4

There is an Integer property called foo in a model. Now I need to know whether it equals 1 or 2. Usually I use:

if (null != model) {
    Integer foo = model.getFoo();
    if (foo != null) {
        if (foo == 1) {
            // do something...
        }
        if (foo == 2) {
            // do something...
        }
    }
}

Is there any handier code to avoid the NullPointerException?

  • 2
    Integer.valueOf(1).equals(foo), Integer.valueOf(2).equals(foo) – Michael Jan 17 at 8:55
  • (Integer)model.getFoo().compareTo(1) , (Integer)model.getFoo().compareTo(2) – Shivendra Gupta Jan 17 at 8:56
  • @ShivendraGupta what if model.getFoo() is null? – Henry Jan 17 at 8:58
  • @ShivendraGupta That will still NPE. – Thilo Jan 17 at 8:58
  • @ShivendraGupta that would still throw NullPointerException if foo is null, and is essentially the same as foo == 1, foo == 2. – Jesper Jan 17 at 8:58
6

You can use Optional:

Optional.ofNullable(model)
        .map(Model::getFoo)
        .ifPresent(foo -> {
            switch (foo) { // or if-else-if, the important thing is you skip the null check
                case 1: 
                    ...
                    break;
                case 2:
                    ...
                    break;
                ...
            }

        });
  • Note that this eliminates both null checks, not just the one OP did not like. – Thilo Jan 17 at 9:02
  • @Thilo isn't skipping both null checks better than skipping just one? I guess it depends on the actual use case. – Eran Jan 17 at 9:04
  • 1
    Yes, this was meant as praise. You overachieved! – Thilo Jan 17 at 9:04
2

You can use the null-safe java.util.Object.equals:

if(null != model) {
   Integer foo = model.getFoo();

   if(Objects.equals(foo, 1){
       //do something
   }
   if(Objects.equals(foo, 2){
       //do something
   }
}

The method has this description:

Returns true if the arguments are equal to each other and false otherwise. Consequently, if both arguments are null, true is returned and if exactly one argument is null, false is returned. Otherwise, equality is determined by using the equals method of the first argument.

  • 1
    Why is no one using else-if ? – Thilo Jan 17 at 9:00
  • lol .....@Thilo – Shivendra Gupta Jan 17 at 9:01
  • @Thilo I shouldn't assume it's an oversight in the original code, thought it's doing different things in those blocks – ernest_k Jan 17 at 9:01
1

If you didn't return null sentinels values, and instead used Optionals, you could do:

Optional<Model> model = getModel();
Optional<Integer> foo = model.flatMap(Model::getFoo);
foo.filter(Integer.valueOf(1)::equals).ifPresent(this::doSomething);
foo.filter(Integer.valueOf(2)::equals).ifPresent(this::doSomethingElse);
1

You could do Integer.of(1).equals(foo), but this is a bit silly. Why save the one line? I'd just put it inside the same if/else-if chain (and if that gets long, conside a switch/case (which also is not null-safe, though).

if (foo == null)
else if (foo == 1)
else if (foo == 2)

Also note that comparing objects with == is a bit tricky because of how auto-boxing works (or does not work). I think that it works in this case, but I do not want to have to think about it too hard, so in my code I usually drop down to int (after the null check) to be on the safe side.

1

Assuming possible value is only 1 or 2 Of course the model the should be guarded with null check Use ternary operator

Model theModel = model.getFoo() ;

if(model!=null && model.getFoo()!=null){
   model.getFoo() == 1 ? callOne() : call2();
}
  • @Thilo I assumed the null check will be retained. – Prashant Zombade Jan 17 at 9:10
  • Updated the answer with null checks. – Prashant Zombade Jan 17 at 9:15
1

Edit the code to like this:

 if (null != model) {
        Integer foo = model.getFoo();
            if (Integer.valueOf(1).equals(foo)) {
                // do something...
            }
            if (Integer.valueOf(2).equals(foo)) {
                // do something...
            }

}

I hope to help you.

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