2

I have a dataset where I am trying to select just the top n by counting one category, but then plotting using other variables in the dataset--basically one level of aggregation for the top n, but needing to go back to the full data to plot in ggplot.

So in the problem below, I want the two most common examNames and then plot and facetwrap them by count of year.

ap <- 
      tribble(
        ~year, ~examName,
        2014, "Statistics",
        2015, "Statistics",
        2016, "Statistics",
        2016, "Statistics",
        2016, "Statistics",
        2016, "Statistics",
        2017, "Statistics",
        2017, "Statistics",
        2017, "Statistics",
        2017, "Statistics",
        2017, "Statistics",
        2013, "Macroeconomics",
        2013, "Macroeconomics",
        2014, "Macroeconomics",
        2015, "Macroeconomics",
        2016, "Macroeconomics",
        2016, "Macroeconomics",
        2016, "Macroeconomics",
        2016, "Macroeconomics",
        2016, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2017, "Macroeconomics",
        2013, "Calculus",
        2014, "Calculus",
        2015, "Calculus",
        2016, "Calculus",
        2017, "Calculus",
        2017, "Psychology",
        2017, "Psychology",
        2017, "Psychology",
        2017, "Psychology",
        2017, "Psychology",
        2018, "Psychology",
        2018, "Psychology")


ap_top <- ap %>% 
    count(examName, sort = TRUE) %>% 
    head(2) %>% 
    inner_join(ap, by = "examName") %>% 
    select(-n)

ap_top %>% 
    count(examName, year) %>% 
    ggplot(aes(x = year, y = n, group = examName)) +
    geom_line() +
    facet_wrap(~ examName)

My thought is to get my top n, then inner_join back on the original dataset. Then plot using that; essentially using the inner join as a filter.

I know there's a better way to do this, and I would love a more elegant solution! I'm all ears! Example dataset given (sorry it's so long).

5

You don't need inner_join() I would just determine top two exams in a separate statement and then filter on those.

top_exams <- count(ap, examName) %>% 
  top_n(2, n) %>% pull(examName)

ap %>% 
  filter(examName %in% top_exams) %>% 
  count(year, examName) %>% 
  ggplot(aes(x = year, y = n, group = examName)) +
  geom_line() +
  facet_wrap(~ examName)
2

Another possibility:

ap %>% 
 group_by(examName) %>%
 mutate(temp = n()) %>%
 ungroup() %>%
 mutate(temp = dense_rank(desc(temp))) %>%
 filter(temp %in% c(1,2)) %>%
 select(-temp) %>%
 count(year, examName) %>% 
 ggplot(aes(x = year, y = n, group = examName)) +
 geom_line() +
 facet_wrap(~ examName)

It counts the cases per "examName" and ranks the count. Then, it filters the cases that have the greatest and the second greatest count.

  • What's nice about this solution is that you could do things with the dense_rank, like use it in fct_reorder for sorting in the plot. – talbe009 Jan 18 at 21:01

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