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I have the following simple application created with kivy gui framework. It is not the simplest one since label_1 has background color and its size is modified according to the text of the label. This is my very first experience with kivy. Unfortunately, kivy documentation and most of the examples accessible via google heavily use kivy language. My qestion is: how can I get the same result without kivy language using only python 3?

Code:

from kivy.config import Config
from kivy.core.window import Window

from kivy.app import App

from kivy.lang import Builder


MainScreen = Builder.load_string('''
BoxLayout:
    orientation: 'vertical'
    Label:
        text: 'label_1'
        font_size: 18
        color: (0, 0, 0, 1)
        size_hint: None, None
        size: self.texture_size
        canvas.before:
            Color:
                rgba: 1, .5, 0, 1
            Rectangle:
                pos: self.pos
                size: self.size
    Label:
        text: 'label_2'
        color: (0, 0, 0, 1)
''')


class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        return MainScreen


if __name__ == '__main__':

    Config.set('input', 'mouse', 'mouse,multitouch_on_demand')
    Window.clearcolor = (1, 1, 1, 1)

    MyApp().run()

How it looks:

enter image description here

2 Answers 2

0

The implementation of the code that you require is:

from kivy.config import Config
from kivy.core.window import Window
from kivy.app import App

from kivy.uix.boxlayout import BoxLayout
from kivy.uix.label import Label
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

mainscreen = BoxLayout(orientation='vertical')

label1 = Label(text='label_1', font_size=18, color=(0, 0, 0, 1), size_hint=(None, None))
label1.bind(texture_size=label1.setter('size'))
def update_rect(instance, *args):
    rect.pos = instance.pos
    rect.size = instance.size
with label1.canvas.before:
    Color(1, .5, 0, 1)
    rect = Rectangle(pos=label1.pos, size=label1.size)
label1.bind(pos=update_rect, size=update_rect)

label2 = Label(text='label_2', color=(0, 0, 0, 1))

mainscreen.add_widget(label1)
mainscreen.add_widget(label2)

class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        return mainscreen

if __name__ == '__main__':
    Config.set('input', 'mouse', 'mouse,multitouch_on_demand')
    Window.clearcolor = (1, 1, 1, 1)
    MyApp().run()

IMHO the implementation in kv is more readable and more flexible when done binding as in the case of the label that fits the size.


from kivy.config import Config
from kivy.core.window import Window
from kivy.app import App

from kivy.uix.boxlayout import BoxLayout
from kivy.uix.label import Label
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

from kivy.properties import ListProperty


class CustomLabel(Label):
    bgcolor = ListProperty([0, 0, 0, 1])
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        if kwargs.get('bgcolor'):
            self.bgcolor = kwargs['bgcolor']
            kwargs.pop('bgcolor')
        super(CustomLabel, self).__init__(**kwargs)
        self.bind(texture_size=self.setter('size'))

        with self.canvas.before:
            self.p = Color(*self.bgcolor)
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.pos, size=self.size)

        self.on_bgcolor()
        self.bind(pos=self.geometry_bind, size=self.geometry_bind)

    def on_bgcolor(self, *args):
        self.p.rgba = self.bgcolor

    def geometry_bind(self, *args):
        self.rect.pos = self.pos
        self.rect.size = self.size


class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        mainscreen = BoxLayout(orientation='vertical')
        label1 = CustomLabel(text='label_1', font_size=18, color=(0, 0, 0, 1), size_hint=(None, None), bgcolor=(1, .5, 0, 1))
        label2 = Label(text='label_2', color=(0, 0, 0, 1))
        mainscreen.add_widget(label1)
        mainscreen.add_widget(label2)
        return mainscreen

if __name__ == '__main__':
    Config.set('input', 'mouse', 'mouse,multitouch_on_demand')
    Window.clearcolor = (1, 1, 1, 1)
    MyApp().run()

Explanation:

  • bind: the bind(foo_property = callback) function is responsible for calling the callback when foo_property changes.

  • setter: the setter('foo_property') function generates a callback that allows you to set a value.

