816

I am doing something where I realised I wanted to count how many /s I could find in a string, and then it struck me, that there were several ways to do it, but couldn't decide on what the best (or easiest) was.

At the moment I'm going with something like:

string source = "/once/upon/a/time/";
int count = source.Length - source.Replace("/", "").Length;

But I don't like it at all, any takers?

I don't really want to dig out RegEx for this, do I?

I know my string is going to have the term I'm searching for, so you can assume that...

Of course for strings where length > 1,

string haystack = "/once/upon/a/time";
string needle = "/";
int needleCount = ( haystack.Length - haystack.Replace(needle,"").Length ) / needle.Length;
  • 29
    +1: i must say that its a very different way of doing count. i am surprised at the bench mark test results :) – naveen Mar 15 '12 at 15:26
  • 4
    It's not so different... it's the typical way to implement this functionality in SQL: LEN(ColumnToCheck) - LEN(REPLACE(ColumnToCheck,"N","")). – Sheridan Jan 15 '13 at 16:02
  • 6
    As a matter of fact you should divide by "/".Length – Gerard Mar 20 '13 at 20:13
  • 3
    May I ask, what would your requirements say the count should be for the number of occurrences of "//" within "/////"? 2 or 4? – Les Jun 2 '14 at 13:11
  • 1
    using regex is probably the best way to go about it – Adam Higgins May 7 '15 at 22:52

30 Answers 30

952

If you're using .NET 3.5 you can do this in a one-liner with LINQ:

int count = source.Count(f => f == '/');

If you don't want to use LINQ you can do it with:

int count = source.Split('/').Length - 1;

You might be surprised to learn that your original technique seems to be about 30% faster than either of these! I've just done a quick benchmark with "/once/upon/a/time/" and the results are as follows:

Your original = 12s
source.Count = 19s
source.Split = 17s
foreach (from bobwienholt's answer) = 10s

(The times are for 50,000,000 iterations so you're unlikely to notice much difference in the real world.)

  • 27
    very surprised to hear my code was quicker than anything! – inspite Feb 12 '09 at 17:18
  • 6
    Yeah, VS hides LINQ extension methods on the string class. I guess they figured devs wouldn't want all those extension methods to show up on the string class. Probably a wise decision. – Judah Gabriel Himango Feb 15 '09 at 23:27
  • 10
    It's possible this behaviour is because VS2010 automatically includes System.Linq in new class files, VS2008 probably does not. The namespace needs to be in for the intellisense to work. – Sprague Jul 12 '12 at 8:13
  • 26
    Note that the Count and Split solutions will only work when you're counting characters. They will not work with strings, like the OP's solution does. – Peter Lillevold May 7 '14 at 9:03
  • 9
    This seems like the answer to a different question: "How would you count occurrences of a char within a string?" – Ben Aaronson Nov 28 '16 at 13:34
170
string source = "/once/upon/a/time/";
int count = 0;
foreach (char c in source) 
  if (c == '/') count++;

Has to be faster than the source.Replace() by itself.

  • 15
    You could gain a marginal improvement by switching to a for instead of a foreach, but only a tiny, tiny bit. – Mark Feb 12 '09 at 18:13
  • 15
    No. The question asks to count occurence of string, not character. – YukiSakura Dec 7 '15 at 9:47
  • 3
    This is counting characters in a string. The title is about counting strings in a string – Thomas Weller Aug 26 '16 at 14:11
  • 2
    @Mark Just tested it with a for loop and it was actually slower than using foreach. Could be because of bounds-checking? (Time was 1.65 sec vs 2.05 on 5 mil iterations.) – Measuring Dec 13 '16 at 9:05
  • 2
    While the question is asking for a string within a string, the example problem OP posted is actually just one character, in which case I would call this answer still a valid solution, as it shows a better way (char search instead of string search) to address the problem at hand. – Chad Feb 23 '17 at 21:39
130
int count = new Regex(Regex.Escape(needle)).Matches(haystack).Count;
  • 6
    +1 - In some cases you may want to add RegexOptions.IgnoreCase. – TrueWill Jun 23 '14 at 19:31
  • 3
    isn't this incredibly low? – Thomas Ayoub Mar 16 '15 at 15:31
  • 3
    Regex overhead is not ideal, plus "I don't really want to dig out RegEx for this, do I?" – Chad Feb 23 '17 at 21:40
  • might not want Regex.Escape(...) so new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(needle).Matches(haystack).Count; – barlop Jan 14 at 8:57
  • 1
    I went with this one because it can search for strings, not just characters. – James in Indy Jul 1 at 13:56
84

If you want to be able to search for whole strings, and not just characters:

src.Select((c, i) => src.Substring(i))
    .Count(sub => sub.StartsWith(target))

Read as "for each character in the string, take the rest of the string starting from that character as a substring; count it if it starts with the target string."

