6

Recently I often see code like the following (this example is taken from Symfony):

protected function execute(InputInterface $input, OutputInterface $output)
{
    throw new LogicException('You must override the execute() method in the concrete command class.');
}

What is the benefit here over just marking the method as abstract?

What's the benefit for the ...

  1. ... library author?
  2. ... library user?

I already found a similar question for Java (Faking abstract methods using exceptions in Java), but it wasn't very helpful as its answers are explicit guessings and opinions.

1

In this particular case, the comments explain:

/**
 * Executes the current command.
 *
 * This method is not abstract because you can use this class
 * as a concrete class. In this case, instead of defining the
 * execute() method, you set the code to execute by passing
 * a Closure to the setCode() method.
 *
 * @return int|null null or 0 if everything went fine, or an error code
 *
 * @throws LogicException When this abstract method is not implemented
 *
 * @see setCode()
 */
protected function execute(InputInterface $input, OutputInterface $output)
{
    throw new LogicException('You must override the execute() method in the concrete command class.');
}

You could argue with the overall design as it is perhaps a bit hacky but it works well in practice. Take a look at Command::run to see where the decision to use a closure or execute is made. Bit of a niche case to say the least.

I know quite a bit of this was discussed in the comments of the other answer but I thought it might help to summarize. I also did a quick search through the Symfony framework code looking to see where the closure approach was used. Did not find anything. The closure support goes all the way back to the original 2.0 release so it might have one of those "seemed a good idea at the time" bits of functionality.

1

A possible use case is optional methods. If you make it abstract then all child classes need to implement it:

abstract class Database
{
    abstract public function export();
}

class MySQL extends Database
{
}

Fatal error: Class MySQL contains 1 abstract method and must therefore be declared abstract or implement the remaining methods (Database::export)

If you make a regular method then child classes only need to implement the method if they plan to support it.

abstract class Database
{
    public function export(){
        throw new \LogicException(__CLASS__ . ' driver does not support ' . __FUNCTION__);
    }
}

class MySQL extends Database
{
}

... yet you get a nice error if you attempt to use it:

$s = new MySQL();
$s->export();

Fatal error: Uncaught exception 'LogicException': MySQL driver does not support export

  • But isn't this a reason to use Interfaces? – Foobar Jan 23 at 6:29
  • @Foobar Fatal error: Interface function Database::export() cannot contain body. Not sure if I'm missing something. – Álvaro González Jan 23 at 7:07
  • I meant, if you don't want "to be exportable" just don't implement the interface Exportable. So that the "unsupported" method is not there in the first place. class MySQL extends Database implements Exportable to support exporting, and without implements Exportable when it does not. – Foobar Jan 23 at 7:30
  • That technique is fine but it doesn't scale because a class can only implement zero or one interfaces. I guess you can create traits instead. However there're tons of pre-PHP/5.4 code out there, what often explains many strange workarounds. – Álvaro González Jan 23 at 7:56
  • A class can implement as much interfaces as it wants (ok, technically I assume there's some boundings by how much billions an integer can hold on the arhcitecture). It can only inherit from one class (extend can only be used once per class, but implements can hold as much as it wants). And the PHP 5.4 argument doesn't really hold, because I just started seeing this "pseudo-abstract" pattern in the younger times. – Foobar Jan 23 at 11:49
0

only abstract classes can have abstract methods.

You can't create object from abstract classes.

All abstract methods must be implemented in non-abstract classes.

Constructed Example:

Imagine the following:

abstract class Repository {
    public abstract function read();
    public abstract function write($object);
    public abstract function delete($object);
    public function connection() {
        //this is implemented for you by the framework so you don't have to do it every time
    }

Now you want to implement a repository for logging user-actions (logged-in, logged-out, ...)

You don't want any of those entries to be deleted and that's when you don't want to implement the delete function. But you have to, because your UserActionRepository is not abstract, because you actually need instances of it. that's when you throw an exception.

  • Why should I instantiate a class that lacks implementation? That's like if it'd be possible to instantiate an interface. – Foobar Jan 17 at 7:45
  • When you don't need an implementation because you can be sure you don't need the method. I'll try to come up with a usefull/real-world example – Philipp Sander Jan 17 at 7:50
  • @Foobar updated. – Philipp Sander Jan 17 at 7:58
  • Thanks, I'd really like to see a convincing example. Because to the example-less argument I'd reply "if you don't need a method, don't declare it". Or "if you don't want the class to be extended mark it final". Or "if you must be extended and must have an implemented method mark it abstract". The situation "class can optionally be extended, but if it's extended it must implement a method" smells like bad architecture because the base class obviosuly does not need this method then -- then why it's in the base class the first place? – Foobar Jan 17 at 7:59
  • Then just keep the delete method empty in the derived class. In good architecture abstract methods are already called in the base(!) class. What you explain is a use case for interfaces (DeletableInterface, WritableInterface, etc.) – Foobar Jan 17 at 8:02

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