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Please help me with the following MySQL query, which joins two tables (A and B):

SELECT * from A
left join B on A.sid = B.sid
where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5)
AND (rYear = 2011 or rYear is null)

roleCode is a field in table A and rYear is a field in table B

The result set is not as expected. Only 185 rows are returned, but there are 629 rows in table A that match the where condition. Shouldn't the rows without a matching row in table B be returned with null values for their B fields?

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  • 1859 rows with rCode in (1,2,3,5)?
    – manji
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 21:57
  • Yes, the problem isn't in your join, get rid of it and see what the results are.
    – J V
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 21:57
  • Sorry - there are 629 rows in table A that match the where condition.
    – greg84
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 21:59
  • Your logic is flawed that the results are incorrect with what you stated. The AND part of the statement could effectively return 0 results. If the row joins and it has a value other than 2011 it will not match. So your query could be completely correct and not return all the results that match just the first WHERE condition
    – nate c
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 22:57
  • @nate wrong interpretation. see my answer Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

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You should not specify rYear in a WHERE clause. Those limit your results after the join. You should specify rYear in an ON clause to get back records with NULL from table B.

SELECT * from A
left join B 
on A.sid = B.sid 
AND (rYear = 2011 or rYear is null)
where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5)
4
  • 3
    Hi Jage. This works great! However, have I misunderstood the MySQL documentation? SQL Server would return a load of nulls for the original query. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/left-join-optimization.html - specifically: "If there is a row in A that matches the WHERE clause, but there is no row in B that matches the ON condition, an extra B row is generated with all columns set to NULL."
    – greg84
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 22:04
  • 3
    you don't need the rYear IS NULL in the JOIN condition. using ON a.sid = b.sid AND rYear = 2011 is enough
    – user330315
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 22:10
  • 1
    @a_h // doesn't explain why the WHERE .. (OR rYear IS NULL) doesn't work? Any thoughts? In fact, if rYear is nullable, Jage's query and your suggestion return different data Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 22:13
  • @Richard: yes you are right. I was a bit too quick. Of course it makes a difference. Sorry (to Jage as well)
    – user330315
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 22:27
1

Greg, is that really all there is to the query?

Sample tables

create table A(rCode int, sid int);
insert A select 1,1;
insert A select 2,3;
insert A select 3,2;
insert A select 5,4;
insert A select 1,5;
create table B(rYear int, sid int);
insert B select 2011,1;
insert B select null,3;
insert B select 2011,2;
insert B select 2015,2;

Queries:

SELECT * from A
left join B on A.sid = B.sid
where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5)
AND (rYear = 2011 or rYear is null);

SELECT * from A
left join B on A.sid = B.sid AND (rYear = 2011 or rYear is null)
where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5);

Both of the queries are exactly the same, both returning:

rCode       sid         rYear       sid
----------- ----------- ----------- -----------
1           1           2011        1
2           3           NULL        3
3           2           2011        2
5           4           NULL        NULL
1           5           NULL        NULL

So I am surprised that Jage's query (the 2nd option) works for you but not your original. It would be different story without the inner or rYear is null.

Think of the LEFT JOIN like this [1]

SELECT * from A
left join B on A.sid = B.sid

Keep everything in A, and where matched in the ON clause, keep B otherwise pad B columns with NULL. Add the WHERE clause [2]

where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5)
AND (rYear = 2011 or rYear is null);

Using the output from [1], CUT down based on the filter, applied AFTER the left join. With the rYear is null, it should still keep all A records, on the proviso that the rCode filter is matched. However, if the filter in rYear is only

AND (rYear in (2011,2012))

It's a different story, because where B was not matched, the rYear was padded with NULL, which won't match the rYear filter -> the entire row gets removed, including the A record. Such a filter on rYear would have gone into the ON clause as shown below, otherwise might as well make it an INNER JOIN.

SELECT * from A
left join B on A.sid = B.sid AND (rYear in (2011,2012))
where (rCode = 1 Or rCode = 2 Or rCode = 3 Or rCode = 5)
2
  • Really helpful Richard thank you. There are several other fields in the tables and the query was a lot larger, but I cut the query down when trying to solve the problem, but also so it would be easier to read on here. Jage's solution was the only one I could get to work. If you give me your email I can send you details of the tables complete if you're interested? I've only ever done left joins in SQL Server it's a first for me in MySQL! :)
    – greg84
    Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 23:12
  • @Greg If you've done them in SQL Server, then you've done them in MySQL. They are the same. See the last bits about ON and WHERE clause differences, they should get you through. Commented Mar 24, 2011 at 23:14

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