  • 1
    Not sure how I can explain it in a clearer way than the description given. What is confusing? – mqp Mar 8 '12 at 20:17
  • 55
    SUPER SLOW! Tried it on a page of html and it took about 2 minutes as versus other methods on this page that took 2 seconds. The answer was correct; it was just too slow to be usable. – JohnB Jun 20 '12 at 21:51
  • 2
    agreed, too slow. i'm a big fan of linq-style solutions but this one is just not viable. – Sprague Jul 12 '12 at 8:09
  • 5
    Note that the reason this is so slow is that it creates n strings, thus allocating roughly n^2/2 bytes. – Peter Crabtree Feb 7 '13 at 19:32
  • 6
    OutOfMemoryException is thrown for my 210000 chars of string. – ender Sep 13 '13 at 8:47
62

I've made some research and found that Richard Watson's solution is fastest in most cases. That's the table with results of every solution in the post (except those use Regex because it throws exceptions while parsing string like "test{test")

    Name      | Short/char |  Long/char | Short/short| Long/short |  Long/long |
    Inspite   |         134|        1853|          95|        1146|         671|
    LukeH_1   |         346|        4490|         N/A|         N/A|         N/A|
    LukeH_2   |         152|        1569|         197|        2425|        2171|
Bobwienholt   |         230|        3269|         N/A|         N/A|         N/A|
Richard Watson|          33|         298|         146|         737|         543|
StefanosKargas|         N/A|         N/A|         681|       11884|       12486|

You can see that in case of finding number of occurences of short substrings (1-5 characters) in short string(10-50 characters) the original algorithm is preferred.

Also, for multicharacter substring you should use the following code (based on Richard Watson's solution)

int count = 0, n = 0;

if(substring != "")
{
    while ((n = source.IndexOf(substring, n, StringComparison.InvariantCulture)) != -1)
    {
        n += substring.Length;
        ++count;
    }
}
  • I was about to add my own 'low level' solution (without creating substrings, using replace/split, or any Regex/Linq), but yours is possibly even better than mine (and at least shorter). Thanks! – Dan W Aug 3 '12 at 20:03
  • For the Regex solutions, add in a Regex.Escape(needle) – Thymine Jun 14 '13 at 14:57
  • 2
    Just to point out for others, search value needs to be checked if empty, otherwise you will get into an infinite loop. – WhoIsRich May 30 '14 at 11:43
  • 2
    Maybe it's just me, but for source="aaa" substring="aa" I expected to get back 2, not 1. To "fix" this, change n += substring.Length to n++ – ytoledano Sep 1 '16 at 20:35
  • you can add the overlapped flag to meet your case like this: overlapped=True;.... if(overlapped) {++n;} else {n += substring.Length;} – tsionyx Sep 2 '16 at 11:40
53

LINQ works on all collections, and since strings are just a collection of characters, how about this nice little one-liner:

var count = source.Count(c => c == '/');

Make sure you have using System.Linq; at the top of your code file, as .Count is an extension method from that namespace.

  • 5
    Is it really worth using var there? Is there any chance Count will be replaced with something that doesn't return an int? – Whatsit Feb 12 '09 at 19:01
  • 67
    @Whatsit: you can type 'var' with just your left hand while 'int' requires both hands ;) – Sean Bright Feb 12 '09 at 22:05
  • 7
    int letters all reside in home keys, while var doesn't. uh.. wait, i'm using Dvorak – Michael Buen May 7 '10 at 14:40
  • 2
    @BDotA Make sure you have a 'using System.Linq;' at the top of your file. Also, intellisense might hide the .Count call from you since it's a string. Even so, it will compile and run just fine. – Judah Gabriel Himango Jan 27 '12 at 19:25
  • 3
    @JudahGabrielHimango I would argue that var should be used especially when the variable type is obvious (and for brevity and consistency) – EriF89 Feb 22 at 15:03
48
string source = "/once/upon/a/time/";
int count = 0;
int n = 0;

while ((n = source.IndexOf('/', n)) != -1)
{
   n++;
   count++;
}

On my computer it's about 2 seconds faster than the for-every-character solution for 50 million iterations.

