82

I have a server app and sometimes, when the client tries to connect, I get the following error:

enter image description here

NOTE: the "couldn't get stream from client or login failed" is a text that's added by me in catch statement

and the line at which it stops ( sThread : line 96 ) is :

tcpClient = (TcpClient)client;
clientStream = tcpClient.GetStream();
sr = new StreamReader(clientStream);
sw = new StreamWriter(clientStream);

// line 96:                 
a = sr.ReadLine();

What may be causing this problem? Note that it doesn't happen all the time

16 Answers 16

48

This error usually means that the target machine is running, but the service that you're trying to connect to is not available. (Either it stopped, crashed, or is busy with another request.)

In English: The connection to the machine (remote host/server/PC that the service runs at) was made but since the service was not available on that machine, the machine didn't know what to do with the request.

If the connection to the machine was not available, you'd see a different error. I forget what it is, but it's along the lines of "Service Unreachable" or "Unavailable".

Edit - added

It IS possible that this is being caused by a firewall blocking the port, but given that you say it's intermittent ("sometimes when the client tries to connect"), that's very unlikely. I didn't include that originally because I had ruled it out mentally before replying.

  • 1
    the thing is that when i start the server there are some like 50 client connecting to my server . I've implemented kind of a wait signal when accepting a client .. something like while (Program.waitToFinishLoginAtClient == true && ajutor < 30) { Thread.Sleep(300); ajutor++; } client = this.tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient(); Program.waitToFinishLoginAtClient = true; ........... and Program.waitToFinishAtClient gets modified in the thread that contains the client – Alex Mar 24 '11 at 14:59
  • could this "wait" be the problem ? – Alex Mar 24 '11 at 15:02
  • 1
    should i just let it be ? no wait ? – Alex Mar 24 '11 at 15:03
  • I think the Wait is the problem. I don't know enough of your code to be sure, but that sure sounds likely. Just curious as to whether you built your own service the "hard way" or if you're using WCF or even Remoting for this... – David Mar 24 '11 at 15:07
  • Based on the little nit of code here, it looks to me like the "wait" problem could be avoided if it was inside a separate thread for each conneciton. Just in case that guess is right, here's an example of a multi-threaded TCP Service with multi-threading that may help you: switchonthecode.com/tutorials/… – David Mar 24 '11 at 15:10
140

I received this error when calling a web-service. The issue was also related to transport level security. I could call the web-service through a website project, but when reusing the same code in a test project I would get a WebException that contained this message. Adding the following line before making the call resolved the issue:

System.Net.ServicePointManager.SecurityProtocol = SecurityProtocolType.Tls | SecurityProtocolType.Tls11 | SecurityProtocolType.Tls12;

Edit

System.Net.ServicePointManager.SecurityProtocol - This property selects the version of the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol to use for new connections that use the Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) scheme only; existing connections are not changed.

I believe the SecurityProtocol configuration is important during the TLS handshake when selecting the protocol version.

TLS handshake - This protocol is used to exchange all the information required by both sides for the exchange of the actual application data by TLS.

ClientHello - A client sends a ClientHello message specifying the highest TLS protocol version it supports ...

ServerHello - The server responds with a ServerHello message, containing the chosen protocol version ... The chosen protocol version should be the highest that both the client and server support. For example, if the client supports TLS version 1.1 and the server supports version 1.2, version 1.1 should be selected; version 1.2 should not be selected.

  • 5
    this saved me! thanks man. in my debugger I'm trying to call an https service while testing and was having the issue the OP was having. – Blair Holmes May 8 '17 at 16:17
  • 4
    Do we know more about how/why this works? I've been struggling with a PostAsync call and this does appear to fix my error, too. Glad it worked, but I'd also like to know why. – Kevin Matlock Aug 17 '17 at 15:57
  • 1
    @HansVonn Thanks for this! Saved me a ton of time - In regards as to why it works It's just limiting the TLS version you are using when you connect. – confusedandamused Aug 21 '17 at 14:31
  • 1
    Can't believe this got me once again! Thanks – Sergio A. Jan 26 at 18:12
  • 1
    THANK YOU! This was driving me nuts. – mknopf Feb 19 at 15:14
27

My specific case scenario was that the Azure app service had the minimum TLS version changed to 1.2

I don't know if that's the default from now on, but changing it back to 1.0 made it work.

