401

How do I get the number of days between two dates in JavaScript? For example, given two dates in input boxes:

<input id="first" value="1/1/2000"/>
<input id="second" value="1/1/2001"/>

<script>
  alert(datediff("day", first, second)); // what goes here?
</script>
  • 5
    99% of the cases where the user asks for "number of days between two dates" what she doesn't understand is that she is trying to compare apples with pears. The problem becomes so simple if asked "How many DATES are there in a DATE RANGE?", Or how many squares I have to cross on the calendar. This leaves off time and daylight saving issues etc etc.The confusion is implied on us because of the datetime data structure which is pure nonsense. There is no such thing as datetime there is date and there is time, two very distinct objects in both nature and behavior – Mihail Shishkov May 24 '17 at 17:07
  • For a function that splits the difference into (whole) units of time, use the answer at stackoverflow.com/a/53092438/3787376. – Edward Oct 31 '18 at 21:58
  • I feel this question should be deleted or at least marked "avoid" as most of the answers are either incorrect or dependent on various libraries. – RobG Mar 16 '19 at 22:09

37 Answers 37

405

Here is a quick and dirty implementation of datediff, as a proof of concept to solve the problem as presented in the question. It relies on the fact that you can get the elapsed milliseconds between two dates by subtracting them, which coerces them into their primitive number value (milliseconds since the start of 1970).

// new Date("dateString") is browser-dependent and discouraged, so we'll write
// a simple parse function for U.S. date format (which does no error checking)
function parseDate(str) {
    var mdy = str.split('/');
    return new Date(mdy[2], mdy[0]-1, mdy[1]);
}

function datediff(first, second) {
    // Take the difference between the dates and divide by milliseconds per day.
    // Round to nearest whole number to deal with DST.
    return Math.round((second-first)/(1000*60*60*24));
}

alert(datediff(parseDate(first.value), parseDate(second.value)));
<input id="first" value="1/1/2000"/>
<input id="second" value="1/1/2001"/>

You should be aware that the "normal" Date APIs (without "UTC" in the name) operate in the local timezone of the user's browser, so in general you could run into issues if your user is in a timezone that you don't expect, and your code will have to deal with Daylight Saving Time transitions. You should carefully read the documentation for the Date object and its methods, and for anything more complicated, strongly consider using a library that offers more safe and powerful APIs for date manipulation.

Also, for illustration purposes, the snippet uses named access on the window object for brevity, but in production you should use standardized APIs like getElementById, or more likely, some UI framework.

  • 2
    I think Math.trunc() is more appropriate. Just in case someone uses more precise Date objects (i.e. including hours, minutes and seconds) – Jin Wang Jul 6 '16 at 19:46
  • 21
    As the answer that's marked correct and highest voted (as of now), it's worth commenting that this answer doesn't correctly handle Daylight Savings Time. See Michael Liu's answer instead. – osullic Sep 21 '16 at 0:01
  • What does parseDate do exactly? – Mohammad Kermani Nov 27 '16 at 9:15
  • 1
    @osullic—this answer handles daylight saving with Math.round, however it does expect to be handed date only strings, not date and time. – RobG Feb 17 '17 at 1:00
  • @M98—it's a help function to ensure the date string is correctly parsed. It's very sensible to not rely on the Date constructor or Date.parse for parsing. – RobG Feb 17 '17 at 1:08
201

As of this writing, only one of the other answers correctly handles DST (daylight saving time) transitions. Here are the results on a system located in California:

                                        1/1/2013- 3/10/2013- 11/3/2013-
User       Formula                      2/1/2013  3/11/2013  11/4/2013  Result
---------  ---------------------------  --------  ---------  ---------  ---------
Miles                   (d2 - d1) / N   31        0.9583333  1.0416666  Incorrect
some         Math.floor((d2 - d1) / N)  31        0          1          Incorrect
fuentesjr    Math.round((d2 - d1) / N)  31        1          1          Correct
toloco     Math.ceiling((d2 - d1) / N)  31        1          2          Incorrect

