120

This question already has an answer here:

How do I check if a user's string input is a number (e.g. -1, 0, 1, etc.)?

user_input = input("Enter something:")

if type(user_input) == int:
    print("Is a number")
else:
    print("Not a number")

The above won't work since input always returns a string.

marked as duplicate by John Kugelman python Jun 5 '18 at 19:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I don't know whether in "input always returns strings", "returns" is correct. – Trufa Mar 24 '11 at 19:56
  • it looks like you're using python 3.x in which case yes input always returns strings. See: docs.python.org/release/3.1.3/library/functions.html#input – Daniel DiPaolo Mar 24 '11 at 19:57
  • @DanielDiPaolo: Oh yes, I'm aware of that, hence the question, I was just didn't know if the word return was correct. – Trufa Mar 24 '11 at 20:00
  • ah, then yes the term "returns" is precisely the correct term! – Daniel DiPaolo Mar 24 '11 at 20:02
  • 1
    @Trufa if type(eval(user_input)) == int: this might work. – user2728397 Feb 3 '16 at 7:01

24 Answers 24

227

Simply try converting it to an int and then bailing out if it doesn't work.

try:
   val = int(userInput)
except ValueError:
   print("That's not an int!")
  • 11
    This lets you accept things like 4.1 when technically only 4 is valid. It is also against the python mentality to have secret conversions like this happening and I would prefer to do strict checks at my public interface – Peter R Feb 19 '15 at 14:24
  • 1
    @PeterR I think this works if you convert from a string. – arhuaco Mar 5 '15 at 8:17
  • 2
    @PeterR You could use float() instead of int() – Anthony Pham Mar 5 '15 at 23:55
  • 2
    this one is not working to check if the value is boolean or integer, boolean is considered as 0 or 1. – Aryan Firouzian Feb 21 '16 at 22:19
  • 1
    @PeterR Not sure what you mean by "this lets you accept things like 4.1". DiPaolo's code throws ValueError on the string input 4.1 – Minh Tran Mar 30 '17 at 12:42
65

Apparently this will not work for negative values, but it will for positive. Sorry about that, just learned about this a few hours ago myself as I have just recently gotten into Python.

Use isdigit()

if userinput.isdigit():
    #do stuff
  • 40
    "-1".isdigit() == False – BatchyX Mar 24 '11 at 19:55
  • Does it work for float numbers? – llrs Jan 8 '14 at 15:23
  • 1
    I don't believe so, Llopis. I kind of jumped the gun answering questions before I knew enough back when I gave this answer. I would do the same as Daniel DiPaolo's answer for the int, but use float() instead of int(). – jmichalicek Jan 8 '14 at 18:50
  • Negative numbers and floats return false because '-' and '.' are not digits. The isdigit() function checks if every character in the string is between '0' and '9'. – Carl H Apr 14 '15 at 9:58
29

I think that what you'd be looking for here is the method isnumeric() (Documentation for python3.x):

>>>a = '123'
>>>a.isnumeric()
true

Hope this helps

  • 1
    Worth noting that in Python 2.7 this only works for unicode strings. A non-unicode string ("123456".isnumeric()) yields AttributeError: 'str' object has no attribute 'isnumeric', while U"12345".numeric() = True – perlyking Feb 14 '17 at 9:21
  • 1
    Also, there are some edge cases where this doesn't work. Take a = '\U0001f10a'. a.isnumeric() is True, but int(a) raises a ValueError. – Artyer Jul 17 '17 at 22:14
  • 5
    '3.3'.isnumeric() is False – Deqing Jan 23 '18 at 0:08
19

For Python 3 the following will work.

userInput = 0
while True:
  try:
     userInput = int(input("Enter something: "))       
  except ValueError:
     print("Not an integer!")
     continue
  else:
     print("Yes an integer!")
     break 
11

EDITED: You could also use this below code to find out if its a number or also a negative

import re
num_format = re.compile("^[\-]?[1-9][0-9]*\.?[0-9]+$")
isnumber = re.match(num_format,givennumber)
if isnumber:
    print "given string is number"

you could also change your format to your specific requirement. I am seeing this post a little too late.but hope this helps other persons who are looking for answers :) . let me know if anythings wrong in the given code.

