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I just wrote a simple code in c which is supposed to extract a text from a file and replace a word with another. However, i dont know why , but my code is only replacing the word starting from the second letter. What am i doing wrong? This is my code :

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

 int main()
 {



FILE *f;

char sir[20];

if ((f=fopen("fis.txt","r"))==NULL)
{
    printf("Not ok");
    exit(1);
}
gets(sir);
fscanf(f, "%s",sir);

printf("Give the word you are looking for and the word to replace it with");
getchar();

char s1[10],s2[10];
gets(s1);
gets(s2);


char *p, aux[100];
while (p=strstr(sir,s1))

{
    strcpy(aux,p+strlen(s1));
    strcpy(p,s2);
    strcpy(p+strlen(s2),aux);
    puts(sir);


}


}
  • You never read from the file. You try to write to it but it is opened as read only. – Osiris Jan 20 at 22:41
  • 1
    Never, ever use gets(). It is so insecure and so prone to exploit by buffer overrun it has been completely removed from the C11 library. Use fgets instead and trim the trailing '\n' after your read. Whatever reference you used that makes you think gets() is OK, burn it immediately (whether book or teacher's assistant, no matter) – David C. Rankin Jan 20 at 22:45
  • You're doing an extraneous gets before the printf prompt. Also, gets is deprecated. Consider using fgets and manually stripping the newline (i.e. write a small function). Also, you need to do fgets inside the while loop to process all lines. And, you're only outputting the modified word, but not the rest of the line. So, if s1 were brown and s2 were black, and the input line was my brown cow smiles, you'd only get black as output instead of my black cow smiles – Craig Estey Jan 20 at 22:49
  • Also, what do you think these two lines accomplish when written one after the other? gets(sir); fscanf(f, "%s",sir);? What's in sir? Now would be a good time to read How to debug small programs and talk to the duck... Really, it helps :) – David C. Rankin Jan 20 at 22:49
  • i replaced gets() but it still doesnt work.. – Mary Poppins Jan 20 at 22:50
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I find your approach a bit too complicated, it can be done much simpler by just moving pointers instead. Here is a rough(1) sketch:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
  /* Input file */
  FILE *f;
  /* Buffer for content of input-file */
  char sir[100] = { 0 };
  /* Temporary memory to hold the result */
  /* char tmp[100] = {0}; */
  /* Memory for the word to find and the one to replace */
  char s1[10], s2[10];
  /* Pointer to the occurrence of the word to replace */
  char *p;
  /* Pointer to sir, the memory holding the content of the file */
  char *c;

  if ((f = fopen("fis.txt", "r")) == NULL) {
    printf("Not ok");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  /* Read content of file, leave room for the final `\0` */
  /* TODO: check return of fread() */
  fread(sir, 99, 1, f);

  printf("Give the word you are looking for and the word to replace it with: \n");
  /* TODO: check return of scanf() */
  /* HINT: you should read the two words separately. Ask for the word to find first,
   * read it and repeat that for the word to replace. */
  scanf("%9s %9s", s1, s2);
  /* Give user a change to stay in control. */
  printf("You are looking for %s and want it to be replaced with %s\n", s1, s2);

  /* We want to move through the input, we can do it quite comfortably with a pointer */
  c = sir;
  /* For every occurrence of the word to replace */
  while ((p = strstr(c, s1)) != NULL) {
    /* Print all characters up to the pointer p */
    /* TODO: change it to fill tmp instead. */
    /* HINT: I would use a pointer to tmp to do it but check the length! */
    while (c < p) {
      printf("%c", *c);
      c++;
    }
    /* Print the replacement / fill tmp */
    printf("%s", s2);
    /* Move the pointer to sir to the point in sir after the original word */
    c = p + strlen(s1);
  }
  /* Print / fill tmp with the rest of sir. Check the length if you use tmp! */
  printf("%s", c);
  /* Get outta here! */
  exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
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Continuing from my comment, never use gets(), it is horrible insecure and subject to exploit by buffer overrun. Instead, for line-oriented input use fgets or POSIX getline.

When reading a text file as input, you are correct to look at line-oriented input functions 99% of the time. It will work fine here, but you must insure your line buffer is sufficient to hold the largest line you anticipate.

You also should not attempt to modify the file you are searching through "in-place". While it is possible if the word to find and replace with are the exact same length, you must be careful or you will corrupt the file. Writing to a new file you are free to have your 'find' and 'replace' words be of differing length.

Presuming your word will be fully contained in the line you read (and not hyphenated or otherwise split across multiple lines), you can simply read each line, assign the a pointer to the starting character in the line, and then walk-the-pointer down the line, keeping an index when the character matches the characters in your find word, and outputting the replacement when characters differ. You have to think about how you will handle resetting the index, and handle partial matches, but that is simply a bit of arithmetic.

