1

Here is my problem :

I would like to organize N positive integers into an AxB matrix, so that the difference between neighbor cells is minimized. N is greater than AxB so I have a lot of possible choices.

For example, if I have the numbers 1,3,4,9,21 to position in a 2x2 matrix,

I can build this matrix :

5 4
1 9

we can calculate the sum of the difference between neighbor cells : (5-4) + (5-1) + (9-4) + (9-1) = 1+4+5+8 = 18

but if I rearrange the numbers this way :

1 4
5 9

the sum is now (5-1)+(4-1)+(9-5)+(9-4) = 4+3+4+5 = 16 which is better.

I though of using brute force, by switching each number and calculating the sum each time, but my actual problem has a 4*5 matrix and 41 numbers to choose from so the number of possible matrices is 41!/20! (654 764 331 820 982 885 260 361 465 856).

Does anyone have an idea of how to address the problem differently ?

  • Some thoughts: Intuition suggests that you should throw away outlier values until you are down to as many as you have slots. So (as you are doing) initially eliminate 21 because it's further away from 9 than 1 is from 3. Then, since differences between diagonal neighbors are not counted towards the result, you should probably arrange numbers by greatest difference along diagonal lines (as indeed you do in the exampe). – 500 - Internal Server Error Jan 16 at 12:05
  • @user7285170 can we have the list of 41 numbers to choose from of your problem? – user10472446 Jan 17 at 1:27
3

This is actually an easier problem. Hit it with your grade-school algebra. First, a little insight will show that you always want the numbers sorted for going from top-left to bottom right. Either ascending or descending will do; they're isomorphic. Let's assume ascending, to match your examples. For a set of 9 numbers:

i1 i2 i3
i4 i5 i6
i7 i8 i9

We need to sum the terms

// ROWS
i2-i1 + i3-i2 +
i5-i4 + i6-i5 +
i8-i7 + i9-i8 +
// COLUMNS
i4-i1 + i7-i4 +
i5-i2 + i8-i5 +
i6-i3 + i9-i6

This reduces to i3-i1 + i6-i4 + i9-i7 + i7-i1 + i8-i2 + i9-i3

And that becomes 2*i9 - 2*i1 + i6+i8 - (i2+i4)

Start by sorting your N numbers and finding the contiguous subsequence of A*B numbers with the smallest difference between lowest and highest. Then arrange the non-corner border numbers so that the (upper+left) - (lower+right) difference is minimized, noting how many numbers can go in between each pair. Finally, fill in the middle in any legal way.

Very simply, this reduces to the sums of the top and left edges, minus the bottom and right edges. Main corners count double; upper-right and lower-left corners, and all the internal terms, drop out.

Yes, I've left out a few logic steps ... I'm hoping this is enough of a hint for you. It reduces the search space from A*B numbers taken from N to two contiguous sequences of A+B-2 numbers in that sequence of A*B.

  • 1
    The differences are actually | i2 - i1 |. The modulus prevents the (otherwise nice) reduction. – user58697 Jan 16 at 18:09
  • @user58697 As I mentioned in the first paragraph, a little insight shows that the optimum answer will have the values sorted, so that all of the differences will be in the same direction. – Prune Jan 16 at 18:11
  • Thanks, it is indeed more simple than I believed at first ! I will try your solution. – Pierre Girardeau Jan 16 at 21:08
  • @Prune: can't the solution simply be reduced to the list of successive increasing element that has the smallest difference between the first and last element since by the equations the following needs to exist: i9>i8>i2 and i9>i6>i4? Then the elements simply need to be ordered like SaiBot example, don't they? – user10472446 Jan 17 at 0:56
  • @user10472446 Nope. That was my first impression, but I quickly realized that's not the case. Other comments have already shown the arithmetic on a 4x4 (results 68, 67, and 60). Most of all, see the algebraic result in my answer above: the edge terms do not drop out of the equation. You need to minimize the difference between the top and left edges, versus the bottom and right edges. – Prune Jan 17 at 16:47
1

To come back on @Prune solution and the different comments it is important to understand the resulting equation.

