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In an effort to do some basic housekeeping on our Amazon RDS (Postgresql) instance, my team hopes to drop unused or rarely used tables from our database. In Redshift, I used the stl_query table to determine which tables were accessed frequently enough to remain.

The problem is, I can't seem to figure out an equivalent strategy for Postgres. I tried checking the log files in the console, but these don't appear to have the correct info.

Aside from searching our code base for references to used tables, is there a good strategy to find unused / infrequently used tables in Postgres? If sufficient logs exist, I am willing to write some sort of parsing script to get the necessary data - I just need to find a good source.

  • You keep saying you are looking for a solution for "RDS". RDS manages the servers for you, not the individual database tables. Your question is about things happening inside the RDBMS engine. You need to be looking for "Postgres" solutions to this, not "RDS". – Mark B Jan 14 at 16:07
  • That makes complete sense. I included RDS simply because I thought there might be some functionality built into the console or CLI that I was not aware of, which is often the case with AWS. – cdc200 Jan 14 at 16:23
  • I think this Postgresql answer can help you: stackoverflow.com/a/3869606/2831645 – thibpat Jan 14 at 16:28
  • The statistics collector views are exactly what I needed, thanks! – cdc200 Jan 14 at 16:37
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It turns out the statistics I need live in the statistics collector views, specifically pg_stat_user_tables.

This is the query I was able to find infrequently accessed tables:

SELECT 
    relname, 
    schemaname 
FROM    
    pg_stat_user_tables
WHERE 
    (idx_tup_fetch + seq_tup_read) < 5; --access threshold

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