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I'm doing an assignment for school, but I'm having trouble with wrapper conversions, I guess. I need to return the result from the addition of variables a and b, in a long method with the header like this:

public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    …your code here…
} 

Honestly I've been trying different things for at least a couple hours at this point.. I've looked online and I'm still very lost. I think I either might not understand the question or maybe I'm trying to do it the wrong way.

public class Wrapper {

public Integer x;
public Integer y;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Wrapper aWrapper = new Wrapper();
    aWrapper.addIntegers(2, 5);


}

public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    Integer sum = a + b;

    return sum;
}

}

I expected this to work since I thought that creating and Integer variable would be able to add two int variables, but I was wrong. I've tried many other ways and the most common error is that I can't convert "x" to Long. In the case above, the error said that it couldn't convert from Integer to Long.

  • how do you expect that to work? you set Long as returntype, and you return an Integer. – Stultuske Jan 16 at 18:00
-1

Try this Example

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Main main = new Main();
        System.out.println(main.addInteger(5, 5));
    }

    public Long addInteger(Integer a, Integer b) {
        Integer sum = a + b;
        return sum.longValue();
    }
}
  • This is incorrect. When you add 2 ints the maximum possible value cannot be held by an int so you'll get wraparound.To test this try: addInteger(Integer.MAX_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE), expected result is 4294967294, this method produces -2. You need to cast a+b to a long. See my answer. – donturner Jan 17 at 11:30
  • @donturner Your absolutely right. addInteger(Integer.MAX_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE), produces is -2 answers. – Ng Sharma Jan 17 at 13:04
  • @tiescut you can used this two approaches public Long addInteger(Integer a, Integer b) { (1) return (long)a + b; (2) return a.longValue() + b.longValue(); } – Ng Sharma Jan 17 at 13:10
1
public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    Integer sum = a + b;

    return sum;
}

You're almost right with this. I can see why you'd think it would work, but you can't go from Integer -> Long either implicitly or via casting. You'd need to go Integer -> int -> long -> Long, and Java can only make 1 jump implicitly.

First let's take a look at what a + b is actually doing. It's unboxing both of a and b from Integers to primitive ints and adding the two together, resulting in an int. It's then automatically boxing that to an Integer because that's the type of the variable sum you've defined.

But hang on, we can see above (Integer -> int -> long -> Long) that Integer is actually further from where we want to be, not closer!

So let's go back to a + b, which returns an int. We want a Long. We could cast the result to long:

public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    return (long) (a + b);
}

In such a case, we have an int - the result of our sum expression - and we explicitly cast to a long, and Java takes the final implicit step and autoboxes this to a Long.

However, while casting is fine in our case, it is often a sign of bad design so I try to avoid using it where possible. Luckily, in our case we can avoid the cast. We just have to switch the implicit step and explicit steps (i.e. implicitly convert from int -> long and explicitly convert from long -> Long)

public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    return Long.valueOf(a + b);
}

In this example, Long.valueOf takes a primitive long and returns a Long but our a + b calculation returns an int, so Java implicitly casts the int to a long.

0

You need to cast the sum to long as :

  1. (int + int) = int cast to long

    public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
        return (long) (a + b);
    }
    
  2. (int cast to long) + int = long

    public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
        return (long) a + b;
    }
    

Also :

  • it seems you don't need attributs
  • you need a local variable to save the result of the sum
class Wrapper {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Wrapper aWrapper = new Wrapper();
        Long res = aWrapper.addIntegers(2, 5);
    }

    public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
        return (long) a + b;
    }
}
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Here's the simplest method:

public Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    return (long)a+b; 
}

What's going on?

a and b are implicitly converted to ints in a+b. Because the result of a+b might be larger than the maximum value of an int (int=32bits, long=64bits) we must explicitly cast the result to a long. When we return a long it is implicitly converted to a Long because of the method return type.

  • @azro no, he changed the type of sum – Stultuske Jan 16 at 18:02
  • Did you try it? This does not compile. Java can't go int -> long -> Long. It can only ever make 1 jump implicitly. – Michael Jan 16 at 18:03
  • Wow, that's embarrassing. Thanks for spotting this - fixed. – donturner Jan 17 at 11:25
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Since a and b are of Integer type, hence you can call longValue method to retrieve them as long and sum them and return the value which will be a long without needing any explicit cast.

public static Long addIntegers(Integer a, Integer b) {
    return a.longValue() + b.longValue();
}

Note, since we are adding two long values, we are also ensuring it won't run into any risk for integer overflow as addition of two large integers can possibly run into it.

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