N = 86400000

Although Math.round returns the correct results, I think it's somewhat clunky. Instead, by explicitly accounting for changes to the UTC offset when DST begins or ends, we can use exact arithmetic:

function treatAsUTC(date) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setMinutes(result.getMinutes() - result.getTimezoneOffset());
    return result;
}

function daysBetween(startDate, endDate) {
    var millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
    return (treatAsUTC(endDate) - treatAsUTC(startDate)) / millisecondsPerDay;
}

alert(daysBetween($('#first').val(), $('#second').val()));

Explanation

JavaScript date calculations are tricky because Date objects store times internally in UTC, not local time. For example, 3/10/2013 12:00 AM Pacific Standard Time (UTC-08:00) is stored as 3/10/2013 8:00 AM UTC, and 3/11/2013 12:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-07:00) is stored as 3/11/2013 7:00 AM UTC. On this day, midnight to midnight local time is only 23 hours in UTC!

Although a day in local time can have more or less than 24 hours, a day in UTC is always exactly 24 hours.1 The daysBetween method shown above takes advantage of this fact by first calling treatAsUTC to adjust both local times to midnight UTC, before subtracting and dividing.

1. JavaScript ignores leap seconds.

  • 1
    There is no need to use UTC, it's fine to just set the local hours to midnight (or the same value for both dates). The fractional day introduced by daylight saving is only ±0.04 at most (and in some places less), so it rounds out with Math.round. ;-) Relying on the Date constructor to parse strings is not a good idea. If you really want to use UTC values, parse the strings using Date.UTC(...) in the first place. – RobG Feb 17 '17 at 1:07
  • 2
    @RobG: As I stated in my answer: "Although Math.round returns the correct results, I think it's somewhat clunky. Instead, by explicitly accounting for changes to the UTC offset when DST begins or ends, we can use exact arithmetic." – Michael Liu Feb 17 '17 at 1:21
  • Actually, the times you've represented as "incorrect" are, technically, correct. You aren't changing the DateTimes to UTC... you're just changing the time of each DateTime to get an artificial whole number. Rounding isn't "clunky"... it's exactly the correct approach here because that's what you're doing in your head anyways: you're rounding away the time portion (hours, minutes, seconds) and just trying to get a whole day number. – JDB still remembers Monica Aug 15 '19 at 14:26
115

The easiest way to get the difference between two dates:

var diff =  Math.floor(( Date.parse(str2) - Date.parse(str1) ) / 86400000); 

You get the difference days (or NaN if one or both could not be parsed). The parse date gived the result in milliseconds and to get it by day you have to divided it by 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000

If you want it divided by days, hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds:

function dateDiff( str1, str2 ) {
    var diff = Date.parse( str2 ) - Date.parse( str1 ); 
    return isNaN( diff ) ? NaN : {
        diff : diff,
        ms : Math.floor( diff            % 1000 ),
        s  : Math.floor( diff /     1000 %   60 ),
        m  : Math.floor( diff /    60000 %   60 ),
        h  : Math.floor( diff /  3600000 %   24 ),
        d  : Math.floor( diff / 86400000        )
    };
}

Here is my refactored version of James version:

function mydiff(date1,date2,interval) {
    var second=1000, minute=second*60, hour=minute*60, day=hour*24, week=day*7;
    date1 = new Date(date1);
    date2 = new Date(date2);
    var timediff = date2 - date1;
    if (isNaN(timediff)) return NaN;
    switch (interval) {
        case "years": return date2.getFullYear() - date1.getFullYear();
        case "months": return (
            ( date2.getFullYear() * 12 + date2.getMonth() )
            -
            ( date1.getFullYear() * 12 + date1.getMonth() )
        );
        case "weeks"  : return Math.floor(timediff / week);
        case "days"   : return Math.floor(timediff / day); 
        case "hours"  : return Math.floor(timediff / hour); 
        case "minutes": return Math.floor(timediff / minute);
        case "seconds": return Math.floor(timediff / second);
        default: return undefined;
    }
}
  • 1
    Bad answer. Math.floor() will lose you a day when clocks go forwards in daylight savings. Math.round() will give the right answer in most situations but there's better options in other answer too. – Phil B Aug 29 '18 at 10:40
98

I recommend using the moment.js library (http://momentjs.com/docs/#/displaying/difference/). It handles daylight savings time correctly and in general is great to work with.

