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Inside my application I've created a number of ES6 "classes" in a way that each defines it's properties together with custom setters, inside of which - before assigning the property - it's running a field-specific validator. Now, as models may have the same fields available and I don't want to duplicate the code of validators, I planned to import models as needed and just reuse validators as I'm exposing them via class' static property (check the code for better understandig). Unfortunately this leads to circular dependencies and as a results - breaks the whole thing.

I understand what is happening and why, but I can't find a way to solve it. I tried answers provided on stack and went through a number of articles from Google but without luck. I tried moving exports before require, declaring my structures as var to use hoisting, declare empty structures before exports and define them after and many, many more. I know I can solve this case by moving common validators to a separate file and import it in both modules but that's not what I'm looking for as this is not exactly solving the problem for the future as I may need other properties/methods to be exposed. Plus - it just doesn't seem right: ClassA properties' validators should stick with ClassA "domain" and vice versa.

Now the code. This is simplified, but working version of what I'm using:

// ClassA.js:
const { ClassB } = require('./ClassB');

// This prints: ClassA inside ClassB: undefined
console.log('ClassB inside ClassA:', ClassB);

const _validators = {
    // This is validator defined in ClassA...
    property_a: (value) => true,

    // ...And this one is reusing a validator from ClassB
    // I'm getting: TypeError: Cannot read property 'VALIDATORS' of undefined
    property_b: ClassB.VALIDATORS.property_b,
};

exports.ClassA = class ClassA {
    constructor() {
        // Here comes the code defining descriptors for each property 
        // and running the property-specific validator inside 
        // a field setter
    }

    // Expose class-specific validators as class property
    static get VALIDATORS () {
        return _validators;
    }
};
// ClassB.js:
const { ClassA } = require('./ClassA');

console.log('ClassA inside ClassB:', ClassA);

const _validators = {
    // This is validator defined in ClassA...
    property_a: ClassA.VALIDATORS.property_a,

    // ...And this one is reusing a validator from ClassB
    property_b: (value) => true,
};

exports.ClassB = class ClassB {
    constructor() {
        // Here comes the code defining descriptors for each property 
        // and running the property-specific validator inside 
        // a field setter
    }

    // Expose class-specific validators as class property
    static get VALIDATORS () {
        return _validators;
    }
};
// app.js
const { ClassA } = require('./ClassA');
const { ClassB } = require('./ClassB');

console.log(ClassA, ClassB);

Because of circular imports ClassA inside ClassB is undefined (although according to articles I've read it should be {}) what is visible on console.log and causing the error I'm getting:

TypeError: Cannot read property 'VALIDATORS' of undefined
    at Object.<anonymous> (/repository/ClassB.js:6:24)

How can I redefine/rearrange the code to get this working, without creating another, common file?

Any help would be appreciated.

I'm using: Node.js v.11.6.0

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    Create another common file that each can include common stuff. That is the solution. Change your design. This type of design does not work in node.js. – jfriend00 Jan 15 '19 at 20:35
  • @jfriend00 thanks for the suggestion, but as I mentioned in my question I want to avoid this. For once - it's not "elegant" but what is more important it is very hard to maintain in the long run. I used this technique before and in bigger projects, with many dependencies this is a dead end. You are end up with creating more and more "higher level" common files. That's not what I'm looking for. – Przemysław Czumaj Jan 15 '19 at 20:47
  • 2
    Well, you CAN'T have circular dependencies like this. The way to solve it is to restructure what code is in what files. If you say you won't do that, then we can't help you. I read your desired to avoid a new file in the question. Can't keep your code structure the way it is and solve this problem. You have to restructure. I guess we can not help you. – jfriend00 Jan 15 '19 at 21:02
  • "it just doesn't seem right: ClassA properties' validators should stick with ClassA "domain" and vice versa." - well yes, it definitely doesn't seem right that ClassA exposes ClassB.VALIDATORS.property_b and vice versa. Why are you doing this? – Bergi Jan 16 '19 at 9:27
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I know I can solve this case by moving common validators to a separate file and import it in both modules but that's not what I'm looking for.

This is precisely what you need. Do it. There is nothing wrong with it. In your current demo code, the two _validators object even look identical, all their properties are the same - you wouldn't even need to create two distinct custom objects with specific properties additional to the shared ones.

Plus - it just doesn't seem right: ClassA properties' validators should stick with ClassA "domain" and vice versa.

What doesn't seem right is that ClassA exposes ClassB.VALIDATORS.property_b and vice versa. Why are you doing this? Are the two classes more tightly coupled than they should be? It looks like they both have exactly the same property names.

Also, if property_b will contain a Class_B instance that should be validated and you want to declare the validation code with Class_B, then simply give Class_B a .validate() method and call it from the property validator that you did define in the Class_A file.

I tried moving exports before require, declaring my structures as var to use hoisting, and many, many more.

Well if you look at the two object literals

const a_validators = {
    property_a: (value) => true,
    property_b: b_validators.property_b,
};
const b_validators = {
    property_b: (value) => true,
    property_a: a_validators.property_a,
};

there is absolutely no way to arrange their evaluation order so that both will have the desired result. You must split them up.

The other solution is declare them half-empty and lazily initialise the rest when both modules have been loaded. You can do this with getters - and when overwriting module.exports instead of creating properties on it, you also need to place the require() call inside the getter.

const _validators = {
    property_a: (value) => true,

    get property_b() {
        const { ClassB } = require('./ClassB');
        return ClassB.VALIDATORS.property_b;
    }
};
// and vice versa

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