14

I have this array:

var arr = [5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4];

I'm trying to sort ONLY the elements that are odd values so I want this

output:

[1, 3, 2, 8, 5, 4]

As you can see the even elements don't change their position. Can anyone tell me what I'm missing? Here's my code:

function myFunction(array) {

  var oddElements = array.reduce((arr, val, index) => {
    if (val % 2 !== 0){
      arr.push(val);
    }
    return arr.sort();
  }, []);

  return oddElements;
}
console.log(myFunction([5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4]));

I know I can use slice to add elements to array, but I'm stuck on how to get the indexes and put the elements in the array.

marked as duplicate by Nina Scholz javascript Jan 19 at 9:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5

One option is to keep track of the indicies of the odd numbers in the original array, and after .reduceing and sorting, then iterate through the original odd indicies and reassign, taking from the sorted odd array:

function oddSort(array) {
  const oddIndicies = [];
  const newArr = array.slice();
  const sortedOdd = array.reduce((arr, val, index) => {
    if (val % 2 !== 0) {
      arr.push(val);
      oddIndicies.push(index);
    }
    return arr;
  }, [])
    .sort((a, b) => a - b);
  while (oddIndicies.length > 0) {
    newArr[oddIndicies.shift()] = sortedOdd.shift();
  }
  return newArr;
}

console.log(oddSort([5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4]));
console.log(oddSort([5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4, 11 ]));

  • your solution doesn't work when I pass this array: [5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4, 11 ], it supposes to return [1, 3, 2, 8, 5, 4, 11], but it returns [1, 11, 2, 8, 3, 4, 5] – progx Jan 19 at 6:06
  • Ah, the 11 was throwing things off, since .sort sorts lexiographically - use a custom .sort function instead, see edit – CertainPerformance Jan 19 at 6:10
  • Thanks a lot bro! – progx Jan 19 at 21:21
8

First sort only the odd numbers and put it in an array oddSorted. Then map through each element in the original array and check if the current element is odd, if odd replace it with the corresponding sorted number from the oddSorted array.

function sortOddElements(arr){
   var oddSorted = arr.filter(ele => ele %2 != 0).sort((a, b) => a - b);
   var evenNotSorted = arr.map((ele, idx) => {
       if(ele % 2 != 0){
           return oddSorted.shift(); 
       }
       return ele;
     });
   return evenNotSorted;
}
var arr = [5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4];
console.log(sortOddElements(arr));
arr = [5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4, 11 ];
console.log(sortOddElements(arr));

  • easy-to-follow answer. now, can you think of a way to do this without having to do the % 2 != 0 calculation twice per element? :D – user633183 Jan 19 at 6:35
  • One thing that comes to my mind is checking whether the current element is included in the oddSorted array, if yes then replace the current number with the first number from the oddSorted array. This will also work as if the current element is included in the oddSorted array then it implies that the number is odd and hence there is no need to check it again. But do you think this will improve the performance? – Amardeep Bhowmick Jan 19 at 6:44
  • You don't need to clone arr. Filter will return a new array anyway. – kremerd Jan 19 at 8:32
0

I modified your code a little bit to fulfill your objective. Take a look below

function myFunction(array) {

    var oddElements = array.reduce((arr, val, index) => {
        if (val % 2 !== 0) {
            arr.push(val);
        }
        return arr.sort(function(a, b){return a - b});
    }, []);

    var index = 0;
    var finalElements = [];
    for(var i=0; i<array.length; i++) {
        var element = array[i];
        if(element %2 !==0) {
            finalElements.push(oddElements[index]);
            index++;
        } else {
            finalElements.push(element);
        }
    }
    return finalElements;
}
console.log(myFunction([5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4, 11]));

Remember, the default sort function sorts the values alphabetically. That's why you can't just use arr.sort()

  • Nope, your solution doesn't work when I pass this array: [5, 3, 2, 8, 1, 4, 11 ], it supposes to return [1, 3, 2, 8, 5, 4, 11], but it returns [1, 11, 2, 8, 3, 4, 5] – progx Jan 19 at 6:09
  • Okay... I'm taking a look at it – Tanmoy Krishna Das Jan 19 at 6:10
  • The problem was with the sort function. The default sort function sorts the values alphabetically. That's why you can't just use arr.sort(). I modified the code to reflect your needs. – Tanmoy Krishna Das Jan 19 at 6:18

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