2

I've got two tables, b and a:

  • they have a one-to-one bidirectional relationship
  • a has a foreign key to b that defines this relationship
  • this foreign key is also considered as a primary key for a, and a JPA @ID
  • I want a cascade removal that deletes the related b when a is deleted
  • in MySQL, a's b_id is NOT NULL

The problem is that when I delete my A object with JPA repository, I get a ConstraintViolationException on its foreign key. I would expect that both a and b rows are deleted (cleverly starting with a's one).

How could I work around this knowing that I want to keep:

  • my DB schema the same
  • the cascade removal from a to b
  • the b id being the JPA @Id for a
CREATE TABLE `b` (
  `dbid` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`dbid`),
);

CREATE TABLE `a` (
  `b_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  KEY `b_fk` (`b_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `b_fk` FOREIGN KEY (`b_id`) REFERENCES `b` (`dbid`),
);

@Entity
@Table(name = "a")
public class A {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "b_id")
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "gen")
    @GenericGenerator(name = "gen", strategy = "foreign", parameters = @Parameter(name="property", value="b"))
    private Integer bId;

    @OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.REMOVE)
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn
    private B b;
}
@Entity
@Table(name = "b")
public class B {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy= GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "dbid")
    private Integer id;

    @OneToOne(mappedBy = "b")
    private A a;
}

[EDIT] After all discussions in answer comments and re-reading my question, the proposals with orphanRemoval indeed are in scope and work.

  • To help in diagnosing the problem, please provide SHOW CREATE TABLE for each of the two tables. – Rick James Jan 24 at 1:05
  • You're right @RickJames , it's more clear, done. – Pierre Mardon Jan 24 at 18:01
  • Thanks. Now, please justify the need for 1:1 mapping between a pair of tables. It is almost always "bad schema design" this early in the development. It is usually a kludge for expediency or performance when done later in development. – Rick James Jan 25 at 6:33
  • @RickJames I don't want to explain the full context of this design (not early at all in the development), anyway it's one of the hypothesis of the question. Given this, can I achieve the JPA design I target ? – Pierre Mardon Jan 27 at 18:55
  • I prefer to do cascading deletes (etc) in my own code. That way I don't have to wonder whether FKs will "do the right thing" or "not be able to do this complex cascade". – Rick James Jan 27 at 20:05
1
+50

If you want to delete object of B, whenever the associated A is deleted (it's the fourt point of your wishlist:

I want a cascade removal that deletes the related b when a is deleted

then you need to change your mapping in A to:

@OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.REMOVE, orphanRemoval = true)
@PrimaryKeyJoinColumn
private B b;
  • As already stated in @Narendra's answer comment, this is not what I want, some of my B can exist without a A, so I don't want orphanRemoval. Also it doesn't solve the main problem that is the ConstraintViolationException raising. – Pierre Mardon Jan 29 at 16:38
  • Do I understand it clearly - you don't want what you have specified in your question? – Andronicus Jan 29 at 17:04
  • @Andronicus, Your solution is correct. Only thing missed is ON DELETE CASCADE in table a. – Nisheeth Shah Jan 30 at 8:51
  • @PierreMardon please, accept an answer for your question and add post another one with the right specification, you're just confusing others. – Andronicus Jan 30 at 9:30
  • There's no right answer for my question right now, maybe Alan Hay's one that I'll try soon. You assume that orphanRemoval is applicable but this very specific behavior is completely out of the scope of this question. – Pierre Mardon Jan 30 at 17:15
1

In terms of just the MySQL side of your implementation, the records in table B have no 'knowledge' of any record in table A. In the database the relationship is unidirectional

The native cascade functionality exists to prevent foreign key errors, by telling the DB what to do when deleting a record would leave a foreign key pointing nowhere. Deleting a table A record would not cause a foreign key error in any table B records, so any native cascade functionality would not be triggered

To reiterate; You cannot keep the schema the same, and the cascade removal from a to b, because you don't actually have the cascade removal from a to b

You also mentioned in the comments that some table B records can exist without a table A records which isn't in the original question

To obtain the automatic deletion of table B records you describe, you have a few options with regards to the DB:

  1. Swap the relation over - Remove the current foreign key and add a nullable foreign key column in table B that references the primary key of table A. You can then put a cascade delete on this foreign key. Keep the new column null for the table B records that do not 'belong' to a table A record. You could also add a unique index to this column to secure a one to one relationship
  2. Add a DB trigger - On deletion of a table A record, add a DB trigger that removes the referenced table B record
  3. Add a DB procedure - Add a procedure that deletes a table A record and then the referenced table B record in turn, probably within a transaction. Going forwards, only delete table A records using the procedure
  4. Don't solve the problem at the DB level - Basically the same as option 3, but move the procedure logic out of the DB layer into the application logic