You can access the setting inside "SSL Settings".

  • 6
    Oh my god THANK YOU SO MUCH! I've been stuck on this for sooo long, and I checked the SSL settings of the web app, and the minimum was set to 1.2 instead of 1.0. When I changed it back to 1.0 and restarted the web app, it worked! Thank you so much! – Mason Aug 2 '18 at 6:19
  • 1
    Thanks a lot, @hugo-hilário, amazingly it worked for me as well! How on earth did you manage to find such a tricky solution! :D – hosjay Aug 13 '18 at 2:19
  • @hosjay it was a hell for me as well :) – Hugo Hilário Aug 14 '18 at 10:27
  • 2
    Saved my day mate! – Nitesh May 8 at 11:05
15

Not sure which of the fixes in these blog posts helped, but one of them sorted this issue for me ...

http://briancaos.wordpress.com/2012/07/06/unable-to-read-data-from-the-transport-connection-the-connection-was-closed/

The trick that helped me was to quit using a WebRequest and use a HttpWebRequest instead. The HttpWebRequest allows me to play with 3 important settings:

and

http://briancaos.wordpress.com/2012/06/15/an-existing-connection-was-forcibly-closed-by-the-remote-host/

  • STEP 1: Disable KeepAlive
  • STEP 2: Set ProtocolVersion to Version10
  • STEP 3: Limiting the number of service points
  • This answer is what solved this same problem for me. I turned off 'Keep Alive' in the Http Response Headers section in IIS7 – drzounds Apr 21 '16 at 12:46
  • I should add that I also had to add this code to the Reference.cs for the web service that was having that behavior. protected override System.Net.WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri) { System.Net.HttpWebRequest webRequest = (System.Net.HttpWebRequest)base.GetWebRequest(uri); webRequest.KeepAlive = false; return webRequest; } – drzounds Apr 21 '16 at 14:56
  • This answer seems to have been helpful, but as it stands, it is a link only answer. Please consider adding the relevant content from the links to your question. – Clint Nov 29 '18 at 17:11
10

Calls to HTTPS services from one of our servers were also throwing the "Unable to read data from the transport connection : An existing connection was forcibly closed" exception. HTTP service, though, worked fine. Used Wireshark to see that it was a TLS handshake Failure. Ended up being that the cipher suite on the server needed to be updated.

  • This is what was happening with me. A was sendind a expired certificate to a SSL conection. A renew the certificate and worked. – Guilherme de Jesus Santos Sep 13 '16 at 19:14
4

This won't help for intermittent issues, but may be useful for other people with a similar problem.

I had cloned a VM and started it up on a different network with a new IP address but not changed the bindings in IIS. Fiddler was showing me "Unable to read data from the transport connection: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host" and IE was telling me "Turn on TLS 1.0, TLS 1.1, and TLS 1.2 in Advanced settings". Changing the binding to the new IP address solved it for me.

2

For some reason, the connection to the server was lost. It could be that the server explicitly closed the connection, or a bug on the server caused it to be closed unexpectedly. Or something between the client and the server (a switch or router) dropped the connection.

It might be server code that caused the problem, and it might not be. If you have access to the server code, you can put some debugging in there to tell you when client connections are closed. That might give you some indication of when and why connections are being dropped.

On the client, you have to write your code to take into account the possibility of the server failing at any time. That's just the way it is: network connections are inherently unreliable.

2

I get that problem in the past. I'm using PostgreSQL and when I run my program, sometimes it connects and sometimes it throws an error like that.

When I experiment with my code, I put my Connection code at the very first line below the public Form. Here is an example:

BEFORE:

    public Form1()
        {
        //HERE LIES SOME CODES FOR RESIZING MY CONTROLS DURING RUNTIME
        //CODE
        //CODE AGAIN
        //ANOTHER CODE
        //CODE NA NAMAN
        //CODE PA RIN!