2013 revision:

Change the string to a char[] and iterate through that. Cuts a further second or two off the total time for 50m iterations!

char[] testchars = source.ToCharArray();
foreach (char c in testchars)
{
     if (c == '/')
         count++;
}

This is quicker still:

char[] testchars = source.ToCharArray();
int length = testchars.Length;
for (int n = 0; n < length; n++)
{
    if (testchars[n] == '/')
        count++;
}

For good measure, iterating from the end of the array to 0 seems to be the fastest, by about 5%.

int length = testchars.Length;
for (int n = length-1; n >= 0; n--)
{
    if (testchars[n] == '/')
        count++;
}

I was wondering why this could be and was Googling around (I recall something about reverse iterating being quicker), and came upon this SO question which annoyingly uses the string to char[] technique already. I think the reversal trick is new in this context, though.

What is the fastest way to iterate through individual characters in a string in C#?

  • 1
    You could put source.IndexOf('/', n + 1) and lose the n++ and the brackets of the while :) Also, put a variable string word = "/" instead of the character. – neeKo Dec 13 '12 at 4:59
  • 1
    Hey Niko, checkout new answers. Might be harder to make variable-length substring, though. – Richard Watson Feb 19 '13 at 12:14
  • I used something similar by stepping through the subtring; that's until I realized indexOf has a startIndex. I like the first solution the most as it's a good balance between speed and memory footprint. – Samir Banjanovic Sep 30 '13 at 18:39
  • 1
    I read somewhere that it's faster to iterate backwards because it's faster to compare a value to 0 – reggaeguitar Feb 25 '15 at 22:46
  • 1
    @shitpoet yup. If you look at the underlying code, it's a native call. public char[] toCharArray() {... System.arraycopy(value, 0, result, 0, value.length); ... } – Richard Watson Dec 18 '18 at 12:29
45

These both only work for single-character search terms...

countOccurences("the", "the answer is the answer");

int countOccurences(string needle, string haystack)
{
    return (haystack.Length - haystack.Replace(needle,"").Length) / needle.Length;
}

may turn out to be better for longer needles...

But there has to be a more elegant way. :)

  • To account for multi-character replacements. Without it, counting "the" in "the test is the key" would return 6. – ZombieSheep Feb 12 '09 at 16:06
  • Benchmarked & compared this with the string.Split-way - works about 1.5 times faster. Kudos. – Alex Mar 9 '14 at 22:55
19

Edit:

source.Split('/').Length-1
  • 2
    This is what I do. And source.Split(new[]{"//"}, StringSplitOptions.None).Count - 1 for multi-character separators. – bzlm Oct 12 '09 at 10:05
  • 4
    This would perform at least n string allocations on the heap, plus (possibly) few array re-sizes - and all this just to get the count? Extremely inefficient, doesn't scale well and should never be used in any important code. – Zar Shardan Dec 13 '12 at 4:16
15

In C#, a nice String SubString counter is this unexpectedly tricky fellow:

public static int CCount(String haystack, String needle)
{
    return haystack.Split(new[] { needle }, StringSplitOptions.None).Length - 1;
}
  • 1
    Nice solution - and working for string too (not just char)! – ChriPf Apr 19 '16 at 6:20
  • Thanks, it's all too easy to forget some of the subtleties of string handling when swapping languages - like most of us have to these days! – Dave Apr 28 '16 at 13:12
  • 1
    -1 because: Do you know the difference between Count() and Count or Length ? If someone is using Count() instead of Count or Length I get triggered. Count() creates IEnumerator then goes thru all occurences of the IEnumerable whereas Count or Length are already set properties of the object which already hold the count you want without the need to iterate over all the elements. – aeroson Feb 13 '17 at 19:04
  • Good spot, and what's weird is that in my library, from where I took the function, I am using "Length". Edited! – Dave Feb 14 '17 at 8:51
14
Regex.Matches(input,  Regex.Escape("stringToMatch")).Count
  • 1
    This is not correct if input containt regex special chars i.e | There needs to be a Regex.Escape(input) – Esben Skov Pedersen Apr 24 '15 at 7:10
  • 1
    Actually the stringToMatch needs escaping, not the input. – Theodor Zoulias May 28 at 17:41
  • Right you are. Fixed it. – cederlof May 29 at 7:24
12
private int CountWords(string text, string word) {
    int count = (text.Length - text.Replace(word, "").Length) / word.Length;
    return count;
}

Because the original solution, was the fastest for chars, I suppose it will also be for strings. So here is my contribution.

