57

there are some informative posts on how to create a counter for loops in an R program. However, how do you create a similar function when using the parallelized version with "foreach()"?

2
  • 16
    Do you know how to accept answers on Stack Overflow? If not then please read the FAQ and go back over your previous questions. Mar 24, 2011 at 19:20
  • There is an example of foreach in the ParallelR blog here and I think it's worth to read :)
    – Patric
    Sep 26, 2016 at 12:13

7 Answers 7

57

Edit: After an update to the doSNOW package it has become quite simple to display a nice progress bar when using %dopar% and it works on Linux, Windows and OS X

doSNOW now officially supports progress bars via the .options.snow argument.

library(doSNOW)
cl <- makeCluster(2)
registerDoSNOW(cl)
iterations <- 100
pb <- txtProgressBar(max = iterations, style = 3)
progress <- function(n) setTxtProgressBar(pb, n)
opts <- list(progress = progress)
result <- foreach(i = 1:iterations, .combine = rbind, 
                  .options.snow = opts) %dopar%
{
    s <- summary(rnorm(1e6))[3]
    return(s)
}
close(pb)
stopCluster(cl) 

Yet another way of tracking progress, if you keep in mind the total number of iterations, is to set .verbose = T as this will print to the console which iterations have been finished.

Previous solution for Linux and OS X

On Ubuntu 14.04 (64 bit) and OS X (El Capitan) the progress bar is displayed even when using %dopar% if in the makeCluster function oufile = "" is set. It does not seem to work under Windows. From the help on makeCluster:

outfile: Where to direct the stdout and stderr connection output from the workers. "" indicates no redirection (which may only be useful for workers on the local machine). Defaults to ‘/dev/null’ (‘nul:’ on Windows).

Example code:

library(foreach)
library(doSNOW)
cl <- makeCluster(4, outfile="") # number of cores. Notice 'outfile'
registerDoSNOW(cl)
iterations <- 100
pb <- txtProgressBar(min = 1, max = iterations, style = 3)
result <- foreach(i = 1:iterations, .combine = rbind) %dopar% 
{
      s <- summary(rnorm(1e6))[3]
      setTxtProgressBar(pb, i) 
      return(s)
}
close(pb)
stopCluster(cl) 

This is what the progress bar looks like. It looks a little odd since a new bar is printed for every progression of the bar and because a worker may lag a bit which causes the progress bar to go back and forth occasionally.

4
  • A suggested improvement (I think it's sufficiently close to your idea not to warrant a separate answer): basically, write a newline to a tempfile with cat each iteration, then count the number of newlines (I use wc since I'm on Linux, but there are other solutions for Windows) and use this to update the progress bar. This has the advantage that it is monotonically increasing. Disadvantage is you have to read a file in every iteration -- not sure how slow this is. May 3, 2016 at 23:27
  • Thanks for the suggestion @MichaelChirico, but by now there's an 'official' way of doing this. I've updated the answer.
    – thie1e
    Aug 11, 2016 at 17:58
  • I can't seem to get this to work from within a function. Feb 25, 2017 at 7:45
  • The package doSNOW is superseded now.
    – epsilone
    Aug 24, 2020 at 20:37
10

This code is a modified version of the doRedis example, and will make a progress bar even when using %dopar% with a parallel backend:

#Load Libraries
library(foreach)
library(utils)
library(iterators)
library(doParallel)
library(snow)

#Choose number of iterations
n <- 1000

#Progress combine function
f <- function(){
  pb <- txtProgressBar(min=1, max=n-1,style=3)
  count <- 0
  function(...) {
    count <<- count + length(list(...)) - 1
    setTxtProgressBar(pb,count)
    Sys.sleep(0.01)
    flush.console()
    c(...)
  }
}

#Start a cluster
cl <- makeCluster(4, type='SOCK')
registerDoParallel(cl)

# Run the loop in parallel
k <- foreach(i = icount(n), .final=sum, .combine=f()) %dopar% {
  log2(i)
}

head(k)

#Stop the cluster
stopCluster(cl)

You have to know the number of iterations and the combination function ahead of time.

