9

I need merge maps mapA andmapB with pairs of "name" - "phone number" into the final map, sticking together the values for duplicate keys, separated by commas. Duplicate values should be added only once. I need the most idiomatic and correct in terms of language approach.

For example:

val mapA = mapOf("Emergency" to "112", "Fire department" to "101", "Police" to "102")
val mapB = mapOf("Emergency" to "911", "Police" to "102")

The final result should look like this:

{"Emergency" to "112, 911", "Fire department" to "101", "Police" to "102"}

This is my function:

fun mergePhoneBooks(mapA: Map<String, String>, mapB: Map<String, String>): Map<String, String> {
    val unionList: MutableMap <String, String> = mapA.toMutableMap()
    unionList.forEach { (key, value) -> TODO() } // here's I can't come on with a beatiful solution

    return unionList
}
8

How about:

val unionList = (mapA.asSequence() + mapB.asSequence())
    .distinct()
    .groupBy({ it.key }, { it.value })
    .mapValues { (_, values) -> values.joinToString(",") }

Result:

{Emergency=112,911, Fire department=101, Police=102}

This will:

  • produce a lazy Sequence of both maps' key-value pairs
  • group them by key (result: Map<String, List<String>)
  • map their values to comma-joined strings (result: Map<String, String>)
  • Your example will print: {Emergency=112,911, Fire department=101, Police=102,102}, I guess it should be without repeating: Police=102,102 – Sergey Jan 17 at 9:50
  • Yes, you are right, my bad, didn't notice. – Sergey Jan 17 at 11:39
  • 2
    Be careful, this solution will fail to merge maps if they have same key and value, merging {A=1, B=2} and {A=5, B=2} will result into {A=6, B=2} – Anton Kushch Jun 4 at 9:47
  • @AntonKushch well, yes, that is why I added distinct due to the OP's use case. You could remove it if you want to handle duplicates. – Moira Jun 4 at 11:03
  • @Moira just to raise attention of blind copy/pasters :D – Anton Kushch Jun 4 at 11:46
2

I would write something like

fun Map<String, String>.mergeWith(another: Map<String, String>): Map<String, String> {
  val unionList: MutableMap<String, String> = toMutableMap()
  for ((key, value) in another) {
    unionList[key] = listOfNotNull(unionList[key], value).toSet().joinToString(", ")
  }
  return unionList
}

val mergedMap = mapA.mergeWith(mapB)
2
    val mapA = mapOf("Emergency" to "112", "Fire department" to "101", "Police" to "102")
    val mapB = mapOf("Emergency" to "911", "Police" to "102")

    val result = (mapA.entries + mapB.entries)
        .groupBy({ it.key }, { it.value })
        .mapValues {(_, value) -> 
            value.joinToString(", ")
        }
  • Your result is List<Pair<String, String>, but it should be Map<String, String>. – Sergey Jan 17 at 9:55
2

You can do the following:

(mapA.keys + mapB.keys).associateWith {
    setOf(mapA[it], mapB[it]).filterNotNull().joinToString()
}
  1. put all keys in a set
  2. iterate over that set and and associate each element with the set of values
  3. remove the null values from the value set
  4. concatenate the elements in the value list using joinToString().
  • damn... that associateWith was what I was looking for, but couldn't remember :-) – Roland Jan 17 at 23:46
  • @Roland i know that feeling :D – Willi Mentzel Jan 18 at 7:31
2

In Kotlin you could do this:

fun main() {
    val map1 = mapOf("A" to 1, "B" to 2)
    val map2 = mapOf("A" to 5, "B" to 2)
    val result: Map<String, Int> = listOf(map1, map2)
        .fold(mapOf()) { accMap, map ->
            accMap.merge(map, Int::plus)
        }
    println(result) // Prints: {A=6, B=4}
}

private fun <T, V> Map<T, V>.merge(another: Map<T, V>, mergeFunction: (V, V) -> V): Map<T, V> =
    toMutableMap()
        .apply {
            another.forEach { (key, value) ->
                merge(key, value, mergeFunction)
            }
        }
1