Example:

var start = moment("2013-11-03");
var end = moment("2013-11-04");
end.diff(start, "days")
1
  • 10
    Just as a warning while momentjs is great, it is quite a large dependency – Jason Axelson Dec 3 '16 at 0:16
  • It should really be end.diff(start,"days") although the code as written will work because the start date is after the end date! – gordon613 Jun 28 '17 at 11:09
40

I would go ahead and grab this small utility and in it you will find functions to this for you. Here's a short example:

        <script type="text/javascript" src="date.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var minutes = 1000*60;
            var hours = minutes*60;
            var days = hours*24;

            var foo_date1 = getDateFromFormat("02/10/2009", "M/d/y");
            var foo_date2 = getDateFromFormat("02/12/2009", "M/d/y");

            var diff_date = Math.round((foo_date2 - foo_date1)/days);
            alert("Diff date is: " + diff_date );
        </script>
25
const startDate = '2017-11-08';
const endDate   = '2017-10-01';
const timeDiff  = (new Date(startDate)) - (new Date(endDate));
const days      = timeDiff / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)
  1. Set start date
  2. Set end date
  3. Calculate difference
  4. Convert milliseconds to days

Update: I know this is not part of your questions but in general I would not recommend to do any date calculation or manipulation in vanilla JavaScript and rather use a library like date-fns or moment.js for it due to many edge cases.

  • 3
    I appreciate answers like these: short, simple and no random dependencies required! Cheers. – daCoda Jan 24 '19 at 9:10
  • Is it just me that has timeDiffreturned in the negative? Shouldn't timeDiff be (new Date(endDate)) - (new Date(startDate)); ? – Feyisayo Sonubi Aug 4 '19 at 1:17
  • @feyisayo-sonubi depends in which order you pass in you start and end date. In this example (new Date('2017-11-08')) - (new Date('2017-10-01')) // 3283200000 – marcobiedermann Aug 4 '19 at 9:58
13

Using Moment.js

var future = moment('05/02/2015');
var start = moment('04/23/2015');
var d = future.diff(start, 'days'); // 9
console.log(d);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.17.1/moment-with-locales.min.js"></script>

  • moment.js is really handy for things like YTD diff counts var now = moment(), yearStart = moment().startOf('year'); var ytdDays = now.diff(yearStart, 'days'); // this can be years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds console.log(ytdDays); more here: momentjs.com – Sharif Jul 12 '17 at 21:04
10

Date values in JS are datetime values.

So, direct date computations are inconsistent:

(2013-11-05 00:00:00) - (2013-11-04 10:10:10) < 1 day

for example we need to convert de 2nd date:

(2013-11-05 00:00:00) - (2013-11-04 00:00:00) = 1 day

the method could be truncate the mills in both dates:

var date1 = new Date('2013/11/04 00:00:00');
var date2 = new Date('2013/11/04 10:10:10'); //less than 1
var start = Math.floor(date1.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)); //days as integer from..
var end = Math.floor(date2.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)); //days as integer from..
var daysDiff = end - start; // exact dates
console.log(daysDiff);

date2 = new Date('2013/11/05 00:00:00'); //1

var start = Math.floor(date1.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)); //days as integer from..
var end = Math.floor(date2.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)); //days as integer from..
var daysDiff = end - start; // exact dates
console.log(daysDiff);

9

Better to get rid of DST, Math.ceil, Math.floor etc. by using UTC times:

var firstDate = Date.UTC(2015,01,2);
var secondDate = Date.UTC(2015,04,22);
var diff = Math.abs((firstDate.valueOf() 
    - secondDate.valueOf())/(24*60*60*1000));

This example gives difference 109 days. 24*60*60*1000 is one day in milliseconds.