There may be something in JPA that solves your dilemma out of the box, but under the hood it will be doing one of the above (not option 1 and probably option 4)

  • I'm not completely sure that we understand each other: I want the JPA cascade and not the MySQL one. What you say is correct but my question was about the option 4 using JPA cascade. – Pierre Mardon Jan 30 at 17:11
  • @PierreMardon That's fair enough, but I'm guessing that any confusion you are experiencing at the JPA level is due to the fact that your cascade doesn't really make sense at the underlying DB level. I suspect your violation is happening because your JPA cascade is trying to cascade delete the related B before it deletes the targeted A (because this is how cascades normally work).. it cannot delete the related B first because it is referenced by the targeted A. What you need isn't really a cascade delete, because you want to delete the targeted A first and then the related B. – Arth Jan 30 at 17:39
  • 1
    Yep, I clearly understood that the design is bad, but I have to deal with it ;) Anyway there are plenty of workarounds (just do the cascade by hand in business code for starter), my question was about sharpening my understanding of JPA ;) – Pierre Mardon Jan 30 at 17:44
1

In order to achieve what you have asked, I have tweaked your tables as follows:

    CREATE TABLE b (
       dbid INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
    );

    CREATE TABLE a ( 
       b_id int(11) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY REFERENCES b(dbid) ON DELETE CASCADE
    );

CASCADE DELETE wasn't added in your DDL.

This will enable cascade delete. To delete the b record on deletion of a I made following changes in class A:

@Entity
@Table(name = "a")
public class A {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "b_id")
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "gen")
    @GenericGenerator(name = "gen", strategy = "foreign", parameters = @Parameter(name="property", value="b"))
    private Integer bId;

    @OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.REMOVE, orphanRemoval = true)
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn
    private B b;
}

That worked well. I hope it helps.

Find link here to the working solution.

  • JPA cascading delete has absolutely no requirement on a cascading delete being defined at the database level. – Alan Hay Jan 30 at 15:36
  • You have solved the issue by some completely different means - deleting B at the database level and not via the Entity Manager (via cascade). Such operations can have side effects: inconsistent data in session, no downstream (JPA triggered) cascades from B to,say, C, inconsistent data in the 2nd level cache, no execution of pre-remove entity listeners defined for B etc. – Alan Hay Jan 30 at 15:45
  • Agree with @AlanHay – Pierre Mardon Jan 30 at 16:55
  • @AlanHay, Agree that in such situation, it might cause problem if second level cache is used. Use of second level cache is always debatable. One has to be careful while using second level cache. This solution wasn't provided with the regards of caching. Neither it is included in the question. Yes, the use of cascade can be avoided here. Orphan removal does the magic here. Cheers! – Nisheeth Shah Jan 31 at 5:19
0

Can you try in class B to add the following

@OneToOne(mappedBy = "b", cascade = CascadeType.REMOVE)
private A a;

In addition, if in the database you have only a foreign key "a has a foreign key to b" can you also make a foreign key from b to a as well.

  • Maybe the text of my question wasn't clear enough, I just edited it, but I want the cascade removal from B to A and not the opposite. Also I don't want to change my schema. Thanks for the interest though. – Pierre Mardon Jan 24 at 18:03
  • Sorry, my mistake in the comment above, I definitely want a cascade from A to B, meaning that deleting a A should delete the associated B. – Pierre Mardon Jan 29 at 12:39
0

try with below code -

@OneToOne(mappedBy = "b",cascade = CascadeType.ALL,fetch = FetchType.LAZY,orphanRemoval=true )
private A a;
  • No, re-read the question, I want cascade removal from a to b and orphanRemoval is out of the picture. – Pierre Mardon Jan 29 at 10:49
  • in below answer you have replied just the opposite. could you post code of delete. – Narendra Pandey Jan 29 at 11:08
  • also read link regarding usage of Cascade.Remove and ophanRemoval . You may need to use orphanRemoval depending on how you perform the delete operation. – Narendra Pandey Jan 29 at 11:11
  • - orphanRemoval is very clear to me. Some of my B can exist without a A, so I don't want orphanRemoval. - in the other answer, I made a mistake in my comment, my question text is valid, I want a cascade removal from A to B, meaning that deleting a A should delete the associated B – Pierre Mardon Jan 29 at 12:36
  • I believe with your current code, you are not creating values in table A, if you persist data in table B. Now coming to your problem, you can still achieve what you require by using orphanRemoval property at table A's end as it will only delete what you require. It will only delete the associated data of table A from table B. Table B can still have it's own data as we are not making new entries in Table A. – Narendra Pandey Jan 30 at 10:17

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