  • This will check if there is a numeric (float, int, etc) within the string. However, if there is more than just the numeric, it will still return a result. For example: "1.2 Gbps" will return a false positive. This may or may not be useful to some people. – Brian Bruggeman May 28 '15 at 19:35
  • 1
    Also note: for anyone now looking, my original comment is no longer valid. :P Thanks for the update @karthik27! – Brian Bruggeman Aug 24 '15 at 14:30
8

If you specifically need an int or float, you could try "is not int" or "is not float":

user_input = ''
while user_input is not int:
    try:
        user_input = int(input('Enter a number: '))
        break
    except ValueError:
        print('Please enter a valid number: ')

print('You entered {}'.format(a))

If you only need to work with ints, then the most elegant solution I've seen is the ".isdigit()" method:

a = ''
while a.isdigit() == False:
    a = input('Enter a number: ')

print('You entered {}'.format(a))
5

Works fine for check if an input is a positive Integer AND in a specific range

def checkIntValue():
    '''Works fine for check if an **input** is
   a positive Integer AND in a specific range'''
    maxValue = 20
    while True:
        try:
            intTarget = int(input('Your number ?'))
        except ValueError:
            continue
        else:
            if intTarget < 1 or intTarget > maxValue:
                continue
            else:
                return (intTarget)
5

I would recommend this, @karthik27, for negative numbers

import re
num_format = re.compile(r'^\-?[1-9][0-9]*\.?[0-9]*')

Then do whatever you want with that regular expression, match(), findall() etc

  • good idea. clean and practical. Although it needs some changes for specific cases, say it matches 3.4.5 at the moment too – Jadi Dec 25 '15 at 8:06
  • why not just: num_format = re.compile(r'^\-?[1-9]+\.?[0-9]*') – skvalen Jul 19 '17 at 7:54
  • instead just convert to float – Giri Annamalai M Nov 11 '18 at 17:08
5

the most elegant solutions would be the already proposed,

a=123
bool_a = a.isnumeric()

Unfortunatelly it doesn't work both for negative integers and for general float values of a. If your point is to check if 'a' is a generic number beyond integers i'd suggest the following one, which works for every kind of float and integer :). Here is the test:

def isanumber(a):

    try:
        float(repr(a))
        bool_a = True
    except:
        bool_a = False

    return bool_a


a = 1 # integer
isanumber(a)
>>> True

a = -2.5982347892 # general float
isanumber(a)
>>> True

a = '1' # actually a string
isanumber(a)
>>> False

I hope you find it useful :)

  • 1
    This will return a float, rather than a bool, if the conversion doesn't fail. – Martin Tournoij Dec 15 '16 at 20:49
  • Thanks Carpetsmoker you are right :) Fixed! – José Crespo Barrios Feb 28 '17 at 19:02
4

You can use the isdigit() method for strings. In this case, as you said the input is always a string:

    user_input = input("Enter something:")
    if user_input.isdigit():
        print("Is a number")
    else:
        print("Not a number")
4

This solution will accept only integers and nothing but integers.

def is_number(s):
    while s.isdigit() == False:
        s = raw_input("Enter only numbers: ")
    return int(s)


# Your program starts here    
user_input = is_number(raw_input("Enter a number: "))
3

This works with any number, including a fraction:

import fractions

def isnumber(s):
   try:
     float(s)
     return True
   except ValueError:
     try: 
       Fraction(s)
       return True
     except ValueError: 
       return False
3

Why not divide the input by a number? This way works with everything. Negatives, floats, and negative floats. Also Blank spaces and zero.

numList = [499, -486, 0.1255468, -0.21554, 'a', "this", "long string here", "455 street area", 0, ""]

for item in numList:

    try:
        print (item / 2) #You can divide by any number really, except zero
    except:
        print "Not A Number: " + item

Result:

249
-243
0.0627734
-0.10777
Not A Number: a
Not A Number: this
Not A Number: long string here
Not A Number: 455 street area
0
Not A Number: 
3

natural: [0, 1, 2 ... ∞]

Python 2

it_is = unicode(user_input).isnumeric()

Python 3

it_is = str(user_input).isnumeric()

integer: [-∞, .., -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, ∞]

try:
    int(user_input)
    it_is = True
 except ValueError:
    it_is = False

float: [-∞, .., -2, -1.0...1, -1, -0.0...1, 0, 0.0...1, ..., 1, 1.0...1, ..., ∞]

try:
    float(user_input)
    it_is = True
 except ValueError:
    it_is = False
  • 2
    I'd like to know what is wrong with this answer, if you don't mind. There may be better ways to perform this task that I'm willing to know – Luis Sieira Jan 13 '18 at 14:29
1

I know this is pretty late but its to help anyone else that had to spend 6 hours trying to figure this out. (thats what I did):