9

To Calculate days between 2 given dates you can use the following code.Dates I use here are Jan 01 2016 and Dec 31 2016

var day_start = new Date("Jan 01 2016");
var day_end = new Date("Dec 31 2016");
var total_days = (day_end - day_start) / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24);
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = Math.round(total_days);
<h3>DAYS BETWEEN GIVEN DATES</h3>
<p id="demo"></p>

9

It is possible to calculate a full proof days difference between two dates resting across different TZs using the following formula:

var start = new Date('10/3/2015');
var end = new Date('11/2/2015');
var days = (end - start) / 1000 / 60 / 60 / 24;
console.log(days);
// actually its 30 ; but due to daylight savings will show 31.0xxx
// which you need to offset as below
days = days - (end.getTimezoneOffset() - start.getTimezoneOffset()) / (60 * 24);
console.log(days);

  • This is the most correct answer, you have to take DST in consideration! Thanks – Gisway Oct 7 '19 at 20:50
6

I found this question when I want do some calculate on two date, but the date have hours and minutes value, I modified @michael-liu 's answer to fit my requirement, and it passed my test.

diff days 2012-12-31 23:00 and 2013-01-01 01:00 should equal 1. (2 hour) diff days 2012-12-31 01:00 and 2013-01-01 23:00 should equal 1. (46 hour)

function treatAsUTC(date) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setMinutes(result.getMinutes() - result.getTimezoneOffset());
    return result;
}

var millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
function diffDays(startDate, endDate) {
    return Math.floor(treatAsUTC(endDate) / millisecondsPerDay) - Math.floor(treatAsUTC(startDate) / millisecondsPerDay);
}
6
var start= $("#firstDate").datepicker("getDate");
var end= $("#SecondDate").datepicker("getDate");
var days = (end- start) / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24);
 alert(Math.round(days));

jsfiddle example :)

6

I think the solutions aren't correct 100% I would use ceil instead of floor, round will work but it isn't the right operation.

function dateDiff(str1, str2){
    var diff = Date.parse(str2) - Date.parse(str1); 
    return isNaN(diff) ? NaN : {
        diff: diff,
        ms: Math.ceil(diff % 1000),
        s: Math.ceil(diff / 1000 % 60),
        m: Math.ceil(diff / 60000 % 60),
        h: Math.ceil(diff / 3600000 % 24),
        d: Math.ceil(diff / 86400000)
    };
}
  • 4
    Days can have more than 24 hours and minutes can have more than 60 seconds. Using Math.ceil() would overcount in these cases. – Rich Dougherty Apr 7 '12 at 22:28
5

What about using formatDate from DatePicker widget? You could use it to convert the dates in timestamp format (milliseconds since 01/01/1970) and then do a simple subtraction.

5

function timeDifference(date1, date2) {
  var oneDay = 24 * 60 * 60; // hours*minutes*seconds
  var oneHour = 60 * 60; // minutes*seconds
  var oneMinute = 60; // 60 seconds
  var firstDate = date1.getTime(); // convert to milliseconds
  var secondDate = date2.getTime(); // convert to milliseconds
  var seconds = Math.round(Math.abs(firstDate - secondDate) / 1000); //calculate the diffrence in seconds
  // the difference object
  var difference = {
    "days": 0,
    "hours": 0,
    "minutes": 0,
    "seconds": 0,
  }
  //calculate all the days and substract it from the total
  while (seconds >= oneDay) {
    difference.days++;
    seconds -= oneDay;
  }
  //calculate all the remaining hours then substract it from the total
  while (seconds >= oneHour) {
    difference.hours++;
    seconds -= oneHour;
  }
  //calculate all the remaining minutes then substract it from the total 
  while (seconds >= oneMinute) {
    difference.minutes++;
    seconds -= oneMinute;
  }
  //the remaining seconds :
  difference.seconds = seconds;
  //return the difference object
  return difference;
}
console.log(timeDifference(new Date(2017,0,1,0,0,0),new Date()));