For the context: I was looking for words like 'failed' and 'succeeded' in a log file.

Gr, Ben

  • 2
    Just don't pass an empty string for the "word" variable (division by zero error). – Andrew Jens Mar 9 '18 at 2:15
11
string s = "65 fght 6565 4665 hjk";
int count = 0;
foreach (Match m in Regex.Matches(s, "65"))
  count++;
  • 20
    or Regex.Matches(s, "65").Count ^_^ – Meta Jun 28 '11 at 7:29
  • Works not for every string. Try to search "++" in "abc++def++xyz" – marsh-wiggle Apr 30 at 21:01
7

For anyone wanting a ready to use String extension method,

here is what I use which was based on the best of the posted answers:

public static class StringExtension
{    
    /// <summary> Returns the number of occurences of a string within a string, optional comparison allows case and culture control. </summary>
    public static int Occurrences(this System.String input, string value, StringComparison stringComparisonType = StringComparison.Ordinal)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) return 0;

        int count    = 0;
        int position = 0;

        while ((position = input.IndexOf(value, position, stringComparisonType)) != -1)
        {
            position += value.Length;
            count    += 1;
        }

        return count;
    }

    /// <summary> Returns the number of occurences of a single character within a string. </summary>
    public static int Occurrences(this System.String input, char value)
    {
        int count = 0;
        foreach (char c in input) if (c == value) count += 1;
        return count;
    }
}
  • Won't the second method go boom if the string passed in is null or empty? Purely from a style point of view, what are you defining the input as System.String rather than just string? – Nodoid Apr 29 at 11:25
7
public static int GetNumSubstringOccurrences(string text, string search)
{
    int num = 0;
    int pos = 0;

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(text) && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(search))
    {
        while ((pos = text.IndexOf(search, pos)) > -1)
        {
            num ++;
            pos += search.Length;
        }
    }
    return num;
}
5

I think the easiest way to do this is to use the Regular Expressions. This way you can get the same split count as you could using myVar.Split('x') but in a multiple character setting.

string myVar = "do this to count the number of words in my wording so that I can word it up!";
int count = Regex.Split(myVar, "word").Length;
3
string search = "/string";
var occurrences = (regex.Match(search, @"\/")).Count;

This will count each time the program finds "/s" exactly (case sensitive) and the number of occurrences of this will be stored in the variable "occurrences"

2

A generic function for occurrences of strings:

public int getNumberOfOccurencies(String inputString, String checkString)
{
    if (checkString.Length > inputString.Length || checkString.Equals("")) { return 0; }
    int lengthDifference = inputString.Length - checkString.Length;
    int occurencies = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < lengthDifference; i++) {
        if (inputString.Substring(i, checkString.Length).Equals(checkString)) { occurencies++; i += checkString.Length - 1; } }
    return occurencies;
}
  • 2
    This creates a HUGE number of temporary strings and makes the garbage collector work very hard. – EricLaw Jun 29 '15 at 16:42
2
string source = "/once/upon/a/time/";
int count = 0, n = 0;
while ((n = source.IndexOf('/', n) + 1) != 0) count++;

A variation on Richard Watson's answer, slightly faster with improving efficiency the more times the char occurs in the string, and less code!

Though I must say, without extensively testing every scenario, I did see a very significant speed improvement by using:

int count = 0;
for (int n = 0; n < source.Length; n++) if (source[n] == '/') count++;
2
            var conditionalStatement = conditionSetting.Value;

            //order of replace matters, remove == before =, incase of ===
            conditionalStatement = conditionalStatement.Replace("==", "~").Replace("!=", "~").Replace('=', '~').Replace('!', '~').Replace('>', '~').Replace('<', '~').Replace(">=", "~").Replace("<=", "~");

            var listOfValidConditions = new List<string>() { "!=", "==", ">", "<", ">=", "<=" };

            if (conditionalStatement.Count(x => x == '~') != 1)
            {
                result.InvalidFieldList.Add(new KeyFieldData(batch.DECurrentField, "The IsDoubleKeyCondition does not contain a supported conditional statement. Contact System Administrator."));
                result.Status = ValidatorStatus.Fail;
                return result;
            }

Needed to do something similar to test conditional statements from a string.

