3

The macros println!() and print!() allow you to print strings and variables with and without a trailing newline, respectively. Additionally, the stdin() function provides a function to read a line of user input from STDIN (stdin().read_line(&mut string)).

It should be safe to assume that if the print macro and the read_line function were used consecutively, you should be able to write output and get input on the same line. However, the segments are executed in reverse order when this happens (STDIN is read first, then the statement is printed).

Here is an example of what I am trying to accomplish:

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let mut input = String::new();
    print!("Enter a string >> ");
    io::stdin().read_line(&mut input).expect("Error reading from STDIN");
}

The desired output would be (STDIN represents the point where the user is asked for input, it is not actually printed):

Enter a string >> STDIN

The actual output is:

STDIN
Enter a string >> 

On the other hand, the println macro does not reverse the order, although there is still the issue of the trailing newline:

Enter a string >> 
STDIN

In Python (3.x), this can be accomplished with a single line, because the input function allows for a string argument that precedes the STDIN prompt: variable = input("Output string")

I separated the task into the print macro and the read_line function after failing to find a solution in the Rust documentation that would allow something similar to the Python example.

  • 1
    have you tried flushing the output after the print! statement? Normally stdout gets flushed on newline. stdout().flush(); – belst Jan 19 at 0:16
  • I did not flush STDOUT. After reading further into the docs, I see now that you have to flush STDOUT manually when using the print macro, because it is not implicitly flushed until a newline character is encountered. Thanks a lot for the help, @belst! Feel free to post that as an answer, and I'll accept it as the best answer. – computer_geek64 Jan 19 at 0:29
9

stdout gets flushed on newlines. Since your print! statement does not contain nor end in a newline it will not get flushed. You need to do it manually using std::io::stdout().flush()

For example

use std::io::{self, Write};

fn main() {
    let mut input = String::new();
    print!("Enter a string >> ");
    let _ = io::stdout().flush();
    io::stdin().read_line(&mut input).expect("Error reading from STDIN");
}
  • 1
    I believe the Write trait also needs to be in scope for this to work. use std::io::Write; (referencing the flush() method) – jabgibson Feb 21 at 19:48
1

you should be able to write output and get input on the same line.

There is no concept of "same line" in stdin and stdout. There are just different stream, if you want to perform terminal manipulation you should use something that handle terminal, like console.

In Python (3.x), this can be accomplished with a single line, because the input function allows for a string argument that precedes the STDIN prompt: variable = input("Output string")

Well, here you go:

use dialoguer::Input;

let name = Input::new().with_prompt("Your name").interact()?;
println!("Name: {}", name);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.