-3

If have an array,

int amounts[26] = { 0, 0, 0, ...};

and I want each digit of the array to represent the amount of a different string, such that amounts[0] = amount; of 'a''s that are found within a given string, is there anyway to increment each value without using if statements?

Psuedocode example:

int amounts[26] = { 0, 0, 0, ...}; 
string word = "blahblah";
loop here to check and increment amounts[0] based on amount of 'a's in string
repeat loop for each letter in word.`

At the end of the loop, based on the string word, amounts should be as follows:

amounts[0] = 2 ('a')
amounts[1] = 2  ('b')
amounts[2] = 0  ('c')
// etc
3
  • Do you mean without if statements in specific, or without branching in general?
    – Daniel
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:07
  • 2
    If I understand, something like ++amounts[word[i] - 'a'];?
    – George
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:09
  • 1
    Are you okay limiting yourself to specific character sets or are you looking for a completely generic/portable solution? Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

5

Given your example, assuming the entire string is lowercase and valid characters, there's a fairly simply solution (that is to say, you handle the validation)

for (int i = 0; i < word.size(); i++) {
    amounts[word[i]-'a']++; // you can also do a pre-increment if you want
}
5
  • 2
    Do not that this is not portable. One of the character sets C++ requires support for (EBCDIC) does not map a - z to a contiguous range. Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:15
  • 1
    Just to add, since nobody's mentioned it yet, this isn't portable. Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:17
  • Agreeing on the EBCDIC issue - although most likely not of much relevance. More critical: What if we have both upper and lower case letters or non-alphabetical characters in the string?
    – Aconcagua
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:56
  • @Aconcagua if you read the first part of the answer "assuming the entire string is lowercase and valid characters, there's a fairly simply solution (that is to say, you handle the validation)"
    – Daniel
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 19:15
  • But if you wanted a more general (and I'd argue better) answer, one solution would be to make a mapping all desired characters to the appropriate indexes, and if the character isn't in the mapping it's an invalid char and can be handled however you want
    – Daniel
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 19:16
1

What you want:

const char char_offset = 'a';
const int num_chars = 26;
std::vector<int> amounts(num_chars, 0);
std::string word = "blahblah";

for (auto c : word) {
  int i = c - char_offset;
  // this if statement is only for range checking.
  // you can remove it if you are sure about the data range.
  if (i >= 0 && i < num_chars) { 
    ++amounts[i];
  }
}

for (int i = 0; i < (int)amounts.size(); ++i) {
  std::cout << (char)(char_offset + i) << ": " << amounts[i] << std::endl;
}

Output
a: 2
b: 2
c: 0
d: 0
e: 0
f: 0
g: 0
h: 2
i: 0
j: 0
k: 0
l: 2
m: 0
n: 0
...
3
  • 3
    "without using if statements" Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:17
  • This is only for range checking. You can surely skip it if you don't care it.
    – Eox
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:18
  • I don't really see why this is worthy of a downvote, some of it's a bit verbose but...?
    – George
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:30
1

Use std::unordered_map< std::string, int >. Note that std::unordered_map< char, int > would be more efficient if only a single character is required. std::string allows counting complex strings (e.g. map["substring"]++ )

Maps can be accessed using bracket notation ( e.g. map[index] ), and thus can effectively remove the need for if statements.

#include <string>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::unordered_map< std::string, int > map = {  {"a",0} };
    map["a"] += 1;
    std::cout << map["a"];
}
4
  • Seems like std::unordered_map< char, int > would be enough. And there's no need to initialize the map. operator[] will insert a zero element if the key isn't in use yet. Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:43
  • Why not std::unordered_map< char, int >? Paying for a std::string when you only need a single character is a bit excessive. Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:43
  • Also this can be more generic if you allow the user to specify the alphabet as a std::string, and then populate the map using a loop, i.e. std::string alpha = "abcdef...", then write a loop to populate the map starting from {a, 0}. Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:45
  • OP said he wanted to "to represent the amount of a different string," thus the use of std::string. I may have taken it too literally. Yes, char would be more efficient, but this is more flexible. I only initialized to make it easier to visualize how the values are held.
    – WeRelic
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 18:51
1

A general and portable solution would be

const std::string alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
for (int i = 0; alphabet[i]; ++i)
      amounts[i] = std::count(word.begin(), word.end(), alphabet[i]);

If you can assume the set of lowercase letters is a contiguous range, this can be simplified to

for (char c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; ++c)
    amounts[c - 'a'] = std::count(word.begin(), word.end(), c);

No (overt) if in the above. Of course, there is nothing preventing std::count() being implemented using one.

1

The following has quite some chances of being one of the fastest in matters of counting:

std::array<unsigned int, (1U << CHAR_BIT)> counts({ });
for(auto c : word)
    counts[c]++;

Getting individual values is quite efficient:

 std::cout << "a: " << counts['a'] << std::endl

Iterating over the letters - well, will require a little trick:

 for(char const* c = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"; *c; ++c)
     // case-insensitive:
     std::cout << *c << ": " << counts[*c] + counts[toupper(*c)] << std::endl;

Sure, you are wasting a bit of memory - which might cost you the performance gained again: If the array does not fit into the cache any more...

2
  • @Aconcagua - the minimum value of CHAR_BIT allowed is 8. (The C++ standards refer to the C standards for the specification of macros in <climits> and <limits.h>, and the C standards set a lower bound of 8).
    – Peter
    Commented Jan 19, 2019 at 9:52
  • Right; I misunderstood your answer. Deleted my comment. Commented Jan 19, 2019 at 14:35

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