60

I have (or wanted to have) some code like this:

IDictionary<string,int> dict = new Dictionary<string,int>();
// ... Add some stuff to the dictionary.

// Try to find an entry by value (if multiple, don't care which one).
var entry = dict.FirstOrDefault(e => e.Value == 1);
if ( entry != null ) { 
   // ^^^ above gives a compile error:
   // Operator '!=' cannot be applied to operands of type 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<string,int>' and '<null>'
}

I also tried changing the offending line like this:

if ( entry != default(KeyValuePair<string,int>) ) 

But that also gives a compile error:

Operator '!=' cannot be applied to operands of type 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<string,int>' and 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<string,int>'

What gives here?

57

Jon's answer will work with Dictionary<string, int>, as that can't have a null key value in the dictionary. It wouldn't work with Dictionary<int, string>, however, as that doesn't represent a null key value... the "failure" mode would end up with a key of 0.

Two options:

Write a TryFirstOrDefault method, like this:

public static bool TryFirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, out T value)
{
    value = default(T);
    using (var iterator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            value = iterator.Current;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

Alternatively, project to a nullable type:

var entry = dict.Where(e => e.Value == 1)
                .Select(e => (KeyValuePair<string,int>?) e)
                .FirstOrDefault();

if (entry != null)
{
    // Use entry.Value, which is the KeyValuePair<string,int>
}
4
  • You could also simply "double check" the result with exactly the same condition that you were looking for: dict.FirstOrDefault(e => e.Value == 1).Value.Value == 1 – Bernoulli IT Jul 3 '16 at 10:39
  • @YoupTube: That's one too many Value calls, and it won't do the right thing if the value you're looking for is 0. – Jon Skeet Jul 3 '16 at 11:18
  • 1
    Can someone explain how TryFirstOrDefault() is used? Where do I put my lambda expression and what is value? Is this only sample code? – testing Feb 10 '17 at 15:27
  • 1
    @testing: There's no lambda expression to put in - value is an output parameter which receives the value of the first element of the sequence if there is one, or the default value of T otherwise, just like (say) int.TryParse. You could create an overload accepting a predicate if you wanted, but you don't have to - you can use a Where call first, as per the sample code. – Jon Skeet Feb 10 '17 at 15:59
50

Do it this way:

if ( entry.Key != null )

The thing is that the FirstOrDefault method returns a KeyValuePair<string, int> which is a value type, so it cannot ever be null. You have to determine if a value was found by checking if at least one of its Key, Value properties has its default value. Key is of type string, so checking that for null makes sense considering that the dictionary could not have an item with a null key.

Other approaches you could use:

var entry = dict.Where(e => e.Value == 1)
                .Select(p => (int?)p.Value)
                .FirstOrDefault();

This projects the results into a collection of nullable ints, and if that is empty (no results) you get a null -- there's no way you can mistake that for the int that a successful search would yield.

2
  • Fyi... The first option doesn't work for non-nullable types as the key – KingOfHypocrites Mar 14 '12 at 13:11
  • @KingOfHypocrites just check for the default value of that type... such as 0 instead of null – Serj Sagan May 10 '13 at 23:37
8

Regardless of the types of Key and Value, you could do something like this:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var dict = new Dictionary<int, string>
        {
            {3, "ABC"},
            {7, "HHDHHGKD"}
        };

        bool found = false;
        var entry = dict.FirstOrDefault(d => d.Key == 3 && (found=true));
        if (found)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("found: " + entry.Value);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("not found");
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
4

The clearest code I think is this:

if (dict.ContainsValue(value))
  string key = dict.First(item => item.Value == value).Key;
else
  // do somehing else

Though from the standpoint of speed it's not nice, but there is no better solution. This means that the dictionary will be searched with a slow search a second time. The Dictionary class should be improved by offering a method 'bool TryGetKey(value)'. It looks a little bit strange - because a dictionary is thought to be used in the other direction - but sometimes it's unavoidable to translate backwards.

0

for nullable value types, just check.

if ( entry.Value != null ) { 
     //do stuff
} 

for non-nullable types check againts default value, for int, 0.

if ( entry.Value != 0) { 
   //do stuff
} 
2
  • What happens if the value generic type is a non-nullable? – Nathan Tuggy Jun 30 '15 at 1:42
  • Good point, in that case we would need to compare the default value of that type. for Dictionary<string,int> then (entry.Value != 0). In my case value type was nullable. – Yusuf Demirag Jun 30 '15 at 20:27
0
public static TValue FirstOrDefault<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, Func<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>, bool> where)
    {
        foreach (var kv in dictionary)
        {
            if (where(kv))
                return kv.Value;
        }
        return default;
    }
-1

To be fair, casting the object or using a select statement is unnecessary, I wouldn't rely on a try catch to fix the issue either.

Since you're using Linq anyway, what's wrong with using .Any?

var entry;
if (dict.Any(e => e.Value == 1))
{
    // Entry was found, continue work...
    entry = dict.FirstOrDefault(e => e.Value == 1);
}
else
{
    // Entry was not found.
    entry = -1;
}

Obviously, play with it to fit your solution, but it's a fairly quick check that stops if it finds an item in the collection with that value. So it won't check all values if a match has been found.

MSDN Documentation: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534972(v=vs.110).aspx

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.