8

I have a timeseries dataset and I am trying to train a network so that it overfits (obviously, that's just the first step, I will then battle the overfitting).

The network has two layers: LSTM (32 neurons) and Dense (1 neuron, no activation)

Training/model has these parameters: epochs: 20, steps_per_epoch: 100, loss: "mse", optimizer: "rmsprop".

TimeseriesGenerator produces the input series with: length: 1, sampling_rate: 1, batch_size: 1.

I would expect the network would just memorize such a small dataset (I have tried even much more complicated network to no avail) and the loss on training dataset would be pretty much zero. It is not and when I visualize the results on the training set like this:

y_pred = model.predict_generator(gen)
plot_points = 40
epochs = range(1, plot_points + 1)
pred_points = numpy.resize(y_pred[:plot_points], (plot_points,))
target_points = gen.targets[:plot_points]
plt.plot(epochs, pred_points, 'b', label='Predictions')
plt.plot(epochs, target_points, 'r', label='Targets')
plt.legend()
plt.show()

I get:

predictions and targets chart

The predictions have somewhat smaller amplitude but are precisely inverse to the targets. Btw. this is not memorized, they are inversed even for the test dataset which the algorithm hasn't trained on at all.It appears that instead of memorizing the dataset, my network just learned to negate the input value and slightly scale it down. Any idea why this is happening? It doesn't seem like the solution the optimizer should have converged to (loss is pretty big).

EDIT (some relevant parts of my code):

train_gen = keras.preprocessing.sequence.TimeseriesGenerator(
        x,
        y,
        length=1,
        sampling_rate=1,
        batch_size=1,
        shuffle=False
    )

model = Sequential()
model.add(LSTM(32, input_shape=(1, 1), return_sequences=False))
model.add(Dense(1, input_shape=(1, 1)))

model.compile(
    loss="mse",
    optimizer="rmsprop",
    metrics=[keras.metrics.mean_squared_error]
)

history = model.fit_generator(
    train_gen,
    epochs=20,
    steps_per_epoch=100
)

EDIT (different, randomly generated dataset):

enter image description here

I had to increase number of LSTM neurons to 256, with the previous setting (32 neurons), the blue line was pretty much flat. However, with the increase the same pattern arises - inverse predictions with somewhat smaller amplitude.

EDIT (targets shifted by +1):

enter image description here

Shifting the targets by one compared to predictions doesn't produce much better fit. Notice the highlighted parts where the graph isn't just alternating, it's more apparent there.

EDIT (increased length to 2 ... TimeseriesGenerator(length=2, ...)):

enter image description here

With length=2 the predictions stop tracking the targets so closely but the overall pattern of inversion still stands.

  • 4
    It seems that showing us the code you used to train the model instead would be more relevant – Reti43 Jan 14 at 22:32
  • have you tried with a different dataset? if so, did you get the same pattern? – Alex Jan 17 at 15:19
  • I noticed input_shape=(1, 1) for the second layer. Why is that? – prosti Jan 17 at 19:46
  • 1
    You are right, input_shape=(1, 1) on the second layer isn't necessary. I have tried removing it and nothing changes. – asdf Jan 17 at 20:05
  • 2
    Can you share how you generate the data? – sdcbr Jan 17 at 20:09
4
+50

You say that your network "just learned to negate the input value and slightly scale it down". I don't think so. It is very likely that all you are seeing is the network performing poorly, and just predicting the previous value (but scaled as you say). This issue is something I've seen again and again. Here is another example, and another, of this issue. Also, remember it is very easy to fool yourself by shifting the data by one. It is very likely you are simply shifting the poor prediction back in time and getting an overlap.

  • Thank you for your answer, you are definitely right about the poor performance. I am not sure about the shifting, but it's a good point. It turns out, that much simpler network performs much better (Dense layer instead of LSTM layer, with just 2 neurons), because it learns to predict the previous value. My original complicated network would probably need much more training to accomplish that. – asdf Jan 22 at 21:18
  • On related note, do you have any idea how to construct/train a network that would really memorize the data? From my experiments it looks like it would need to be unfeasibly complicated with extremely long training even on simple/small dataset. – asdf Jan 22 at 21:22
4

EDIT: After author's comments I do not believe this is the correct answer but I will keep it posted for posterity.

Great question and the answer is due to how the Time_generator works! Apparently instead of grabbing x,y pairs with the same index (e.g input x[0] to output target y[0]) it grabs target with offset 1 (so x[0] to y[1]).

Thus plotting y with offset 1 will produce the desired fit.

Code to simulate:

import keras 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x=np.random.uniform(0,10,size=41).reshape(-1,1)
x[::2]*=-1
y=x[1:]
x=x[:-1]
train_gen = keras.preprocessing.sequence.TimeseriesGenerator(
        x,
        y,
        length=1,
        sampling_rate=1,
        batch_size=1,
        shuffle=False
    )

model = keras.models.Sequential()
model.add(keras.layers.LSTM(100, input_shape=(1, 1), return_sequences=False))
model.add(keras.layers.Dense(1))


model.compile(
    loss="mse",
    optimizer="rmsprop",
    metrics=[keras.metrics.mean_squared_error]
)
model.optimizer.lr/=.1

history = model.fit_generator(
    train_gen,
    epochs=20,
    steps_per_epoch=100
)

Proper plotting:

y_pred = model.predict_generator(train_gen)
plot_points = 39
epochs = range(1, plot_points + 1)
pred_points = np.resize(y_pred[:plot_points], (plot_points,))

target_points = train_gen.targets[1:plot_points+1] #NOTICE DIFFERENT INDEXING HERE

plt.plot(epochs, pred_points, 'b', label='Predictions')
plt.plot(epochs, target_points, 'r', label='Targets')
plt.legend()
plt.show()

Output, Notice how the fit is no longer inverted and is mostly very accurate:

With proper offset on the <code>target_points</code>

This is how it looks when the offset is incorrect:

Without proper offset

  • 1
    Many thanks for your answer. You are right about the way TimeseriesGenerator works, I have already encountered that. But in my case the shift doesn't help much (please see the last edit of the question). IMHO it helps you because your data is strongly alternating (very regularly changes the sign), so just shifting by one "phase" nearly aligns the graphs. Therefore I am a bit skeptical, the shift solves my problem. – asdf Jan 18 at 22:17
  • Ah, I see. I thought the alternation is also implied in your data (at least the graph mostly suggests so). Combine that with the shift and you will no longer see the inversion. I know this doesn't fully answer why you don't overfit but at least explain an inversion problem. Btw what happens if you do length=2 instead of 1 for number of inputs to use? – tRosenflanz Jan 18 at 23:09
  • 1
    Yes, but fixing the inversion by shifting is IMHO just a fluke. It looks like it's working on the alternating data, but in reality it doesn't. I have added results with length=2 (see my latest edit) and the overall pattern is still the same although the predictions look a bit different. – asdf Jan 19 at 19:51

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