Because the numbers are ordered on each line and each column the global equation with abs() is simplified to for all lines and columns sum(last-first).

The resulting equation contains six groups which are summed 2*RB - 2*TL + RE + BE - LE - TE where:

  • twice the top-left corner element as negative: TL
  • twice the right-bottom corner element as positive: RB
  • the sum of all elements on the most right column except the corners: RE
  • the sum of all elements on the bottom line except the corners: BE
  • the sum of all elements on the most left column except the corners: LE
  • the sum of all elements on the top line except the corners: TE

The idea is to minimize the RE + BE - LE - TE edge element for the chosen RB and TL elements.

If we apply this formula to the matrix below the result for the edge element is 8+12+14+15-2-3-5-9 = 49-19 = 30

 1  2  3  4
 5  6  7  8
 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16

If we apply this formula to the matrix below the result for the edge element is 11+14+13+15-2-4-3-6 = 53-15 = 38 which is not minimal.

 1  2  4  7
 3  5  8 11
 6  9 12 14
10 13 15 16

So to that respect the minimization of the edge component seems to be a good approach. The problem is how to minimize this element while complying with the rules of > along the lines and columns. However it is probable that filling the matrix from left to right and top to bottom with the numbers in order will give good enough results.

Regarding your problem of a matrix 4*5 with 41 values available, it would be interesting to compare the 22 matrices you can obtain after sorting those 41 numbers, filling them linearly and see if the matrices with the smallest gap between extreme elements (I just realized that you could have several matrices having the same distance between first and last element but with different total distances) is really the ones with minimal "distance" as defined by the abs() formula.

Let us know.

Addendum

Here are a few examples, for a 4x5 (rows x cols) matrix. I would be interested to see the results with others methods to see how far the method is to ideal!

Elements = [3, 6, 59, 75, 76, 120, 132, 140, 226, 233, 237, 296, 349, 351, 351, 381, 422, 468, 478, 499, 523, 540, 570, 588, 597, 629, 687, 707, 714, 740, 742, 746, 755, 781, 812, 845, 897, 902, 927, 982, 999]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [2447, 2459, 2420, 2464, 2510, 2386, 2336, 2357, 2318, 2319, 2310, 2192, 2096, 2093, 2038, 1961, 1893, 1952, 2000, 2025, 2127, 2128]
List of indexes where min values are = [16]
Minimum value found = 1893
Matrix found = [422, 468, 478, 499, 523, 540, 570, 588, 597, 629, 687, 707, 714, 740, 742, 746, 755, 781, 812, 845]

Elements = [37, 45, 55, 78, 87, 110, 142, 157, 287, 294, 302, 309, 313, 333, 356, 379, 380, 406, 422, 456, 461, 466, 467, 475, 506, 551, 556, 575, 578, 610, 689, 717, 748, 757, 773, 935, 944, 954, 956, 994, 998]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [2106, 2126, 2105, 1921, 1866, 1745, 1679, 1574, 1402, 1411, 1492, 1687, 1766, 1876, 1882, 1906, 2322, 2433, 2603, 2658, 2655, 2871]
List of indexes where min values are = [8]
Minimum value found = 1402
Matrix found = [287, 294, 302, 309, 313, 333, 356, 379, 380, 406, 422, 456, 461, 466, 467, 475, 506, 551, 556, 575]

Elements = [25, 26, 28, 78, 80, 92, 93, 100, 115, 149, 170, 209, 222, 252, 269, 333, 344, 366, 371, 371, 384, 412, 437, 446, 469, 498, 547, 553, 557, 563, 597, 626, 642, 730, 756, 771, 771, 793, 798, 856, 937]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1797, 1839, 1875, 1841, 1885, 1878, 1962, 2041, 2042, 1990, 1883, 1832, 1827, 1793, 1907, 1913, 2010, 2124, 2167, 2211, 2235, 2340]
List of indexes where min values are = [13]
Minimum value found = 1793
Matrix found = [252, 269, 333, 344, 366, 371, 371, 384, 412, 437, 446, 469, 498, 547, 553, 557, 563, 597, 626, 642]

