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I am trying to access an AWS service directly from the browser- specifically the SNS service. I want to be able to post a message directly to an sns topic, but using a CNAME record so I can control which region the browser ultimately goes to (sns.mydomain.com -> sns.us-east-1.amazonaws.com | sns.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com depending on requesters region).

My issue is that if I make an HTTPS request to my aliased endpoint, the returned certificate will not be signed to my endpoint and the browser will refuse to work with it. And while I can get around this by making only HTTP requests, the browser will refuse to make an HTTP request from a secure origin (a site served on HTTPS).

Is it possible to have a CNAME point to an AWS service in the way that I'm trying to do it?

Ultimately, i'm trying to avoid locking the client application in the browser into an aws region.

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Is it possible to have a CNAME point to an AWS service in the way that I'm trying to do it?

No. You're hitting up against a central feature of https verification, namely the Common Name of the cert or a SAN ( Subject Alternative Name) must match the certificate. If it weren't so, HTTPS would not be validating that the server is who they claim to be.

Ultimately, i'm trying to avoid locking the client application in the browser into an aws region.

That's a fine goal. Instead of doing so at the DNS layer, why not create an endpoint or configuration setting that supplies region or regions to use? A smart client could even iterate through regions in the case of some failures that appeared to be regional outages, which is somewhat better than a CNAME that you still have to fix when a region goes down.

  • Makes sense. I was hoping aws provided some other solution here or a regionless endpoint that could autoroute possibly. Your configuration endpoint would work but with the volume of requests coming in that may negate all of the cost savings of avoiding api gateway. I'm considering keeping a timezone to region lookup client side and resolving the region before each request. It won't be 100% but i imagine it will be close – micah Jan 14 at 17:01
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    @micah I'm not sure how far into this you are, but these service endpoints are not designed to be either customizable or interchangeable. Additionally, the signature and other attributes for otherwise identical, simultaneous-in-time requests will be different for different regions; you cannot sign a request without knowing in advance which region it is going to be sent to. – Michael - sqlbot Jan 14 at 17:53
  • @Michael-sqlbot Ah that's good to know. I haven't tried signing a request for one region and sending to another but I guess I would have discovered it eventually. It's looking like the only way to do this is to have the client know which region it wants to go to. Anything else and you should just continue to use api gateway – micah Jan 14 at 18:24
  • Lambda@Edge is quite a bit cheaper than API Gateway and has quite a bit of feature overlap... it all depends on your needs, but Lambda@Edge functions execute in the region closest to the viewer, and it exposes the region that is processing the current request via process.env.AWS_REGION. You can make your routing decision from there and send a request to SNS from inside the Lambda function. – Michael - sqlbot Jan 14 at 19:34

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