  • 1
    May I request you to please add some more context around your answer. Code-only answers are difficult to understand. It will help the asker and future readers both if you can add more information in your post. – RBT Jan 22 '17 at 0:13
  • i wanted to edit but i was getting errors i could submit the edit :( . – Noreddine Belhadj Cheikh Jan 22 '17 at 16:15
  • 2
    @N.Belhadj you can replace all those while loops with simple div and mod (%) operations – Mihail Shishkov May 24 '17 at 16:46
4

This may not be the most elegant solution, but it seems to answer the question with a relatively simple bit of code, I think. Can't you use something like this:

function dayDiff(startdate, enddate) {
  var dayCount = 0;

  while(enddate >= startdate) {
    dayCount++;
    startdate.setDate(startdate.getDate() + 1);
  }

return dayCount; 
}

This is assuming you are passing date objects as parameters.

4

Be careful when using milliseconds.

The date.getTime() returns milliseconds and doing math operation with milliseconds requires to include

  • Daylight Saving Time (DST)
  • checking if both dates have the same time (hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds)
  • make sure what behavior of days diff is required: 19 September 2016 - 29 September 2016 = 1 or 2 days difference?

The example from comment above is the best solution I found so far https://stackoverflow.com/a/11252167/2091095 . But use +1 to its result if you want the to count all days involved.

function treatAsUTC(date) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setMinutes(result.getMinutes() - result.getTimezoneOffset());
    return result;
}

function daysBetween(startDate, endDate) {
    var millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
    return (treatAsUTC(endDate) - treatAsUTC(startDate)) / millisecondsPerDay;
}

var diff = daysBetween($('#first').val(), $('#second').val()) + 1;
4

Date.prototype.days = function(to) {
  return Math.abs(Math.floor(to.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)) - Math.floor(this.getTime() / (3600 * 24 * 1000)))
}


console.log(new Date('2014/05/20').days(new Date('2014/05/23'))); // 3 days

console.log(new Date('2014/05/23').days(new Date('2014/05/20'))); // 3 days

3

I had the same issue in Angular. I do the copy because else he will overwrite the first date. Both dates must have time 00:00:00 (obviously)

 /*
* Deze functie gebruiken we om het aantal dagen te bereken van een booking.
* */
$scope.berekenDagen = function ()
{
    $scope.booking.aantalDagen=0;

    /*De loper is gelijk aan de startdag van je reservatie.
     * De copy is nodig anders overschijft angular de booking.van.
     * */
    var loper = angular.copy($scope.booking.van);

    /*Zolang de reservatie beschikbaar is, doorloop de weekdagen van je start tot einddatum.*/
    while (loper < $scope.booking.tot) {
        /*Tel een dag op bij je loper.*/
        loper.setDate(loper.getDate() + 1);
        $scope.booking.aantalDagen++;
    }

    /*Start datum telt natuurlijk ook mee*/
    $scope.booking.aantalDagen++;
    $scope.infomsg +=" aantal dagen: "+$scope.booking.aantalDagen;
};
3

If you have two unix timestamps, you can use this function (made a little more verbose for the sake of clarity):

// Calculate number of days between two unix timestamps
// ------------------------------------------------------------
var daysBetween = function(timeStampA, timeStampB) {
    var oneDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000; // hours * minutes * seconds * milliseconds
    var firstDate = new Date(timeStampA * 1000);
    var secondDate = new Date(timeStampB * 1000);
    var diffDays = Math.round(Math.abs((firstDate.getTime() - secondDate.getTime())/(oneDay)));
    return diffDays;
};

Example:

daysBetween(1096580303, 1308713220); // 2455
3

I used below code to experiment the posting date functionality for a news post.I calculate the minute or hour or day or year based on the posting date and current date.

