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I am seeking ideas of how to approach this problem. My idea is a greedy approach.

The problem is:

You are working in Samara, Russia for a few days, Each day has a new pay per unit of work and a new cost per unit of food. Working 1 unit costs 1 unit of energy, and eating 1 unit of food adds 1 unit of energy. Here are some specifications of your employment:

+You arrive with no money, but with energy. You can never have more energy than you arrive with, and it can never be negative.

+You can do any amount of work every day (possibly not do any work at all), limited only by your energy. You cannot work when your energy is zero.

+You can eat any amount of food every day (possibly not have any food at all), limited by the money you have. You cannot eat when the money you have is zero.

+You can eat food at the end of the day, and cannot return to work after eating. You can return to work on the next day. Your true goal is to return home with as much money as possible. Compute the maximum amount of money you can take home.

For example, consider a 3 day stay where pay per unit work for each day is as follows: earning=[1, 2, 4]. The cost of food is cost=[1, 3, 6]. You start with e=5 units of energy.

*First day: 1 unit work is worth 1, and 1 unit food costs 1. There is no financial incentive to go to work this day.

*Second day: 1 unit work earns 2, and 1 unit food costs 3, Thus you spend more to eat than total earning so there is no financial incentive to go to work on this day.

*Third day: You earn 4 units per unit of work. The cost of food is irrelevant this day, as you are leaving for the home straight from work. You spend all of your energy working, collect your pay: 5 x 4 = 20 units of money and go home without buying dinner.

Function Description Complete the function calculateProfit in the editor below. The function must return an integer that represents the maximum earnings that can be taken home at the end of your stay.

My solution so far(needs to be improved):

function calculateProfit(n, earning, cost, e) {
    // Write your code here

    let sum = 0

    let ef = e;

    let count = 0;

    let max = 0;

    for (let i = 0; i < n; i++){

        if (i != n - 1) {


                console.log("next day " + ef + " " + ef * earning[i + 1] + "--" + ef * cost[i]);

                if (earning[i] > cost[i]) {

                    sum += ef * earning[i];
                    e = 0;

                    max = 0;

                    if (ef * earning[i + 1] > ef * cost[i] && sum > 0) {

                        //console.log(e);
                        sum -= ef * cost[i];
                        e = ef;
                    }


                }
                else {
                    count++;
                    max = Math.max(max, earning[i]);
                }             




        }
        else {//last day

            if (earning[i] <= cost[i]) {
                count++;                
            }

            max = Math.max(max, earning[i]);

            if (e > 0)
                sum += ef * max;

        }

        console.log(i, "-", sum," max=",max);

    }

    console.log("count",count);    

    if (count == n) {
        earning.sort();
        sum = earning[n-1] * ef;
    }

    return sum;

}
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  • 1
    What's the problem? What specifically are you asking? Jan 20 '19 at 1:40
  • I need some insights about how to solve the coding challenge
    – Luis17B
    Jan 20 '19 at 2:59
  • I don't see any reason why simple loop approach will not work here. Every day is a new day with full energy and it is not related to any choices made in the previous day. Jan 20 '19 at 3:40
10

Unfortunately, the different days cannot be considered separately. Consider an example where both labor and food is expensive on the first day and cheap on the second day. Obviously, you would work on the first day and eat on the second day.

So, how can we solve this? With a dynamic program. At each day, you have to make two choices: How much do you work and how much do you eat? At the end of the day, you have some total earnings and a certain amount of energy left. That energy amount can only have a few distinct values between 0 and the maximum energy.

Let's separate the two decisions and keep track of the maximum earnings for each remaining energy level. Let E_afterWork(day: i, energy: e) be the maximum earnings you can get after working on day i and remaining energy e. Similarly, E_afterEat(day: i, energy: e) is the maximum earning after having eaten on day i. We will keep track of these values over the days. In the end, we are interested in E_afterWork(day: totalDays - 1, energy: 0). This is the amount of money that we are leaving with.

For the first day, we can immediately set E_afterWork as:

E_afterWork(day: 0, energy: e) = earning[0] * (maxEnergy - e)

We do this for all energy levels.

Then, we have to gradually update E_afterEat and E_afterWork. These are:

E_afterEat(day: i, energy: e) = maximum over possible previous energy pe (E_afterWork(day: i, energy: pe) - cost[i] * (e - pe))

We have to examine all the pe values that are smaller or equal than e and where we can afford the food, i.e. the result is positive. The latter should be fulfilled automatically without doing anything special.

What are we doing here? We check all the possible outcomes of the current day (after working) and try to eat different amounts of food. We save the choice that gives us the maximum earnings (by calculating the earnings as the earnings after having finished work minus the cost for food).

Now, how to update E_afterWork? This is actually very simple:

E_afterWork(day: i, energy: e) = maximum over possible previous energy pe (E_afterEat(day: i-1, energy: pe) + earning[i] * (pe - e))

Same idea here.

Let's do your example:

earning=[7, 2, 4]
cost=[7, 3, 6]
maxEnergy=5

Let's initialize. I'll abbreviate E_afterWork with AW and E_afterEat with AE:

e | AW(0, e)
--+----------
5 |    0
4 |    7
3 |   14
2 |   21
1 |   28
0 |   35

Now update AE. For the first entry, we would calculate:

AE(0, 5) = max (0 - 0 * 7, 7 - 1 * 7, 14 - 2 * 7, 21 - 3 * 7, …) = 0

e | AW(0, e)  AE(0, e)
--+--------------------
5 |    0         0   
4 |    7         7
3 |   14        14
2 |   21        21
1 |   28        28
0 |   35        35

Next work day:

e | AW(0, e)  AE(0, e)  AW(1, e)
--+-----------------------------
5 |    0         0         0
4 |    7         7         7 = max(0 + 1 * 2, 7 + 0 * 2)
3 |   14        14        14 = max(0 + 2 * 2, 7 + 1 * 2, 14 + 0 * 2)
2 |   21        21        21
1 |   28        28        28
0 |   35        35        35

Eat:

e | AW(0, e)  AE(0, e)  AW(1, e)  AE(1, e)
--+---------------------------------------
5 |    0         0         0        20
4 |    7         7         7        23
3 |   14        14        14        26
2 |   21        21        21        29 = max(21 - 0 * 3, 28 - 1 * 3, 35 - 2 * 3)
1 |   28        28        28        32 = max(28 - 0 * 3, 35 - 1 * 3)
0 |   35        35        35        35

Work:

e | AW(0, e)  AE(0, e)  AW(1, e)  AE(1, e)  AW(2, e)
--+-------------------------------------------------
5 |    0         0         0        20       20
4 |    7         7         7        23       24 = max(20 + 1 * 4, 23 + 0 * 4)
3 |   14        14        14        26       28
2 |   21        21        21        29       32
1 |   28        28        28        32       36
0 |   35        35        35        35       40

So, you can earn a total of 40 by working on the first day, eating on the second day, and again working on the last day.

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  • do you mind recommend me a good book or resource to learn dynamic programming?
    – Luis17B
    Jan 20 '19 at 19:39
  • Not really. I think, the best way to do is to try some examples. Check the dynamic-programming tag. But be aware that not all questions with this tag are actually dynamic programming problems. Jan 20 '19 at 23:54

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