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I have a subcollection for each doc in the users collection of my app. This subcollection stores docs that are related to the user, however they could just as well be saved to a master collection, each doc with an associated userId.

I chose this structure as it seemed the most obvious at the time but I can imagine it will make things harder down the road if I need to do database maintenance. E.g. If I wanted to clean up those docs, I would have to query each user and then each users docs, whereas if I had a master collection I could just query all docs.

That lead me to question what is the point of subcollections at all, if you can just associate those docs with an ID. Is it solely there so that you can expand if your doc becomes close to the 1MB limit?

  • 1
    One possible drawback of saving those docs under sub-collections (instead of a master collection) is that you cannot query across several sub-collections. – Renaud Tarnec Jan 19 '19 at 11:04
  • Right, that's what I was saying. I'm not considering moving to subcollections, I'm considering moving away from them. I'm wondering whether there's actually a good reason to be using subcollections in the first place – Hamish Johnson Jan 19 '19 at 11:28
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1

Let's take an example for that. Let's assume we have a database schema for a quiz app that looks like this:

Firestore-root
    |
    --- questions (collections)
          |
          --- questionId (document)
                 |
                 --- questionId: "LongQuestionIdOne"
                 |
                 --- title: "Question Title"
                 |
                 --- tags (collections)
                      |
                      --- tagIdOne (document)
                      |     |
                      |     --- tagId: "yR8iLzdBdylFkSzg1k4K"
                      |     |
                      |     --- tagName: "History"
                      |     |
                      |     --- //Other tag properties
                      |
                      --- tagIdTwo (document)
                            |
                            --- tagId: "tUjKPoq2dylFkSzg9cFg"
                            |
                            --- tagName: "Geography"
                            |
                            --- //Other tag properties

In which tags is a subcollection within questionId object. Let's create now the tags collection as a top-level collection like this:

Firestore-root
    |
    --- questions (collections)
    |     |
    |     --- questionId (document)
    |            |
    |            --- questionId: "LongQuestionIdOne"
    |            |
    |            --- title: "Question Title"
    |
    --- tags (collections)
          |
          --- tagIdOne (document)
          |     |
          |     --- tagId: "yR8iLzdBdylFkSzg1k4K"
          |     |
          |     --- tagName: "History"
          |     |
          |     --- questionId: "LongQuestionIdOne"
          |     |
          |     --- //Other tag properties
          |
          --- tagIdTwo (document)
                |
                --- tagId: "tUjKPoq2dylFkSzg9cFg"
                |
                --- tagName: "Geography"
                |
                --- questionId: "LongQuestionIdTwo"
                |
                --- //Other tag properties

The differences between this two approaches are:

  • If you want to query the database to get all tags of a particular question, using the first schema it's very easy because only a CollectionReference is needed (questions -> questionId -> tags). To achieve the same thing using the second schema, instead of a CollectionReference, a Query is needed, which means that you need to query the entire tags collection to get only the tags that correspond to a single question.
  • Using the first schema everything is more organised. Beside that, in Firestore Maximum depth of subcollections: 100. So you can take advantage of that.
  • As also @RenaudTarnec mentioned in his comment, queries in Cloud Firestore are shallow, they only get documents from the collection that the query is run against. There is no way to get documents from a top-level collection and other collections or subcollections in a single query. Firestore doesn't support queries across different collections in one go. A single query may only use properties of documents in a single collection. So there is no way you can get all the tags of all the questions using the first schema.

This technique is called database flatten and is a quite common practice when it comes to Firebase. So use this technique only if is needed. So in your case, if you only need to display the tags of a single question, use the first schema. If you want somehow to display all the tags of all questions, the second schema is recommended.

Is it solely there so that you can expand if your doc becomes close to the 1MB limit?

If you have a subcollection of objects within a document, please note that size of the subcollection it does not count in that 1 MiB limit. Only the data that is stored in the properties of the document is counted.

Edit Oct 01 2019:

According to @ShahoodulHassan comment:

So there is no way you can get all the tags of all the questions using the first schema?

Actually now there is, we can get all tags of all questions with the use of Firestore collection group query. One thing to note is that all the subcolletions must have the same name, for instance tags.

| improve this answer | |
  • So essentially it boils down to requesting a subcollection is faster, whereas querying a master collection is more flexible – Hamish Johnson Jan 20 '19 at 2:11
  • @HamishJohnson it is the same speed. It's totally up to you how you want to do it. I prefer the second choice just in case I want to use tags on something else later on. However, it does add up to the pricing. – Eray T Jul 24 '19 at 18:36
  • @Alex Mamo So there is no way you can get all the tags of all the questions using the first schema. Won't a collection group query on collections named 'tags' solve this issue now? – Shahood ul Hassan Oct 1 '19 at 8:52
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    @ShahoodulHassan As a matter affect there is, using firestore collection group query. Note that all subcollections should have the same name. I will update my answer. – Alex Mamo Oct 1 '19 at 9:00
  • 1
    @MobileMon No, there's no difference in cost. You only pay for the docs that you receive from the query. If a subcollection group query returns the same amount of docs as a master collection, it costs the same. – Hamish Johnson May 22 at 10:36

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