6
  • 2
    Hmm, this is strange. My function seems to update the progress bar in one shot, after the actual calculations are done...
    – Zach
    Jun 11, 2012 at 15:14
  • This method might only work with the doRedis backend. I'll have to investigate how to make it work with the doParallel backend.
    – Zach
    Jun 11, 2012 at 15:35
  • 9
    It won't work well with doParallel because doParallel only calls the combine function after all of the results have been returned, since it is implemented by calling the parallel clusterApplyLB function. This technique only with works well with backends that call the combine function on-the-fly, like doRedis, doMPI, doNWS, and (defunct?) doSMP. Mar 13, 2013 at 0:16
  • @Steve Weston thank you for the clarification. That makes a lot of sense to me, and now I understand why my function works on doRedis, but not doParallel.
    – Zach
    Mar 13, 2013 at 0:51
  • You might try flushing the console... untested.
    – IRTFM
    Jan 31, 2015 at 21:46
10

This is now possible with the parallel package. Tested with R 3.2.3 on OSX 10.11, running inside RStudio, using a "PSOCK"-type cluster.

library(doParallel)

# default cluster type on my machine is "PSOCK", YMMV with other types
cl <- parallel::makeCluster(4, outfile = "")
registerDoParallel(cl)

n <- 10000
pb <- txtProgressBar(0, n, style = 2)

invisible(foreach(i = icount(n)) %dopar% {
    setTxtProgressBar(pb, i)
})

stopCluster(cl)

Strangely, it only displays correctly with style = 3.

3
  • R 3.2.2 on Windows 10 doesn't seem to produce any progress bar with this code... Is this specific to >= 3.2.3 ?
    – Iain S
    Apr 4, 2017 at 10:50
  • @IainS I'd sooner ascribe the difference to operating system inconsistency than the R version. Apr 4, 2017 at 13:40
  • This seems to occasionally go down. It may not handle the asynchronous nature of the iterations (i = 15 could finish before i = 10).
    – passerby51
    Dec 1, 2020 at 21:47
10

You can also get this to work with the progress package.

what it looks like

# loading parallel and doSNOW package and creating cluster ----------------
library(parallel)
library(doSNOW)

numCores<-detectCores()
cl <- makeCluster(numCores)
registerDoSNOW(cl)

# progress bar ------------------------------------------------------------
library(progress)

iterations <- 100                               # used for the foreach loop  

pb <- progress_bar$new(
  format = "letter = :letter [:bar] :elapsed | eta: :eta",
  total = iterations,    # 100 
  width = 60)

progress_letter <- rep(LETTERS[1:10], 10)  # token reported in progress bar

# allowing progress bar to be used in foreach -----------------------------
progress <- function(n){
  pb$tick(tokens = list(letter = progress_letter[n]))
} 

opts <- list(progress = progress)

# foreach loop ------------------------------------------------------------
library(foreach)

foreach(i = 1:iterations, .combine = rbind, .options.snow = opts) %dopar% {
  summary(rnorm(1e6))[3]
}

stopCluster(cl) 
4
  • But I do not know the number of iterations - because there is a nested loop within foreach and I have no clue how to count the iterations. Are these really required?
    – Jens
    Aug 5, 2019 at 10:36
  • If you look at the help file for progress_bar, you can set total=NA although you no longer get a progress bar. I'm down to help you figure out a way to determine the number of iterations. Aug 25, 2019 at 7:41
  • If I change the iterations to 10000 I get "Warning: progress function failed: invalid 'times' argument" how can I solve this? Oct 21, 2019 at 19:30
  • If you only changed iterations to 10000 (assuming you are running the exact same code as above), the progress_letter variable needs to also be changed. Oct 22, 2019 at 20:20
6