Elements = [19, 82, 97, 108, 123, 162, 178, 207, 224, 243, 264, 290, 307, 333, 350, 364, 393, 419, 428, 459, 514, 582, 646, 679, 696, 698, 758, 761, 786, 815, 833, 853, 875, 875, 894, 902, 905, 923, 959, 961, 962]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [2000, 2002, 2147, 2337, 2475, 2547, 2582, 2693, 2733, 2740, 2754, 2695, 2754, 2778, 2745, 2722, 2547, 2446, 2307, 2138, 1952, 1706]
List of indexes where min values are = [21]
Minimum value found = 1706
Matrix found = [582, 646, 679, 696, 698, 758, 761, 786, 815, 833, 853, 875, 875, 894, 902, 905, 923, 959, 961, 962]

Elements = [190, 220, 240, 249, 259, 264, 349, 353, 365, 380, 392, 399, 410, 427, 437, 491, 501, 522, 564, 578, 621, 627, 639, 643, 657, 662, 668, 684, 712, 713, 714, 733, 782, 804, 840, 881, 909, 910, 911, 944, 990]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1815, 1853, 1902, 1874, 1863, 1760, 1679, 1651, 1624, 1669, 1593, 1620, 1564, 1557, 1569, 1517, 1603, 1614, 1607, 1625, 1644, 1746]
List of indexes where min values are = [15]
Minimum value found = 1517
Matrix found = [491, 501, 522, 564, 578, 621, 627, 639, 643, 657, 662, 668, 684, 712, 713, 714, 733, 782, 804, 840]

Elements = [50, 64, 82, 114, 142, 173, 181, 183, 228, 237, 279, 340, 340, 356, 359, 379, 400, 415, 425, 427, 453, 532, 547, 587, 606, 619, 650, 671, 687, 707, 718, 739, 765, 803, 832, 837, 853, 861, 917, 923, 954]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1878, 1844, 1993, 1953, 2070, 2068, 2060, 2179, 2086, 2107, 2029, 1906, 2036, 2050, 2157, 2214, 2162, 2214, 2144, 2176, 2107, 1971]
List of indexes where min values are = [1]
Minimum value found = 1844
Matrix found = [64, 82, 114, 142, 173, 181, 183, 228, 237, 279, 340, 340, 356, 359, 379, 400, 415, 425, 427, 453]

Elements = [48, 49, 75, 107, 108, 126, 132, 142, 142, 167, 170, 216, 220, 222, 246, 250, 253, 269, 374, 425, 464, 469, 484, 505, 539, 540, 602, 620, 641, 677, 719, 748, 751, 777, 817, 830, 893, 904, 932, 952, 997]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1536, 1680, 1817, 1871, 1994, 2119, 2138, 2258, 2241, 2312, 2469, 2538, 2693, 2678, 2690, 2726, 2619, 2655, 2467, 2426, 2482, 2515]
List of indexes where min values are = [0]
Minimum value found = 1536
Matrix found = [48, 49, 75, 107, 108, 126, 132, 142, 142, 167, 170, 216, 220, 222, 246, 250, 253, 269, 374, 425]

Elements = [7, 39, 46, 62, 66, 85, 127, 151, 191, 205, 220, 221, 228, 234, 240, 303, 324, 329, 338, 352, 364, 366, 408, 408, 498, 559, 624, 624, 640, 654, 655, 740, 742, 757, 825, 862, 879, 908, 950, 956, 977]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1674, 1670, 1647, 1628, 1586, 1608, 1753, 1928, 2066, 2162, 2256, 2317, 2449, 2484, 2413, 2521, 2605, 2822, 2942, 2952, 3004, 2875]
List of indexes where min values are = [4]
Minimum value found = 1586
Matrix found = [66, 85, 127, 151, 191, 205, 220, 221, 228, 234, 240, 303, 324, 329, 338, 352, 364, 366, 408, 408]