Replaced what i was looking for with a single character and counted the instances of the single character.

Obviously the single character you're using will need to be checked to not exist in the string before this happens to avoid incorrect counts.

2

String in string:

Find "etc" in " .. JD JD JD JD etc. and etc. JDJDJDJDJDJDJDJD and etc."

var strOrigin = " .. JD JD JD JD etc. and etc. JDJDJDJDJDJDJDJD and etc.";
var searchStr = "etc";
int count = (strOrigin.Length - strOrigin.Replace(searchStr, "").Length)/searchStr.Length.

Check performance before discarding this one as unsound/clumsy...

2

I felt that we were lacking certain kinds of sub string counting, like unsafe byte-by-byte comparisons. I put together the original poster's method and any methods I could think of.

These are the string extensions I made.

namespace Example
{
    using System;
    using System.Text;

    public static class StringExtensions
    {
        public static int CountSubstr(this string str, string substr)
        {
            return (str.Length - str.Replace(substr, "").Length) / substr.Length;
        }

        public static int CountSubstr(this string str, char substr)
        {
            return (str.Length - str.Replace(substr.ToString(), "").Length);
        }

        public static int CountSubstr2(this string str, string substr)
        {
            int substrlen = substr.Length;
            int lastIndex = str.IndexOf(substr, 0, StringComparison.Ordinal);
            int count = 0;
            while (lastIndex != -1)
            {
                ++count;
                lastIndex = str.IndexOf(substr, lastIndex + substrlen, StringComparison.Ordinal);
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static int CountSubstr2(this string str, char substr)
        {
            int lastIndex = str.IndexOf(substr, 0);
            int count = 0;
            while (lastIndex != -1)
            {
                ++count;
                lastIndex = str.IndexOf(substr, lastIndex + 1);
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static int CountChar(this string str, char substr)
        {
            int length = str.Length;
            int count = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
                if (str[i] == substr)
                    ++count;

            return count;
        }

        public static int CountChar2(this string str, char substr)
        {
            int count = 0;
            foreach (var c in str)
                if (c == substr)
                    ++count;

            return count;
        }

        public static unsafe int CountChar3(this string str, char substr)
        {
            int length = str.Length;
            int count = 0;
            fixed (char* chars = str)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
                    if (*(chars + i) == substr)
                        ++count;
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static unsafe int CountChar4(this string str, char substr)
        {
            int length = str.Length;
            int count = 0;
            fixed (char* chars = str)
            {
                for (int i = length - 1; i >= 0; --i)
                    if (*(chars + i) == substr)
                        ++count;
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static unsafe int CountSubstr3(this string str, string substr)
        {
            int length = str.Length;
            int substrlen = substr.Length;
            int count = 0;
            fixed (char* strc = str)
            {
                fixed (char* substrc = substr)
                {
                    int n = 0;

                    for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
                    {
                        if (*(strc + i) == *(substrc + n))
                        {
                            ++n;
                            if (n == substrlen)
                            {
                                ++count;
                                n = 0;
                            }
                        }
                        else
                            n = 0;
                    }
                }
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static int CountSubstr3(this string str, char substr)
        {
            return CountSubstr3(str, substr.ToString());
        }

        public static unsafe int CountSubstr4(this string str, string substr)
        {
            int length = str.Length;
            int substrLastIndex = substr.Length - 1;
            int count = 0;
            fixed (char* strc = str)
            {
                fixed (char* substrc = substr)
                {
                    int n = substrLastIndex;

                    for (int i = length - 1; i >= 0; --i)
                    {
                        if (*(strc + i) == *(substrc + n))
                        {
                            if (--n == -1)
                            {
                                ++count;
                                n = substrLastIndex;
                            }
                        }
                        else
                            n = substrLastIndex;
                    }
                }
            }

            return count;
        }

        public static int CountSubstr4(this string str, char substr)
        {
            return CountSubstr4(str, substr.ToString());
        }
    }
}

Followed by the test code...

