8

I want to call a async function readUsers() within the constructor or ngOnInit(). Although I used a recommended workaraound from here it still is delayed and does not wait in execution.

async constructor functions in TypeScript?

How can I delay/wait with execution of my readUsers() function?

users: any[];

ngOnInit() {
    this.readUsers();
    //this.readUsers(); above is called delayed so this.users below is 
    //undefined
    console.log(this.users);
}


public readUsers = async () =>  {
    this.users = await this.userService.getUsers()
    .then(resolve=>{
        console.log("within async function");
        return resolve;
    })
    .catch(reject=>{
        return [];
    })
}


////////userService.getUsers() reads JSON Object from an endpoint (works!)
getUsers(): Promise<any> {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        this.http
            .get('https://url.com/users/')
            .subscribe(users => {
                if (!users) {
                    reject([]);
                }
                resolve(users);
            });
    });
}

The console.log is switched as there is no waiting:

undefined

within async function

2
  • This is something out of the context but I think there is no need of returning a Promise explicitly in your service (getUsers() function). http automatically does that for you. Correct me if you have any other reasons for using it. Jan 20, 2019 at 4:41
  • I believe you can call .toPromise() to convert an Observable to a Promise.
    – Ryan Haney
    Nov 15, 2021 at 18:22

1 Answer 1

5
interface OnInit {
  ngOnInit(): void
}

When something returns a void, then you can generally convert it to a Promise without any side-effects

async ngOnInit(): Promise<void> {
    await this.readUsers();
    console.log(this.users);
}
5
  • 4
    although the above code works, it is not recommended.
    – ABOS
    Jan 20, 2019 at 1:07
  • 3
    @ABOS - could you source that or explain the reasoning?
    – Ryan
    Feb 14, 2019 at 16:17
  • I think @ABOS is alluding to the fact that returning a promise from the ngOnInit may delay the rendering of your component (until the promise resolves), which is likely undesired. Nov 12, 2019 at 20:28
  • Unless the code calling ngOnInit awaits the returned promise, it will not delay the rendering of the component. It will continue to render, but as in the above example, may not have yet completed the call to readUsers.
    – Ryan Haney
    Nov 15, 2021 at 18:20
  • Angular deliberately doesn't call ngOnInit for services, only components. How would you do it for a component? Also if the caller doesn't handle the promise you can have problems with error handling. Apr 28, 2022 at 16:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.