6

I expect Bluebird forgotten return warning to appear but it doesn't work for some reason.

A demo:

const Bluebird = require('bluebird');

Bluebird.config({
    warnings: true
})

Bluebird.resolve(1)
.then(() => {
    Bluebird.resolve(2); // should warn about forgotten return
})
.then(two => console.log(two));

How can it be fixed to output a warning?

I suspect I already encountered this problem before but I don't remember what was the solution.

2
  • Have you tried different versions of bluebird? Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 13:54
  • @Dimitar I'm using latest release, 3.5.3 (can be seen in a demo). I expect a warning to be there. Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

5
+100

It seems that long stack traces need to be enabled for the warnings to show. You can use the config object to enable them (docs) (demo):

Bluebird.config({
    warnings: true,
    longStackTraces: true
});

Or environment variables (docs) (demo):

In Node.js you may configure warnings and long stack traces for the entire process using environment variables:

BLUEBIRD_LONG_STACK_TRACES=1 BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS=1 node app.js

Both features are automatically enabled if the BLUEBIRD_DEBUG environment variable has been set or if the NODE_ENV environment variable is equal to "development".

and

To enable long stack traces and warnings in node development:

$ NODE_ENV=development node server.js

To enable long stack traces and warnings in node production:

$ BLUEBIRD_DEBUG=1 node server.js

See Environment Variables.


Edit as to why this is necessary:

It seems that both warnings and long stack traces are disabled by default, and are only enabled if a development environment is detected, see here:

Note that even though false is the default here, a development environment might be detected which automatically enables long stack traces and warnings.

To get warnings to show in a production environment, not only do you have to enable warnings, you have to enable long stack traces as well, see here and here.

4
  • Thanks. That's the solution. I've always been using it with long stack traces so the problem never occurred. An explanation (preferably from official sources,) why long stack traces are necessary to make forgotten return warning work is highly welcome because this doesn't seem to be something that goes without saying. Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 15:50
  • 1
    This page is the most official documentation I can find on it: "Note that even though false is the default here, a development environment might be detected which automatically enables long stack traces and warnings." Also, this comment shows that this behavior is intentional and this commit shows that this has always been the case. Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 16:29
  • See also @Adrian Pop's comment for information specific to stack traces (although that flag doesn't seem to affect the warnings not showing up). Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 16:33
  • Yeah, just tested it but it has no effect with node 9.x. Maybe it was just a 6.x+ issue.
    – Adrian Pop
    Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 16:38
2

You can configure the warning for checking forgotten return statements with a combination between wForgottenReturn and longStackTraces properties from the config object. wForgottenReturn is a property of warning and must be set to true and is the only warning type that can be separately configured. The corresponding environmental variable key is BLUEBIRD_W_FORGOTTEN_RETURN. You may check the documentation for more info.

const Bluebird = require('bluebird');

Bluebird.config({
    warnings: {
        wForgottenReturn: true
    }, longStackTraces: true,
});


Bluebird.resolve(1).then(() => {
   Bluebird.resolve(2);
}).then(two => console.log(two));

Running the program in the console gives me:

Warning: a promise was created in a handler at /home/adrianpop/test/bb.js:11:13 but was not returned from it, see 
    at Function.Promise.cast (/home/adrianpop/Downloads/Test/node_modules/bluebird/js/release/promise.js:196:13)
undefined

which is the desired output by you.

You can also run the application as:

BLUEBIRD_LONG_STACK_TRACES=1 BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS=1 node app.js, producing the same result.

Cheers!

Edit:

From this issue on github, we have that:

So the problem is that by default Nodejs 6.x does not display stack traces for warnings. There is a command line option (--trace-warnings) to enable them. Without this option Bluebird warnings are a lot less useful. Without the call stack, it can be very difficult to figure out where the warning originated.

More info can also be found:

2
  • Thanks. That's the solution. I've always been using it with long stack traces so the problem never occurred. An explanation (preferably from official sources,) why long stack traces are necessary to make forgotten return warning work is highly welcome because this doesn't seem to be something that goes without saying. Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 15:49
  • @estus Please see this github issue about Bluebird and no return warnings. It's actually a node problem and not a bluebird issue. I also updated my answer with additional links, so now you have an "official" answer :) Cheers!
    – Adrian Pop
    Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 16:27
1

In answering your question in one word,

How can it be fixed to output a warning?

