2

I wrote two benchmarks to demonstrate that JIT can be a problem with writing fine benchmark (Please skip that I doesnt use @State here):

@Fork(value = 1)
@Warmup(iterations = 2, time = 10)
@Measurement(iterations = 3, time = 2)
@BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
public class DeadCodeTraps {

    @Benchmark
    @OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS)
    public static void summaryStatistics_standardDeviationForFourNumbers() {
        final SummaryStatistics summaryStatistics = new SummaryStatistics();
        summaryStatistics.addValue(10.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(20.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(30.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(40.0);
        summaryStatistics.getStandardDeviation();
    }

    @Benchmark
    @OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS)
    public static void summaryStatistics_standardDeviationForTenNumbers() {
        final SummaryStatistics summaryStatistics = new SummaryStatistics();
        summaryStatistics.addValue(10.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(20.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(30.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(40.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(50.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(60.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(70.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(80.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(90.0);
        summaryStatistics.addValue(100.0);
        summaryStatistics.getStandardDeviation();
    }

}

I thought that JIT will eliminate dead code, so two methods will be executed at the same time. But in the end, I have:

summaryStatistics_standardDeviationForFourNumbers 0.158 ± 0.046 DeadCodeTraps.summaryStatistics_standardDeviationForTenNumbers 0.359 ± 0.294

Why JIT does not optimize it? The result of summaryStatistics.getStandardDeviation(); is not used anywhere outside the method and it is not returned by it.

(I am using OpenJDK build 10.0.2+13-Ubuntu-1ubuntu0.18.04.4)

  • 1
    What code is dead here? Are you expecting both codes to take the same time? – kutschkem Jan 14 at 16:03
  • What specifically do you expect? I am not at all surprised by that result – luk2302 Jan 14 at 16:04
  • summaryStatistics.getStandardDeviation(); is not used anywhere outside the scope of the method or returned so it doesn't make sense to keep that code after JIT optimization? Or maybe it keeps it as it cannot decide if this code has any side effects? – ByeBye Jan 14 at 16:08
5

If you're talking about the Apache Commons Math SummaryStatistics class, then it's a massive class. Its construction will most certainly not be inlined. To see why, run with -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+PrintInlining -XX:-BackgroundCompilation

Dead code elimination happens after inlining. Unused objects will back-propagate, but the non-inlined constructor will break the chain because the JIT optimizer can no longer be sure there are no side effects.

In other words, the code you expect to be eliminated is too big.

  • Yeah, you are right. In the first place, I wanted to use DoubleSummaryStatistics from java.util but I messed up with imports. In DoubleSummaryStatistics case IT IS inlined and has the almost same result as an empty method. Thanks! – ByeBye Jan 14 at 16:44

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