If you join both functions:

class FooClass(Foo_EventDispatcher):
    property_a = FooProperty(initial_value_a)
    property_b = FooProperty(initial_value_b)

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
       super(FooClass, self).__init__(**kwargs)
       self.bind(property_a=self.setter('property_b'))

equivalent to the following instruction in .kv:

<FooClass>:
    property_b: self.property_a
6
  • Thank you for the answer. Can you explain bind and setter?
    – user10325516
    Jan 17, 2019 at 19:37
  • @Poolka my first code only implements the logic sequentially so you could see the correlation of elements, in this updated code I have done it more efficiently than yours, in your case you clean the instructions and create others, and in my case only the reuse. also a brief explanation is added but if you want a more precise explanation read the docs.
    – eyllanesc
    Jan 17, 2019 at 20:12
  • Thanks for the addition with explanation. To be honest I decided to try kivy because it is written in python and stated to be pythonic in comparison with another gui frameworks for python. Now it seems kivy is not really suitable for complex/dynamic guis.
    – user10325516
    Jan 17, 2019 at 20:31
  • @Poolka What is pythonic for you? IMHO declarative languages are good for creating sight easily, but in the business logic part the languages that support OOP are the best. and kivy has both parties so to do code only with python code will be tedious and unbearable, at the beginning the kv language seems strange but as you work with the truth that is very simple. Going to kivy with respect to other libraries I recommend it for mobile, not for desktop.
    – eyllanesc
    Jan 17, 2019 at 20:38
  • @Poolka For desktop I prefer to use Qt (PyQt4 / PyQt5 / PySide / PySide2) since it is a mature and versatile library, and sometimes I combine it with QML since it allows to implement a view quickly (it is like the kv languange of Qt). Other libraries like tkinter I use to do minimalist things, pygame I almost do not use it, etc.
    – eyllanesc
    Jan 17, 2019 at 20:38
0

Another way to solve my problem - the solution based on @eyllanesc's answer and kivy crash course videos. I post it here for 2 reasons: (1) with this version one can clearly see what is going on - how and when background actually drawn - without another syntax layer (kivy language) and without bind and setter which are completely new for me, (2) eyllanesc provided a little bit messy python code.

Code:

from kivy.config import Config
from kivy.core.window import Window

from kivy.uix.boxlayout import BoxLayout
from kivy.uix.label import Label

from kivy.graphics import Color, Rectangle

from kivy.app import App


class LabelWithBackground(Label):

    def __init__(self, bgcolor, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(**kwargs)
        self.bgcolor = bgcolor
        self.draw_background()

    def draw_background(self):
        if self.canvas is not None:
            self.canvas.before.clear()
            with self.canvas.before:
                Color(*self.bgcolor)
                Rectangle(pos=self.pos, size=self.size)

    def on_size(self, *args):
        self.draw_background()

    def on_pos(self, *args):
        self.size = self.texture_size
        self.draw_background()


class MyApp2(App):

    def __init__(self):

        super().__init__()

        self.layout = BoxLayout()
        self.layout.orientation = 'vertical'

        self.labels = [
            Label(text='label_0', color=(0, 0, 0, 1)),
            LabelWithBackground(text='label_1', color=(0, 0, 0, 1), size_hint=(.5, None), bgcolor=(1, .5, 0, 1)),
            Label(text='label_2', color=(0, 0, 0, 1)),
            LabelWithBackground(text='label_3', color=(0, 0, 0, 1), size_hint=(None, .25), bgcolor=(1, .5, 0, 1)),
            Label(text='label_4', color=(0, 0, 0, 1)),
            LabelWithBackground(text='label_5', color=(0, 0, 0, 1), size_hint=(None, None), bgcolor=(1, .5, 0, 1))]

        for lbl in self.labels:
            self.layout.add_widget(lbl)

    def build(self):
        return self.layout


if __name__ == '__main__':

    Config.set('input', 'mouse', 'mouse,multitouch_on_demand')
    Window.clearcolor = (1, 1, 1, 1)

    MyApp2().run()

How it looks:

enter image description here

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