You save the start time with Sys.time() before the loop. Loop over rows or columns or something which you know the total of. Then, inside the loop you can calculate the time ran so far (see difftime), percentage complete, speed and estimated time left. Each process can print those progress lines with the message function. You'll get an output something like

1/1000 complete @ 1 items/s, ETA: 00:00:45
2/1000 complete @ 1 items/s, ETA: 00:00:44

Obviously the looping order will greatly affect how well this works. Don't know about foreach but with multicore's mclapply you'd get good results using mc.preschedule=FALSE, which means that items are allocated to processes one-by-one in order as previous items complete.

2
  • are you using some sort of global counter, or are you relying on the index that's being looped over (i)?
    – C8H10N4O2
    Mar 11, 2016 at 18:30
  • @C8H10N4O2: The index looped over. With mclapply it gives good results with mc.preschedule=FALSE, and sometimes wrong, but usually close enough with the default (and usually faster) mc.preschedule=TRUE.
    – otsaw
    Mar 14, 2016 at 9:27
1

This code implements a progress bar tracking a parallelized foreach loop using the doMC backend, and using the excellent progress package in R. It assumes that all cores, specified by numCores, do an approximately equal amount of work.

library(foreach)
library(doMC)
library(progress)

iterations <- 100
numCores <- 8

registerDoMC(cores=numCores)

pbTracker <- function(pb,i,numCores) {
    if (i %% numCores == 0) {
        pb$tick()
    }
}

pb <- progress_bar$new(
  format <- " progress [:bar] :percent eta: :eta",
  total <- iterations / numCores, clear = FALSE, width= 60)


output = foreach(i=1:iterations) %dopar% {
    pbTracker(pb,i,numCores)
    Sys.sleep(1/20)
}
4
  • If you actually register multiple cores, this doesn't work. Aug 5, 2018 at 5:34
  • The above example seems to work as is on my MacBook Pro 2017, R v. 3.5.1. I believe one of the parellelism related packages above prevents multiple cores from kicking in if the actual work inside the loop is tiny. Try putting something more laborious inside the loop -it should work. Aug 6, 2018 at 6:15
  • But the above isn't even registering the cores? I don't think it actually farms out the tasks. To be clear the above works for me, but when I actually register multiple workers, it only returns the completed tracker at the end. try adding registerDoMC(2) before the %dopar% call Aug 6, 2018 at 6:36
  • @luke.sonnet, thanks for pointing out the missing line. After including registerDoMC(cores=numCores), I'm getting multiple cores firing up when I look at Activity Monitor on my Mac. To give you an idea, progress [====>-----------------------------] 15% eta: 12s, is what I'm seeing in the interim. Aug 6, 2018 at 6:49
-1

The following code will produce a nice progress bar in R for the foreach control structure. It will also work with graphical progress bars by replacing txtProgressBar with the desired progress bar object.

# Gives us the foreach control structure.
library(foreach)
# Gives us the progress bar object.
library(utils)
# Some number of iterations to process.
n <- 10000
# Create the progress bar.
pb <- txtProgressBar(min = 1, max = n, style=3)
# The foreach loop we are monitoring. This foreach loop will log2 all 
# the values from 1 to n and then sum the result. 
k <- foreach(i = icount(n), .final=sum, .combine=c) %do% {
    setTxtProgressBar(pb, i)
    log2(i)
}
# Close the progress bar.
close(pb)

While the code above answers your question in its most basic form a better and much harder question to answer is whether you can create an R progress bar which monitors the progress of a foreach statement when it is parallelized with %dopar%. Unfortunately I don't think it is possible to monitor the progress of a parallelized foreach in this way, but I would love for someone to prove me wrong, as it would be very useful feature.

1
  • 13
    This answer does not address the OP question in relation to parallelization, %dopar%
    – ctbrown
    Jun 19, 2014 at 18:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.