static void Main()
{
    const char matchA = '_';
    const string matchB = "and";
    const string matchC = "muchlongerword";
    const string testStrA = "_and_d_e_banna_i_o___pfasd__and_d_e_banna_i_o___pfasd_";
    const string testStrB = "and sdf and ans andeians andano ip and and sdf and ans andeians andano ip and";
    const string testStrC =
        "muchlongerword amuchlongerworsdfmuchlongerwordsdf jmuchlongerworijv muchlongerword sdmuchlongerword dsmuchlongerword";
    const int testSize = 1000000;
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountSubstr('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountSubstr2('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountSubstr3('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountSubstr4('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountChar('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountChar2('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountChar3('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrA.CountChar4('_'));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrB.CountSubstr("and"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrB.CountSubstr2("and"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrB.CountSubstr3("and"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrB.CountSubstr4("and"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrC.CountSubstr("muchlongerword"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrC.CountSubstr2("muchlongerword"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrC.CountSubstr3("muchlongerword"));
    Console.WriteLine(testStrC.CountSubstr4("muchlongerword"));
    var timer = new Stopwatch();
    timer.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountSubstr(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS1 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrB.CountSubstr(matchB);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS1 and: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrC.CountSubstr(matchC);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS1 mlw: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountSubstr2(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS2 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrB.CountSubstr2(matchB);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS2 and: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrC.CountSubstr2(matchC);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS2 mlw: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountSubstr3(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS3 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrB.CountSubstr3(matchB);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS3 and: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrC.CountSubstr3(matchC);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS3 mlw: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountSubstr4(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS4 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrB.CountSubstr4(matchB);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS4 and: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrC.CountSubstr4(matchC);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CS4 mlw: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountChar(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CC1 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountChar2(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CC2 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountChar3(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CC3 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

    timer.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < testSize; ++i)
        testStrA.CountChar4(matchA);
    timer.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("CC4 chr: " + timer.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");
}

Results: CSX corresponds with CountSubstrX and CCX corresponds with CountCharX. "chr" searches a string for '_', "and" searches a string for "and", and "mlw" searches a string for "muchlongerword"

CS1 chr: 824.123ms
CS1 and: 586.1893ms
CS1 mlw: 486.5414ms
CS2 chr: 127.8941ms
CS2 and: 806.3918ms
CS2 mlw: 497.318ms
CS3 chr: 201.8896ms
CS3 and: 124.0675ms
CS3 mlw: 212.8341ms
CS4 chr: 81.5183ms
CS4 and: 92.0615ms
CS4 mlw: 116.2197ms
CC1 chr: 66.4078ms
CC2 chr: 64.0161ms
CC3 chr: 65.9013ms
CC4 chr: 65.8206ms

And finally, I had a file with 3.6 million characters. It was "derp adfderdserp dfaerpderp deasderp" repeated 100,000 times. I searched for "derp" inside the file with the above methods 100 times these results.

CS1Derp: 1501.3444ms
CS2Derp: 1585.797ms
CS3Derp: 376.0937ms
CS4Derp: 271.1663ms

So my 4th method is definitely the winner, but, realistically, if a 3.6 million character file 100 times only took 1586ms as the worse case, then all of this is quite negligible.

By the way, I also scanned for the 'd' char in the 3.6 million character file with 100 times CountSubstr and CountChar methods. Results...

CS1  d : 2606.9513ms
CS2  d : 339.7942ms
CS3  d : 960.281ms
CS4  d : 233.3442ms
CC1  d : 302.4122ms
CC2  d : 280.7719ms
CC3  d : 299.1125ms
CC4  d : 292.9365ms

The original posters method is very bad for single character needles in a large haystack according to this.

Note: All values were updated to Release version output. I accidentally forgot to build on Release mode upon the first time I posted this. Some of my statements have been amended.

1
string Name = "Very good nice one is very good but is very good nice one this is called the term";
bool valid=true;
int count = 0;
int k=0;
int m = 0;
while (valid)
{
    k = Name.Substring(m,Name.Length-m).IndexOf("good");
    if (k != -1)
    {
        count++;
        m = m + k + 4;
    }
    else
        valid = false;
}
Console.WriteLine(count + " Times accures");
1
string s = "HOWLYH THIS ACTUALLY WORKSH WOWH";
int count = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
   if (s[i] == 'H') count++;

It just checks every character in the string, if the character is the character you are searching for, add one to count.

1

If you check out this webpage, 15 different ways of doing this are benchmarked, including using parallel loops.

