9

Let the code speak for itself first with naive approach:

int heavy_calc() // needed to be called once
{
    // sleep(7500000 years)
    return 42;
}

int main()
{
    auto foo = [] {
        // And cached for lambda return value
        static int cache = heavy_calc();
        return cache;
    };
    return foo() + foo();
}

I want to have lambda internal cached value calculated on the first call. An naive approach is to use static cache, but it increases binary size and refuses to be be inlined.

I came up with creating cache in capture list and marking lambda as mutable, what inlines without problems, but requires cache to start with default value, which may break class invariant.


auto foo = [cache=0] () mutable {
    // And cached for lambda return value
    if(!cache)
        cache = heavy_calc();
    return cache;
};

My third approach uses boost::optional in mutable lambda

auto foo = [cache=std::optional<int>{}] () mutable {
    // And cached for lambda return value
    if(!cache)
        cache = heavy_calc();
    return *cache;
};

It works properly, but looks for me as kind of capture list + mutable keyword hack. Also mutable affects all captured parameters, so makes lambda less safe in real use.

Maybe there is an better/more clean solution for this? Or just different approach which ends up with the very same effect.

EDIT, some background: Lambda approach is chosen as I am modifying some callback lambda, which currently is used as: [this, param]{this->onEvent(heavy_calc(param));} I want to reduce heavy_calc calls without evaluating it in advance (only on first call)

4
  • heavy_calc should be called once inside the lambda or can it be called outside? ( the question is asked for thread safety reasons ) Jan 18, 2019 at 10:07
  • I'd love to call it only inside. I didn't take thread safety into account, but another naive solution with thread safety would be thread_local instead of static, right?
    – R2RT
    Jan 18, 2019 at 10:08
  • 1
    your answer with static is ok from a thread safety perspective. In C++11 from what I know you are guaranteed thread safe initialization of the static variable. Another option would be using call_once en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/call_once but I would go with static. Jan 18, 2019 at 10:11
  • So both thread_local and static are ok. My question about thread safety was related to on what thread should heavy_calc be called. And you answered that it should be called from the thread that is calling the first lambda function. Jan 18, 2019 at 10:17

3 Answers 3

5

To be honest, I don't see any reason to use lambda here. You can write a regular reusable class to cache calculation value. If you insist on using lambda then you can move value calculation to parameters so there will be no need to make anything mutable:

int heavy_calc() // needed to be called once
{
    // sleep(7500000 years)
    return 42;
}

int main()
{
    auto foo
    {
        [cache = heavy_calc()](void)
        {
            return cache;
        }
    };
    return foo() + foo();
}

online compiler

With a bit of template it is possible to write a class that will lazy evaluate and cache result of arbitrary calculation:

#include <boost/optional.hpp>
#include <utility>

template<typename x_Action> class
t_LazyCached final
{
    private: x_Action m_action;
    private: ::boost::optional<decltype(::std::declval<x_Action>()())> m_cache;

    public: template<typename xx_Action> explicit
    t_LazyCached(xx_Action && action): m_action{::std::forward<xx_Action>(action)}, m_cache{} {}

    public: auto const &
    operator ()(void)
    {
        if(not m_cache)
        {
            m_cache = m_action();
        }
        return m_cache.value();
    }
};

template<typename x_Action> auto
Make_LazyCached(x_Action && action)
{
    return t_LazyCached<x_Action>{::std::forward<x_Action>(action)};
}

class t_Obj
{
    public: int heavy_calc(int param) // needed to be called once
    {
        // sleep(7500000 years)
        return 42 + param;
    }
};

int main()
{
    t_Obj obj{};
    int param{3};
    auto foo{Make_LazyCached([&](void){ return obj.heavy_calc(param); })};
    return foo() + foo();
}

online compiler

11
  • 3
    I think the idea is to not call heavy_calc() if not needed, e.g., if you have some branches that may not use foo. Otherwise I completely agree about the reusable cache class.
    – Holt
    Jan 18, 2019 at 9:55
  • 1
    @GPhilo When lambda is constructed Jan 18, 2019 at 9:57
  • 1
    @VTT So in your return you'd call heavy_calc twice because of the double foo? Or is the lambda constructed only once when foo is defined and then called implicitly by foo's operator()? (Also, what is foo exactly? A nameless class? Some kind of function? I've never come up such a use of auto before)
    – GPhilo
    Jan 18, 2019 at 10:06
  • 1
    @GPhilo foo is a instance of anonymous callable class, heavy_calc will be invoked only once when foo is constructed. Jan 18, 2019 at 10:21
  • 1
    @GPhilo: then you need to take a look at brace initialization
    – papagaga
    Jan 18, 2019 at 10:34
2

It works properly, but looks for me as kind of capture list + mutable keyword hack. Also mutable affects all captured parameters, so makes lambda less safe in real use.

There is the solution to roll your own, hand-made lambda:

#include <optional>

int heavy_calc() // needed to be called once
{
    // sleep(7500000 years)
    return 42;
}


int main()
{
    struct {
        std::optional<int> cache;
        int operator()() {
            if (!cache) cache = heavy_calc();
            return *cache;
        }
    } foo;
    return foo() + foo();
}

It's inlined the same way and you don't need to rely on the capture+mutable hack.

0

I do believe this is exactly the use case for mutable lambda. If you don't want to have all variables mutable I suggest just creating functor class with one mutable field. This way you get best of both worlds (ok, it isn't that concise). The additional benefit is that the operator() is const (which is quite right, as it always returns same value)

#include <optional>

int heavy_calc() {
    // sleep(7500000 years)
    return 42;
}
struct my_functor {
    mutable std::optional<int> cache;
    int operator()() const {
        if (!cache) cache = heavy_calc();
        return *cache;
    }
}

int main() {
    my_functor foo;
    return foo() + foo();
}

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