Another approach:

val mapA = mapOf("Emergency" to "112", "Fire department" to "101", "Police" to "102")
val mapB = mapOf("Emergency" to "911", "Police" to "102")

val result = mapA.toMutableMap()
mapB.forEach {
    var value = result[it.key]
    value = if (value == null || value == it.value) it.value else value + ", ${it.value}"
    result[it.key] = value
}

Or using infix extension function:

infix fun Map<String, String>.mergeWith(anotherMap: Map<String, String>): Map<String, String> {
    val result = this.toMutableMap()
    anotherMap.forEach {
        var value = result[it.key]
        value = if (value == null || value == it.value) it.value else value + ", ${it.value}"
        result[it.key] = value
    }
    return result
}

val result = mapA mergeWith mapB
1

While I looked at the other solutions I couldn't believe that there isn't an easier way (or ways as easy as the accepted answer without the need to recreate a Map, intermediate new lists, etc.). Here are 3 (of many ;-)) solutions I came up with:

  1. Using the keys and mapping the values later:

    (mapA.keys.asSequence() + mapB.keys)
        .associateWith {
          sequenceOf(mapA[it], mapB[it]) // one of the sides may have null values in it (i.e. no entry in the map)...
              .filterNotNull()
              .distinct()
              .toList() // or if you require/prefer, do the following instead: joinToString()
        }
    
  2. Using groupingBy and fold (or have a look at: Group by key and fold each group simultaneously (KEEP)):

    (mapA.asSequence() + mapB.asSequence())
      .groupingBy { it.key }
      .fold(mutableSetOf<String>()) { accumulator, element ->
        accumulator.apply {
          add(element.value)
        }
      }
    

    You could also just use an empty String instead and concatenate in the fold operation the way you need it. My first approach just used a sequenceOf instead of the MutableSet. It depends on what you require and what you want to do with the result afterwards.

  3. Using Javas Map.merge, but ignoring duplicates in the value and also just concatenating the values:

    val mergedMap: Map<String, String> = mapA.toMutableMap().apply {
      mapB.forEach { key, value ->
        merge(key, value) { currentValue, addedValue ->
          "$currentValue, $addedValue" // just concatenate... no duplicates-check..
        }
      }
    }
    

    This, of course, can also be written differently, but this way we ensure that mergedMap is still just a Map<String, String> when accessed again.

0

Here's my solution:

val result = (mapA + (mapB - mapA.keys)).mapValues {
    (setOf(it.value) + mapB[it.key]).filterNotNull().joinToString()
}

It creates a map of A plus the values from B that are not in A. Then it maps all values to a set and adds the value from B to that set, ultimately removing all null values from the set and transforming it into a list, which you can use to create the desired output format.

  • 1
    yes... but it takes still some time to understand it ;-) e.g. first I wondered what mapB - mapA.keys really does... (had to look up that -) and instead of a setOf i personally prefer sequenceOf...distinct (it says more clearly what is going on)... but that's just my opinion... :-) – Roland Jan 17 at 17:38
0

Here is my approach with universal map-merging helper function:

fun <K, V, R> Pair<Map<K, V>, Map<K, V>>.merge(merger: (V?, V?) -> R): Map<K, R> {
    return (first.keys.asSequence() + second.keys.asSequence())
            .associateWith { merger(first[it], second[it]) }
}

fun main() {
    val mapA = mapOf("Emergency" to "112", "Fire department" to "101", "Police" to "102")
    val mapB = mapOf("Emergency" to "911", "Police" to "102")
    val result = (mapA to mapB).merge { a, b -> 
            listOf(a, b).filterNotNull().distinct().joinToString(",", "(", ")") }
    println(result)
}

Output:

{Emergency=(112,911), Fire department=(101), Police=(102)}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.