13

I have structure like below.

struct result{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    int d;
}

and union like below.

union convert{
   int arr[4];
   struct result res;
}

and I type pun as below.

  int arr1[4] = {1,2,3,5};
  union convert *pointer = (union convert *) arr1; // Here is my question, is it well defined?

  printf("%d %d\n", pointer->res.a, pointer->res.b);
  • @StoryTeller I'm sorry, it typing mistake. – KBlr Jan 17 at 14:29
  • 2
    Id you can assure no paddign in the structure - it is safe at list with gcc – P__J__ Jan 17 at 14:30
  • @AndyG; You're correct on the first point, but on the second, doesn't {1,2,3,5} initialise the array? – Bathsheba Jan 17 at 14:36
  • 2
    @Bathsheba: Darn me and me illiteracy – AndyG Jan 17 at 14:37
  • 1
    Hmmm, If static_assert(sizeof(convert.arr) == sizeof(convert.res), "Hmmm"); was added, I think the concern about padding is gone - Code would simply not compile when padding occurred. – chux Jan 17 at 16:53
12

pointer->res.a is fine but the behaviour of pointer->res.b is undefined.

There could be an arbitrary amount of padding between the a and b members.

Some compilers allow you to specify that there is no padding between members but of course then you are giving up portability.

  • 1
    @KBlr: Yep! Just not portable – AndyG Jan 17 at 14:37
  • 3
    pointer->res.a accesses an object (arr1) through an lvalue (pointer->res) in violation of C 2018 6.5 7. – Eric Postpischil Jan 17 at 16:13
  • 1
    @EricPostpischil So the aliasing rule applies not only to the "final" expression which is actually used to access (read or modify) an object, but to all glvalue subexpressions of the "final" expression? – Language Lawyer Jan 17 at 18:22
  • 1
    @EricPostpischil What I don't like in this aliasing rules, they talk about "expression used to access". I'm not sure does it mean only the "final" expression or all the subexpressions are also "used to access". Any authoritative references here? Also, arrays of different structures with identical definitions did not understand this. – Language Lawyer Jan 17 at 18:59
  • 1
    @LanguageLawyer: struct A { int x; }; and struct B { int x; }; have identical definitions but are different types. The C standard says they are not compatible, and one may not alias the other. If only the int x mattered, the aliasing rule would be useless. It is the fact that one structure cannot alias the other that enables optimization based on the aliasing rules. The aliasing rules must apply to the structures lvalues, not just the int. – Eric Postpischil Jan 17 at 20:14
6

Is this type punning well defined?

struct result{
    int a,b,c,d;
}

union convert {
   int arr[4];
   struct result res;
}

int arr1[4] = {1,2,3,5};
union convert *pointer = (union convert *) arr1; 

(union convert *) arr1 risks alignment failure.

A pointer to an object type may be converted to a pointer to a different object type. If the resulting pointer is not correctly aligned for the referenced type, the behavior is undefined. C11dr §6.3.2.3 8

There is no requirement that union convert and int share the same alignment. union convert requirements may exceed int for example.

Consider this possibility: arr1[] lives on int street where all addresses are multiple of 4. union and struct friends lives on "multiple of 8" street. arr1[] might have address 0x1004 (not a multiple of 8).

In 2019, alignment failures are more commonly seen with char (needing 1) and other types needing 2 or more. In OP's select case, I doubt a real platform will have alignment issues, yet incorrect alignment remains possible.

This type punning is not well defined.


Additional concerns

Other answers and comments discuss padding issues, which further identifies trouble.

@Eric Postpischil comment about improper access with pointer->res.a adds more reasons to consider this UB.

2

C imposes no rule about how much padding is left between 2 consecutive members of a structure.

This is why the implementations define many #pragma directives -- specially to change this behaviour.

So, as the answer of Bathsheba says, ...->b is undefined.

I answered the very same question some time ago, here.

1

Pointer punning is not safe. Use real union punning instead.

Assumptions: the struct is properly packed (no padding between the members)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>



struct __attribute__((packed)) result{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    int d;
};

union convert{
   int arr[4];
   struct result res;
};

  volatile int arr1[4];

void foo(void)
{

  union convert cnv;

  memcpy(&cnv, (void *)arr1, sizeof(arr1));

  printf("%d %d\n", cnv.res.a, cnv.res.b);
}

all modern compilers will optimize out the memcpy call

https://godbolt.org/z/4qtRIF

.LC0:
        .string "%d %d\n"
foo:
        mov     rsi, QWORD PTR arr1[rip]
        xor     eax, eax
        mov     rdi, QWORD PTR arr1[rip+8]
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        mov     rdx, rsi
        sar     rdx, 32
        jmp     printf
  • Why the volatile global? – curiousguy Jan 18 at 11:30
  • to prevent optimizing it out. The example is trivial and the compiler will otherwise just reduce it to the single const assignment. – P__J__ Jan 18 at 11:40
  • I don't follow you. – curiousguy Jan 18 at 19:38
  • @curiousguy so you need to read more about the optimizations. Try to remove the volatile and see what will happen. Try yourself that is the only way – P__J__ Jan 18 at 19:40
  • Actually you are the one who needs to read more. – curiousguy Jan 18 at 19:42

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