By enabling long stack traces.

const Bluebird = require('bluebird');

Bluebird.config({
    warnings: true,
    longStackTraces: true
})

Bluebird.resolve(1)
.then(() => {
    Bluebird.resolve(2); // should warn about forgotten return
})
.then(two => console.log(two));

Which should now make you end up with a new demo that will flag you this error:

(node:65) Warning: a promise was created in a handler at evalmachine.<anonymous>:16:14 but was not returned from it, see http://bluebirdjs.com/docs/warning-explanations.html#warning-a-promise-was-created-in-a-handler-but-was-not-returned-from-it
    at Function.Promise.cast (/home/runner/node_modules/bluebird/js/release/promise.js:196:13)
undefined

promise.js file:


Promise.cast = function (obj) {
    var ret = tryConvertToPromise(obj);
    if (!(ret instanceof Promise)) {
        ret = new Promise(INTERNAL);
        ret._captureStackTrace(); //promise.js:196:13 
        ret._setFulfilled();
        ret._rejectionHandler0 = obj;
    }
    return ret;
};

Remember, In Node.js you may choose to configure warnings and long stack traces for the entire process using environment variables.


Going down into bluebird's source code


var warnings = !!(util.env("BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS") != 0 &&
    (debugging || util.env("BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS")));

var longStackTraces = !!(util.env("BLUEBIRD_LONG_STACK_TRACES") != 0 &&
    (debugging || util.env("BLUEBIRD_LONG_STACK_TRACES")));

var wForgottenReturn = util.env("BLUEBIRD_W_FORGOTTEN_RETURN") != 0 &&
    (warnings || !!util.env("BLUEBIRD_W_FORGOTTEN_RETURN"));

And

Promise.config = function(opts) {
    opts = Object(opts);
    if ("longStackTraces" in opts) {
        if (opts.longStackTraces) {
            Promise.longStackTraces();
        } else if (!opts.longStackTraces && Promise.hasLongStackTraces()) {
            disableLongStackTraces();
        }
    }
    if ("warnings" in opts) {
        var warningsOption = opts.warnings;
        config.warnings = !!warningsOption;
        wForgottenReturn = config.warnings;

        if (util.isObject(warningsOption)) {
            if ("wForgottenReturn" in warningsOption) {
                wForgottenReturn = !!warningsOption.wForgottenReturn;
            }
        }
    }
    if ("cancellation" in opts && opts.cancellation && !config.cancellation) {
        if (async.haveItemsQueued()) {
            throw new Error(
                "cannot enable cancellation after promises are in use");
        }
        Promise.prototype._clearCancellationData =
            cancellationClearCancellationData;
        Promise.prototype._propagateFrom = cancellationPropagateFrom;
        Promise.prototype._onCancel = cancellationOnCancel;
        Promise.prototype._setOnCancel = cancellationSetOnCancel;
        Promise.prototype._attachCancellationCallback =
            cancellationAttachCancellationCallback;
        Promise.prototype._execute = cancellationExecute;
        propagateFromFunction = cancellationPropagateFrom;
        config.cancellation = true;
    }
    if ("monitoring" in opts) {
        if (opts.monitoring && !config.monitoring) {
            config.monitoring = true;
            Promise.prototype._fireEvent = activeFireEvent;
        } else if (!opts.monitoring && config.monitoring) {
            config.monitoring = false;
            Promise.prototype._fireEvent = defaultFireEvent;
        }
    }
    return Promise;
};

On default long stack traces, warnings, monitoring and cancellation are all disable by putting them false on production environment. They get to be detected and automatically enabled when debugger is turned on in development environment.

I will suggest you go through bluebird's documentation one more time.

Promise.config

Promise.config(Object {
    warnings: boolean=false,
    longStackTraces: boolean=false,
    cancellation: boolean=false,
    monitoring: boolean=false
} options) -> Object;

Configure long stack traces, warnings, monitoring and cancellation. Note that even though false is the default here, a development environment might be detected which automatically enables long stack traces and warnings.

Promise.config({
    // Enable warnings
    warnings: true,
    // Enable long stack traces
    longStackTraces: true,
    // Enable cancellation
    cancellation: true,
    // Enable monitoring
    monitoring: true
});

You can configure the warning for checking forgotten return statements with wForgottenReturn:

Promise.config({
    // Enables all warnings except forgotten return statements.
    warnings: {
        wForgottenReturn: false
    }
});

wForgottenReturn is the only warning type that can be separately configured. The corresponding environmental variable key is BLUEBIRD_W_FORGOTTEN_RETURN.


In Node.js you may configure warnings and long stack traces for the entire process using environment variables:

BLUEBIRD_LONG_STACK_TRACES=1 BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS=1 node app.js

Both features are automatically enabled if the BLUEBIRD_DEBUG environment variable has been set or if the NODE_ENV environment variable is equal to "development".

Using the value 0 will explicitly disable a feature despite debug environment otherwise activating it:

# Warnings are disabled despite being in development environment
NODE_ENV=development BLUEBIRD_WARNINGS=0 node app.js

You might want to check this official source from one of bluebird's Contributor

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.