad May 31 '20 at 1:50
  • 1
    no, it is required to pass the value to a even if it is not annotated with @required – NullByte08 May 31 '20 at 1:56
  • @NullByte08 I'd love if you can post a question with this detail, I can assist you better. – CopsOnRoad May 31 '20 at 1:57
  • @NullByte08 Is there any problem in creating a new question? – CopsOnRoad May 31 '20 at 2:00
28

Update

As of Dart 2.12, the required keyword replaces the @required meta annotation. For detailed info look into the official FAQ. The following answer has been updated to reflect both this and null safety.

Parameters required by default

The parameters of a class constructor or function are required by default.

class Test {
  final String x;
  Test(this.x);
}

You're not allowed to do this:

final value = Test(); 
// 1 positional argument(s) expected, but 0 found.

You must do this:

final value = Test('hello');

Optional named parameters

If you surround a parameter with curly braces, though, in addition to becoming a named parameter, it also becomes optional.

Since it's optional, the property must either be nullable like this:

class Test {
  final String? x;
  Test({this.x});
}

Or it has to have a default value like this:

class Test {
  final String? x;
  Test({this.x = ''});
}

So now this is ok:

final value = Test(); 

And so is this:

final value = Test(x: 'hello'); 

Required named parameters

Sometimes you don't want to allow a parameter to be null and there is no natural default variable. In that case you can add the required keyword in front of the parameter name:

class Test {
  final String x;
  Test({required this.x});
}

This is not ok anymore:

final value = Test(); 
// The named parameter 'x' is required, but there's no corresponding argument.

But this is still fine:

final value = Test(x: 'hello');
0
3

@required is an annotation that will create a warning for you to remember that the named parameter is necessary for the class to work as expected. It will not create compile errors, at least for what I know.

2
  • 1
    But if that parameter is necessary, why is it set as an optional? – Little Monkey Jan 14 '19 at 13:01
  • 1
    Mostly for code readability. Non-named parameters cannot be quickly understood by someone who is reading an object instantiation. – Martyns Jan 14 '19 at 13:12
1

@required bounds you to pass @required marked arguments while creating object of Class. For example, while showing a dialog, you'd mark context as required since, you cannot show dialog without having a valid context. But, you should not overuse it.

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