This works flawlessly: (checks if any letter is in the input/checks if input is either integer or float)

a=(raw_input("Amount:"))

try:
    int(a)
except ValueError:
    try:
        float(a)
    except ValueError:
        print "This is not a number"
        a=0


if a==0:
    a=0
else:
    print a
    #Do stuff
  • Doesn't work if you input 0, one of the examples specifically mentioned by the OP. – Joooeey May 18 '17 at 15:58
0

Here is a simple function that checks input for INT and RANGE. Here, returns 'True' if input is integer between 1-100, 'False' otherwise

def validate(userInput):

    try:
        val = int(userInput)
        if val > 0 and val < 101:
            valid = True
        else:
            valid = False

    except Exception:
        valid = False

    return valid
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! This is an old question, and the accepted answer seems to be pretty good. Are you sure that you have something new to add? – Dietrich Epp Nov 11 '15 at 21:57
  • I thought it was a slight improvement: no less efficient while avoiding the nested if-else. I'm new here, if the answer hurts the community no hard feels if it's removed. – Jesse Downing Nov 11 '15 at 22:31
0

Here is the simplest solution:

a= input("Choose the option\n")

if(int(a)):
    print (a);
else:
    print("Try Again")
  • SyntaxError: 'return' outside function. Also, a is int will never evaluate to True. – N. Wouda Jan 6 '16 at 20:48
  • thanks @N.Wouda for your help , i have made the changes,check this – Pb Studies Jan 6 '16 at 22:31
  • Are you sure that your answer is actually contributing something new to this question? – N. Wouda Jan 6 '16 at 22:39
  • @N.Wouda actually I'm in a learning stage and trying to help others, so they don't get stuck in such basic problems. – Pb Studies Jan 6 '16 at 22:42
  • 1
    If 'a' is a string, int(a) throws an exception and the 'else' branch never gets called. Tested in python 2 & 3. – nevelis Sep 13 '16 at 20:26
0
while True:
    b1=input('Type a number:')
    try:
        a1=int(b1)
    except ValueError:
        print ('"%(a1)s" is not a number. Try again.' %{'a1':b1})       
    else:
        print ('You typed "{}".'.format(a1))
        break

This makes a loop to check whether input is an integer or not, result would look like below:

>>> %Run 1.1.py
Type a number:d
"d" is not a number. Try again.
Type a number:
>>> %Run 1.1.py
Type a number:4
You typed 4.
>>> 
0

If you wanted to evaluate floats, and you wanted to accept NaNs as input but not other strings like 'abc', you could do the following:

def isnumber(x):
    import numpy
    try:
        return type(numpy.float(x)) == float
    except ValueError:
        return False
0

I've been using a different approach I thought I'd share. Start with creating a valid range:

valid = [str(i) for i in range(-10,11)] #  ["-10","-9...."10"] 

Now ask for a number and if not in list continue asking:

p = input("Enter a number: ")

while p not in valid:
    p = input("Not valid. Try to enter a number again: ")

Lastly convert to int (which will work because list only contains integers as strings:

p = int(p)
0

I also ran into problems this morning with users being able to enter non-integer responses to my specific request for an integer.

This was the solution that ended up working well for me to force an answer I wanted:

player_number = 0
while player_number != 1 and player_number !=2:
    player_number = raw_input("Are you Player 1 or 2? ")
    try:
        player_number = int(player_number)
    except ValueError:
        print "Please enter '1' or '2'..."

I would get exceptions before even reaching the try: statement when I used

player_number = int(raw_input("Are you Player 1 or 2? ") 

and the user entered "J" or any other non-integer character. It worked out best to take it as raw input, check to see if that raw input could be converted to an integer, and then convert it afterward.

  • It's generally a good idea to only catch the exceptions you're handling. In this case it'd be ValueError. – Holloway Sep 11 '14 at 10:19
  • Thanks for the tip! I've edited the solution to include that feedback. That was my first ever SO solution! – John Worrall Sep 13 '14 at 16:40
0

try this! it worked for me even if I input negative numbers.

  def length(s):
    return len(s)

   s = input("Enter the String: ")
    try:
        if (type(int(s)))==int :
            print("You input an integer")

    except ValueError:      
        print("it is a string with length " + str(length(s)))   
-2

Based on inspiration from answer. I defined a function as below. Looks like its working fine. Please let me know if you find any issue

def isanumber(inp):
    try:
        val = int(inp)
        return True
    except ValueError:
        try:
            val = float(inp)
            return True
        except ValueError:
            return False
-3
a=10

isinstance(a,int)  #True

b='abc'

isinstance(b,int)  #False
  • When posting code, try to format it – Anton Oct 20 '15 at 8:57

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