        //Connect to Database to generate auto number
        NpgsqlConnection iConnect = new NpgsqlConnection("Server=localhost;Port=5432;User ID=postgres;Password=pass;Database=DB");
        iConnect.Open();
        NpgsqlCommand iQuery = new NpgsqlCommand("Select * from table1", iConnect);
        NpgsqlDataReader iRead = iQuery.ExecuteReader();
        NpgsqlDataAdapter iAdapter = new NpgsqlDataAdapter(iQuery);

        DataSet iDataSet = new DataSet();
        iAdapter.Fill(iDataSet, "ID");

        MessageBox.Show(iDataSet.Tables["ID"].Rows.Count.ToString());
        }

NOW:

    public Form1()
        {
        //Connect to Database to generate auto number
        NpgsqlConnection iConnect = new NpgsqlConnection("Server=localhost;Port=5432;User ID=postgres;Password=pass;Database=DB");
        iConnect.Open();
        NpgsqlCommand iQuery = new NpgsqlCommand("Select * from table1", iConnect);
        NpgsqlDataReader iRead = iQuery.ExecuteReader();
        NpgsqlDataAdapter iAdapter = new NpgsqlDataAdapter(iQuery);

        DataSet iDataSet = new DataSet();
        iAdapter.Fill(iDataSet, "ID");

        MessageBox.Show(iDataSet.Tables["ID"].Rows.Count.ToString());





        //HERE LIES SOME CODES FOR RESIZING MY CONTROLS DURING RUNTIME
        //CODE
        //CODE AGAIN
        //ANOTHER CODE
        //CODE NA NAMAN
        //CODE PA RIN!

        }

I think that the program must read first the connection before doing anything, I don't know, correct me if I'm wrong. But according to my research, it's not a code problem - it was actually from the machine itself.

Happy Coding!

2

This solved my problem. I added this line before the request is made:

System.Net.ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false;

It seemed there were a proxy in the way of the server that not supported 100-continue behavior.

1
System.Net.ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false;

This issue sometime occurs due the reason of proxy server implemented on web server. To bypass the proxy server by putting this line before calling the send service.

0

I had a Third Party application (Fiddler) running to try and see the requests being sent. Closing this application fixed it for me

0

We had a very similar issue whereby a client's website was trying to connect to our Web API service and getting that same message. This started happening completely out of the blue when there had been no code changes or Windows updates on the server where IIS was running.

In our case it turned out that the calling website was using a version of .Net that only supported TLS 1.0 and for some reason the server where our IIS was running stopped appeared to have stopped accepting TLS 1.0 calls. To diagnose that we had to explicitly enable TLS via the registry on the IIS's server and then restart that server. These are the reg keys:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.0\Client] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.0\Server] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.1\Client] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.1\Server] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.2\Client] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\TLS
    1.2\Server] "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000 "Enabled"=dword:00000001

If that doesn't do it, you could also experiment with adding the entry for SSL 2.0:


    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Client]
    "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000
    "Enabled"=dword:00000001

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Server]
    "DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000
    "Enabled"=dword:00000001

My answer to another question here has this powershell script that we used to add the entries:

NOTE: Enabling old security protocols is not a good idea, the right answer in our case was to get the client website to update it's code to use TLS 1.2, but the registry entries above can help diagnose the issue in the first place.

0

The reason this was happening to me was I had a recursive dependency in my DI provider. In my case I had:

services.AddScoped(provider => new CfDbContext(builder.Options));
services.AddScoped(provider => provider.GetService<CfDbContext>());

Fix was to just remove the second scoped service registration

services.AddScoped(provider => new CfDbContext(builder.Options));
0

If you have a https certificate on the domain, make sure you have the https binding to the domain name in IIS. In IIS -> Select your domain -> Click on Bindings Site Bindings Window opens up. Add a binding for https.

0

Had a similar problem and was getting the following errors depending on what app I used and if we bypassed the firewall / load balancer or not:

HTTPS handshake to [blah] (for #136) failed. System.IO.IOException Unable to read data from the transport connection: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host

and

ReadResponse() failed: The server did not return a complete response for this request. Server returned 0 bytes.

The problem turned out to be that the SSL Server Certificate got missed and wasn't installed on a couple servers.

0

Try checking if you can establish handshake in the first place. I had this issue before when uploading a file and I only figured out that the issue was the nonexistent route when I removed the upload and checked if it can login given the parameters.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.