The fastest way appears to be using either a single threaded for-loop (if you have .Net version < 4.0) or a parallel.for loop (if using .Net > 4.0 with thousands of checks).

Assuming "ss" is your Search String, "ch" is your character array (if you have more than one char you're looking for), here's the basic gist of the code that had the fastest run time single threaded:

for (int x = 0; x < ss.Length; x++)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < ch.Length; y++)
    {
        for (int a = 0; a < ss[x].Length; a++ )
        {
        if (ss[x][a] == ch[y])
            //it's found. DO what you need to here.
        }
    }
}

The benchmark source code is provided too so you can run your own tests.

1

Thought I would throw my extension method into the ring (see comments for more info). I have not done any formal bench marking, but I think it has to be very fast for most scenarios.

EDIT: OK - so this SO question got me to wondering how the performance of our current implementation would stack up against some of the solutions presented here. I decided to do a little bench marking and found that our solution was very much in line with the performance of the solution provided by Richard Watson up until you are doing aggressive searching with large strings (100 Kb +), large substrings (32 Kb +) and many embedded repetitions (10K +). At that point our solution was around 2X to 4X slower. Given this and the fact that we really like the solution presented by Richard Watson, we have refactored our solution accordingly. I just wanted to make this available for anyone that might benefit from it.

Our original solution:

    /// <summary>
    /// Counts the number of occurrences of the specified substring within
    /// the current string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="s">The current string.</param>
    /// <param name="substring">The substring we are searching for.</param>
    /// <param name="aggressiveSearch">Indicates whether or not the algorithm 
    /// should be aggressive in its search behavior (see Remarks). Default 
    /// behavior is non-aggressive.</param>
    /// <remarks>This algorithm has two search modes - aggressive and 
    /// non-aggressive. When in aggressive search mode (aggressiveSearch = 
    /// true), the algorithm will try to match at every possible starting 
    /// character index within the string. When false, all subsequent 
    /// character indexes within a substring match will not be evaluated. 
    /// For example, if the string was 'abbbc' and we were searching for 
    /// the substring 'bb', then aggressive search would find 2 matches 
    /// with starting indexes of 1 and 2. Non aggressive search would find 
    /// just 1 match with starting index at 1. After the match was made, 
    /// the non aggressive search would attempt to make it's next match 
    /// starting at index 3 instead of 2.</remarks>
    /// <returns>The count of occurrences of the substring within the string.</returns>
    public static int CountOccurrences(this string s, string substring, 
        bool aggressiveSearch = false)
    {
        // if s or substring is null or empty, substring cannot be found in s
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(substring))
            return 0;

        // if the length of substring is greater than the length of s,
        // substring cannot be found in s
        if (substring.Length > s.Length)
            return 0;

        var sChars = s.ToCharArray();
        var substringChars = substring.ToCharArray();
        var count = 0;
        var sCharsIndex = 0;

        // substring cannot start in s beyond following index
        var lastStartIndex = sChars.Length - substringChars.Length;

        while (sCharsIndex <= lastStartIndex)
        {
            if (sChars[sCharsIndex] == substringChars[0])
            {
                // potential match checking
                var match = true;
                var offset = 1;
                while (offset < substringChars.Length)
                {
                    if (sChars[sCharsIndex + offset] != substringChars[offset])
                    {
                        match = false;
                        break;
                    }
                    offset++;
                }
                if (match)
                {
                    count++;
                    // if aggressive, just advance to next char in s, otherwise, 
                    // skip past the match just found in s
                    sCharsIndex += aggressiveSearch ? 1 : substringChars.Length;
                }
                else
                {
                    // no match found, just move to next char in s
                    sCharsIndex++;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                // no match at current index, move along
                sCharsIndex++;
            }
        }

        return count;
    }

And here is our revised solution:

