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I need some help understanding how one can test an application using React Context.

Here's my sample setup.

context.js

import React from 'react'

export const AppContext = React.createContext()

App.js

import React from 'react'

import MyComponent from './MyComponent'
import {AppContext} from './context'

const App extends React.Component {

  state = {
    items: []
  }

  handleItemAdd = newItem => {
    const {items} = this.state
    items.push(newItem)
    this.setState(items)
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <AppContext.Provider value={{
        addItem: this.handleItemAdd
      }}>
        <MyComponent />
      </AppContext.Provider>
    )
  }
}

export default App

MyComponent.js

import React from 'react'

import {AppContext} from './context'

const MyComponent extends React.Component {    
  render() {
    return (
      <AppContext.Consumer>
        {addItem => 
          <button onClick={() => addItem('new item')}>
            Click me
          </button>
        }
      </AppContext.Consumer>
    )
  }
}

export default MyComponent

This is a simplified example. Imagine that there are more layers between App and MyComponent, hence the use of React Context.

And here's my test file for MyComponent.

MyComponent.test.js

import React from 'react'
import {render, fireEvent} from 'react-testing-library'

test('component handles button click', () => {
  const {getByText} = render(
    <MyComponent />
  )
  const button = getByText('Click me')
  fireEvent.click(button)
  expect...?
}

The thing is, AppContext.Consumer is part of the implementation of MyComponent, so in this test I don't have direct access to it. How do I mock AppContext.Consumer so I am actually able to verify that clicking a button fires a function call?

I know that in theory I can test this by rendering MyComponent in my App, but I want to write a unit test for MyComponent only.

  • 3
    take a look into react-testing-library's docs: testing-library.com/docs/example-react-context – skyboyer Jan 21 '19 at 14:52
  • Thanks for pointing me to the example. So, is manually wrapping MyComponent in AppContext.Provider in each test the only way then? – artooras Jan 21 '19 at 14:58
  • it looks this way. enzyme's shallow() allows passing in context as an argument. but react-testing-library does not. – skyboyer Jan 21 '19 at 15:02
  • @skyboyer, Enzyme's shallow does not work with context in no way. – Green Mar 5 at 18:41
37

You just render the context with your component.

const addItem = jest.fn()
render(
  <AppContext.Provider value={{ addItem }}>
    <MyComponent />
  </ApppContext.Provider>
)

See Mocking context with react-testing-library

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Wow, that was so much simpler than I was expecting, thanks so much! – woolm110 Dec 9 '19 at 14:32

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