Elements = [17, 161, 185, 192, 211, 231, 291, 307, 319, 346, 348, 369, 391, 415, 447, 449, 473, 477, 491, 498, 518, 525, 529, 545, 589, 625, 632, 639, 645, 655, 680, 770, 795, 798, 802, 812, 836, 889, 892, 931, 931]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [2079, 1729, 1697, 1616, 1524, 1546, 1484, 1526, 1523, 1477, 1475, 1453, 1578, 1628, 1651, 1729, 1755, 1857, 1949, 1952, 1996, 1951]
List of indexes where min values are = [11]
Minimum value found = 1453
Matrix found = [369, 391, 415, 447, 449, 473, 477, 491, 498, 518, 525, 529, 545, 589, 625, 632, 639, 645, 655, 680]

Elements = [10, 23, 29, 50, 61, 71, 72, 82, 137, 147, 249, 262, 267, 295, 303, 340, 346, 366, 369, 415, 489, 500, 582, 659, 662, 667, 683, 705, 716, 731, 734, 776, 785, 803, 819, 841, 877, 883, 949, 951, 995]
Distances for the 22 possible matrices = [1919, 2197, 2292, 2465, 2756, 2761, 2948, 2870, 2774, 2725, 2492, 2541, 2496, 2491, 2541, 2478, 2465, 2384, 2276, 2224, 2041, 1986]
List of indexes where min values are = [0]
Minimum value found = 1919
Matrix found = [10, 23, 29, 50, 61, 71, 72, 82, 137, 147, 249, 262, 267, 295, 303, 340, 346, 366, 369, 415]
1

Don't know if just sorting is optimal. But it certainly is a good starting point. With a random data set I see:

enter image description here

The second solution was found with a Mixed Integer Programming model. It was proven optimal (but I added the constraint that values are increasing row- and column-wise).

  • If the constraint that values are increasing row- and column-wise is removed, what matrix do you obtain then? – user10472446 Jan 19 at 10:09
  • @user10472446 That turns out to be a difficult problem. I let it run for a few hours but was not able to improve that solution (but the gap was still significant: more than 10%). With the extra constraints it is an easy problem to solve. I suspect they don't cut off the optimal solution. – Erwin Kalvelagen Jan 21 at 17:56
  • What software did you use? Where can we find it? – user10472446 Jan 22 at 13:27
  • I used GAMS+Cplex. – Erwin Kalvelagen Jan 22 at 15:28
0

Would just filling the matrix in a smart way not be a good start?

lets say you have the following numbers: 1 2 4 6 7 8 9 13 17 Can you not fill the matrix in the following way: Starting with lowest number in a corner fill the matrix as follows:

i1 i2 i4
i3 i5 i7
i6 i8 i9

Which would result in the following:

1   2   6
4   7   9
8   13  17

From this start result you could just try to swap random positions and see if the sum of each numbers neighbors get's lower. If the result gets lower, repeat this otherwise try a different swap.

I don't know if this runs into local minimum quit fast, you could also chose to do multiple swaps before evaluating if the result gets lower.

EDIT: I now see that you more numbers then that actually fit the matrix. I assume that these are all unique. So choosing a sub set which has lowest average difference will probably also result in a matrix which has lowest neighbor sum.

Good luck

  • I think you could do better using a space-filling curve with better locality property , e.g. a Hilbert curve – SaiBot Jan 16 at 13:44
  • 1
    nvm, trying with numbers 1-16 I got 68 using your approach, 67 using a hilbert curve and 60 by filling the numbers from left to right row by row. – SaiBot Jan 16 at 14:14
  • @SaiBot what is the matrix giving out a result of 60? – user10472446 Jan 16 at 14:57
  • @user10472446 4x4 if I did not make any mistakes, so [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8],[9, 10, 11, 12], [13, 14, 15, 16]]. Each row has sum of differences of 3 and each column has sum of difference of 12 which makes 4*3+ 4*12 = 60. – SaiBot Jan 16 at 15:34
  • @SaiBot: You nailed a degenerate case of the answer I have in mind. I'm sure the OP would appreciate any additional insights you might have; balance with leaving something for OP to solve. – Prune Jan 16 at 18:13

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