For example, if you have a pointer to an open file stream (e.g. fp) reading each line into buf and your word to find in find and the replacement string in repl, you could do something similar to the following:

    lfind = strlen (find);                  /* length of replacement */

    while (fgets (buf, MAXCH,fp)) {         /* read each line in file */
        p = buf;                            /* pointer to buf */
        while (*p) {
            if (*p == find[ndx])            /* if matches char in find */
                ndx++;                      /* advance index */
            else {  /* otherwise */
                if (ndx) {                  /* if find chars matched */
                    if (ndx == lfind)           /* if full word found */
                        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output replacement */
                    else {  /* otherwise */
                        int tmp = repl[ndx];    /* save char at ndx */
                        repl[ndx] = 0;          /* nul-terminate repl */
                        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output replacement */
                        repl[ndx] = tmp;        /* restore char at ndx */
                    }
                    ndx = 0;                /* zero index */
                }
                putchar (*p);       /* output current char */
            }
            p++;
        }
    }
    fclose (fp);                /* close file */

    if (ndx) {                  /* if partial match at end of file */
        repl[ndx] = 0;          /* nul-terminate repl at index */
        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output final chars */
    }

(you should further check the strlen of each line and that it fit and wasn't truncated, otherwise you risk the different parts of the word you are looking for being in two different buffers -- that is left to you)

Note also the check after the loop exits there is a check to output any final characters if ndx is non-zero.

Putting into a short example that takes the filename to read and find/repl strings as arguments 1, 2, 3 to the program (or will prompt for find/repl if not provided as arguments), you could do something like the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAXCH 1024
#define MAXWD  128

void handle_args (int argc, char **argv, char *find, char *repl);

int main (int argc, char **argv) {

    size_t lfind, ndx = 0;
    char buf[MAXCH], find[MAXWD] = "", repl[MAXWD] = "", *p;
    FILE *fp = NULL;

    if (argc < 2 ) {    /* validate at least one argument given */
        fprintf (stderr, "error: insufficient input, usage: "
                        "%s filename [find, repl]\n", argv[0]);
        return 1;
    }
    if (!(fp = fopen (argv[1], "r"))) { /* validate file open for reading */
        perror ("file open failed");
        return 1;
    }

    handle_args (argc, argv, find, repl);   /* set/prompt for find/repl */
    lfind = strlen (find);                  /* length of replacement */

    while (fgets (buf, MAXCH,fp)) {         /* read each line in file */
        p = buf;                            /* pointer to buf */
        while (*p) {
            if (*p == find[ndx])            /* if matches char in find */
                ndx++;                      /* advance index */
            else {  /* otherwise */
                if (ndx) {                  /* if find chars matched */
                    if (ndx == lfind)           /* if full word found */
                        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output replacement */
                    else {  /* otherwise */
                        int tmp = repl[ndx];    /* save char at ndx */
                        repl[ndx] = 0;          /* nul-terminate repl */
                        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output replacement */
                        repl[ndx] = tmp;        /* restore char at ndx */
                    }
                    ndx = 0;                /* zero index */
                }
                putchar (*p);       /* output current char */
            }
            p++;
        }
    }
    fclose (fp);                /* close file */

    if (ndx) {                  /* if partial match at end of file */
        repl[ndx] = 0;          /* nul-terminate repl at index */
        fputs (repl, stdout);   /* output final chars */
    }

    return 0;
}

/* simple function to set find/repl from command line, or 
 * prompt for input if no arguments given.
 */
void handle_args (int argc, char **argv, char *find, char *repl)
{
    if (argc < 3) {
        fputs ("enter find word: ", stdout);
        if (scanf ("%127s", find) != 1) {
            fputs ("error: invalid input.\n", stderr);
            exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }
    else {
        size_t len = strlen (argv[2]);
        if (len < MAXWD)
            memcpy (find, argv[2], len + 1);
        else {
            fputs ("error: find argument too long.\n", stderr);
            exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    if (argc < 4) {
        fputs ("enter repl word: ", stdout);
        if (scanf ("%127s", repl) != 1) {
            fputs ("error: invalid input.\n", stderr);
            exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }
    else {
        size_t len = strlen (argv[3]);
        if (len < MAXWD)
            memcpy (repl, argv[3], len + 1);
        else {
            fputs ("error: repl argument too long.\n", stderr);
            exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }
}

Example Input File

$ cat ../dat/qbfox3.txt
A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
A slow green dog jumps on top of the blue cat.
A quick blue bird flew over the lazy dog too.

Example Use/Output

$ ./bin/file_replace_fgets_stdout ../dat/qbfox3.txt dog duck
A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy duck.
A slow green duck jumps on top of the blue cat.
A quick blue bird flew over the lazy duck too.

Or checking corner-cases of first and last character replacement, e.g.

$ ./bin/file_replace_fgets_stdout ../dat/qbfox3.txt "." "*"
A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog*
A slow green dog jumps on top of the blue cat*
A quick blue bird flew over the lazy dog too*

$ ./bin/file_replace_fgets_stdout ../dat/qbfox3.txt A B
B quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
B slow green dog jumps on top of the blue cat.
B quick blue bird flew over the lazy dog too.

Look things over and let me know if you have further questions.

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