0

Trying to solve simple exercise: find common part of two lists without repetitions using list comprehension. Found the solution online but don't understand the last bit. It's a compound filter, but I don't get how "not c.append(elem)" resolves to a boolean.

from random import randrange

a = []
b = []
c = []

for x in range(randrange(15, 20)):
    a.append(randrange(1, 20))
    b.append(randrange(1, 20))

a.sort()

print(a)
print(b)

c = [elem for elem in a if elem in b and elem not in c and not c.append(elem)]
print(c)

It's only about "and not c.append(elem)".

  • This is a less beautiful way to put a side effect into a comprehension. It is OK not to memorize this for further programming. – Klaus D. Jan 17 at 3:42
1

Take this apart:

... elem not in c and not c.append(elem)

This part first checks if elem is in c (Note: The previous c declared before as c = []), and if it's not, append it to c. Since list.append always returns None, which is a falsey value. The not before it inverts the result into True, so the element is also picked up by the list comprehension.

The code effectively filters out unique common elements in a and b and is equivalent to the following code:

list_comp_result = []
for elem in a:
    if elem in b:
        if elem not in c:
            c.append(elem)  # <-- always None
            list_comp_result.append(elem)
0

it is only used to append elem

c.append(elem) = None

not c.append(elem) always True

  • in this case。you can use:d= list(set(a) & set(b)) – notback Jan 17 at 3:50
  • + if not use and not c.append(elem) in processing , c = [] until [...] finish , c = [...]'s result 。 + if use and not c.append(elem)] then in processing , c is changed code1 = ``` c=[elem for elem in a if elem in b and elem not in c and not c.append(elem)] print(c) ``` code2= ``` [elem for elem in a if elem in b and elem not in c and not c.append(elem)] print(c) ``` code3= ``` for elem in a: if elem in b: if elem not in c: c.append(elem) print(c) ``` code1 = code2 =code3 – notback Jan 17 at 10:39

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.