0

Let's take a piece of code like this:

<article>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
</article>

I would like to iterate these <p>-s using the tab key, and mark the currently selected <p> with CSS (outline or anything else). I have tried to add tabindex to the <p>-s, but it seems it does not work.

My questions are:

  • Is it possible to iterate non-input/link elements this way at all?
  • If it is possible, what is the pseudo-class to catch the current element?
  • Bonus: Is it possible to keep the iteration inside the <article>? I want the iteration to jump to the first <p> after the last, and vice versa.

A pure HTML/CSS solution would be better, but I am fine with JS as well.

2

Use tabindex="0" to p and in css :focus use background:red; and width:fit-content; to fit background only to text inside

Also use onmousedown="return false;" to prevent mouse click focus

p:focus{
background:red;
width:fit-content;
}
<article>
    <p onmousedown="return false;" tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p onmousedown="return false;" tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p onmousedown="return false;" tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p onmousedown="return false;" tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p onmousedown="return false;" tabindex="0">some text</p>
</article>

1

Is it possible to iterate non-input/link elements this way at all?

Yes, using tabindex works just fine for this.

If it is possible, what is the pseudo-class to catch the current element?

Yes, you can use a CSS :focus rule for the outline:

p:focus {
  border: 1px solid #ddd;
}
<article>
    <p tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p tabindex="0">some text</p>
    <p tabindex="0">some text</p>
</article>
This input isn't in the tab order:
<input type="text" tabindex="-1">

(tabindex="0" puts the elements in the tab order according to where they are in document order. Or, of course, assign them your own order.)

If you have elements that are in the tab order by default and don't want them to be in the tab order, you can remove them from it by using tabindex="-1". However, I wouldn't advise this for accessibility reasons. This is demonstrated by the input above.

Bonus: Is it possible to keep the iteration inside the ? I want the iteration to jump to the first

after the last, and vice versa.

I don't think you can scope it in that way without either making these the only tab-able elements on the page, or using JavaScript to catch it when you're leaving the last of them and explicitly focussing the first again (which I suspect would cause UX issues).

  • It would be the best to make these <p>-s the only tab-able elements. How can I achieve it? – Nekomajin42 Jan 20 at 13:24
  • @Nekomajin42 - You can make an element that's in the tab order by default not in the tab order by adding tabindex="-1" to it; see the updated answer. I wouldn't advise it, though. And note that even if you do that, on most user agents, tabbing from the last tab-able element on the page takes you out of the page entirely (in to the user agent's UI, such as the address bar). – T.J. Crowder Jan 20 at 13:43
  • 1
    I am working on an electron.js application, plus this document will be in an iframe with minimal markup, so it's not a problem. I will give it a try. – Nekomajin42 Jan 20 at 14:21
0

Select all the p's in your article. Set their tabIndex to 0. Then add an event listener on your window. If the last p in your article is focused, then the next focused element will be the first element of the p's list.

const ps = document.querySelectorAll('article > p');

ps.forEach((p)=>p.tabIndex=0);
ps[0].focus();
window.addEventListener("keydown", function(e){
  const code = e.keyCode;
  if(code === 9 && ps[ps.length-1] === document.activeElement){
    ps[0].focus();
    e.preventDefault();
  }
}, false);
p:focus {
  border: 1px solid black;
}
<article>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
    <p>some text</p>
</article>

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