    /// <summary>
    /// Counts the number of occurrences of the specified substring within
    /// the current string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="s">The current string.</param>
    /// <param name="substring">The substring we are searching for.</param>
    /// <param name="aggressiveSearch">Indicates whether or not the algorithm 
    /// should be aggressive in its search behavior (see Remarks). Default 
    /// behavior is non-aggressive.</param>
    /// <remarks>This algorithm has two search modes - aggressive and 
    /// non-aggressive. When in aggressive search mode (aggressiveSearch = 
    /// true), the algorithm will try to match at every possible starting 
    /// character index within the string. When false, all subsequent 
    /// character indexes within a substring match will not be evaluated. 
    /// For example, if the string was 'abbbc' and we were searching for 
    /// the substring 'bb', then aggressive search would find 2 matches 
    /// with starting indexes of 1 and 2. Non aggressive search would find 
    /// just 1 match with starting index at 1. After the match was made, 
    /// the non aggressive search would attempt to make it's next match 
    /// starting at index 3 instead of 2.</remarks>
    /// <returns>The count of occurrences of the substring within the string.</returns>
    public static int CountOccurrences(this string s, string substring, 
        bool aggressiveSearch = false)
    {
        // if s or substring is null or empty, substring cannot be found in s
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(substring))
            return 0;

        // if the length of substring is greater than the length of s,
        // substring cannot be found in s
        if (substring.Length > s.Length)
            return 0;

        int count = 0, n = 0;
        while ((n = s.IndexOf(substring, n, StringComparison.InvariantCulture)) != -1)
        {
            if (aggressiveSearch)
                n++;
            else
                n += substring.Length;
            count++;
        }

        return count;
    }
1

My initial take gave me something like:

public static int CountOccurrences(string original, string substring)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(substring))
        return 0;
    if (substring.Length == 1)
        return CountOccurrences(original, substring[0]);
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(original) ||
        substring.Length > original.Length)
        return 0;
    int substringCount = 0;
    for (int charIndex = 0; charIndex < original.Length; charIndex++)
    {
        for (int subCharIndex = 0, secondaryCharIndex = charIndex; subCharIndex < substring.Length && secondaryCharIndex < original.Length; subCharIndex++, secondaryCharIndex++)
        {
            if (substring[subCharIndex] != original[secondaryCharIndex])
                goto continueOuter;
        }
        if (charIndex + substring.Length > original.Length)
            break;
        charIndex += substring.Length - 1;
        substringCount++;
    continueOuter:
        ;
    }
    return substringCount;
}

public static int CountOccurrences(string original, char @char)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(original))
        return 0;
    int substringCount = 0;
    for (int charIndex = 0; charIndex < original.Length; charIndex++)
        if (@char == original[charIndex])
            substringCount++;
    return substringCount;
}

The needle in a haystack approach using replace and division yields 21+ seconds whereas this takes about 15.2.

Edit after adding a bit which would add substring.Length - 1 to the charIndex (like it should), it's at 11.6 seconds.

Edit 2: I used a string which had 26 two-character strings, here are the times updated to the same sample texts:

Needle in a haystack (OP's version): 7.8 Seconds

Suggested mechanism: 4.6 seconds.

Edit 3: Adding the single character corner-case, it went to 1.2 seconds.

Edit 4: For context: 50 million iterations were used.

1
str="aaabbbbjjja";
int count = 0;
int size = str.Length;

string[] strarray = new string[size];
for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
{
    strarray[i] = str.Substring(i, 1);
}
Array.Sort(strarray);
str = "";
for (int i = 0; i < strarray.Length - 1; i++)
{

    if (strarray[i] == strarray[i + 1])
    {

        count++;
    }
    else
    {
        count++;
        str = str + strarray[i] + count;
        count = 0;
    }

}
count++;
str = str + strarray[strarray.Length - 1] + count;

This is for counting the character occurance. For this example output will be "a4b4j3"

  • 2
    Not quite 'counting occurrences of a string' more counting characters - how about a way of specifying what the string to match was Narenda? – Paul Sullivan Dec 9 '11 at 13:51
  • 1
    int count = 0; string str = "we have foo and foo please count foo in this"; string stroccurance="foo"; string[] strarray = str.Split(' '); Array.Sort(strarray); str = ""; for (int i = 0; i < strarray.Length - 1; i++) { if (strarray[i] == stroccurance) { count++; } } str = "Number of occurenance for " +stroccurance + " is " + count; Through this you can count any string occurance in this example I am counting the occurance of "foo" and it will give me the output 3. – Narendra Kumar Dec 15 '11 at 7:10
1

For the case of a string delimiter (not for the char case, as the subject says):
string source = "@@@once@@@upon@@@a@@@time@@@";
int count = source.Split(new[] { "@@@" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Length - 1;

The poster's original source value's ("/once/upon/a/time/") natural delimiter is a char '/' and responses do explain source.Split(char[]) option though...

0

using System.Linq;

int CountOf => "A::B C::D".Split("::").Length - 1;

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