var startDate= new Date("Mon Jan 01 2007 11:00:00");
var endDate  =new Date("Tue Jan 02 2007 12:50:00");
var timeStart = startDate.getTime();
var timeEnd = endDate.getTime();
var yearStart = startDate.getFullYear();
var yearEnd   = endDate.getFullYear();
if(yearStart == yearEnd)
 {
  var hourDiff = timeEnd - timeStart; 
  var secDiff = hourDiff / 1000;
  var minDiff = hourDiff / 60 / 1000; 
  var hDiff = hourDiff / 3600 / 1000; 
  var myObj = {};
  myObj.hours = Math.floor(hDiff);
  myObj.minutes = minDiff  
  if(myObj.hours >= 24)
   {
    console.log(Math.floor(myObj.hours/24) + "day(s) ago")
   } 
 else if(myObj.hours>0)
  {
   console.log(myObj.hours +"hour(s) ago")
  }
 else
  {
   console.log(Math.abs(myObj.minutes) +"minute(s) ago")
  }
}
else
{
var yearDiff = yearEnd - yearStart;
console.log( yearDiff +" year(s) ago");
}
  • Please explain your code and you solved the problem, just pasting code is considered a bad answer. – Marco Scabbiolo Jul 21 '16 at 13:51
  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Michael Parker Jul 21 '16 at 16:47
  • Thanks @MarcoScabbiolo,@Michael Parker for the comments.Since i am new to Stackoverflow in terms of answering,I was not aware of how the solution should be proivided – Ramees Rahath Jul 22 '16 at 16:07
3

if you wanna have an DateArray with dates try this:

<script>
        function getDates(startDate, stopDate) {
        var dateArray = new Array();
        var currentDate = moment(startDate);
        dateArray.push( moment(currentDate).format('L'));

        var stopDate = moment(stopDate);
        while (dateArray[dateArray.length -1] != stopDate._i) {
            dateArray.push( moment(currentDate).format('L'));
            currentDate = moment(currentDate).add(1, 'days');
        }
        return dateArray;
      }
</script>

DebugSnippet

3

The simple way to calculate days between two dates is to remove both of their time component i.e. setting hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds to 0 and then subtracting their time and diving it with milliseconds worth of one day.

var firstDate= new Date(firstDate.setHours(0,0,0,0));
var secondDate= new Date(secondDate.setHours(0,0,0,0));
var timeDiff = firstDate.getTime() - secondDate.getTime();
var diffDays =timeDiff / (1000 * 3600 * 24);
  • problem with your solution is, you are assuming firstDate and secondDate to be dates which then there is no need to change them to date again, and if they are not date *which are not) you'll get error on setHours. to correct this, you need to move setHours out of new Date – AaA Feb 24 at 3:27
2
function formatDate(seconds, dictionary) {
    var foo = new Date;
    var unixtime_ms = foo.getTime();
    var unixtime = parseInt(unixtime_ms / 1000);
    var diff = unixtime - seconds;
    var display_date;
    if (diff <= 0) {
        display_date = dictionary.now;
    } else if (diff < 60) {
        if (diff == 1) {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.second;
        } else {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.seconds;
        }
    } else if (diff < 3540) {
        diff = Math.round(diff / 60);
        if (diff == 1) {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.minute;
        } else {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.minutes;
        }
    } else if (diff < 82800) {
        diff = Math.round(diff / 3600);
        if (diff == 1) {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.hour;
        } else {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.hours;
        }
    } else {
        diff = Math.round(diff / 86400);
        if (diff == 1) {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.day;
        } else {
            display_date = diff + ' ' + dictionary.days;
        }
    }
    return display_date;
}
2

Simple easy and sophisticated. This function will be called in every 1 sec to update time.

const year = (new Date().getFullYear());
const bdayDate = new Date("04,11,2019").getTime();  //mmddyyyy

// countdown
let timer = setInterval(function() {

// get today's date
const today = new Date().getTime();

// get the difference
const diff = bdayDate - today;

// math
let days = Math.floor(diff / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24));
let hours = Math.floor((diff % (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)) / (1000 * 60 * 60));
let minutes = Math.floor((diff % (1000 * 60 * 60)) / (1000 * 60));
let seconds = Math.floor((diff % (1000 * 60)) / 1000);

}, 1000);
1

A Better Solution by

Ignoring time part

it will return 0 if both the dates are same.

function dayDiff(firstDate, secondDate) {
  firstDate = new Date(firstDate);
  secondDate = new Date(secondDate);
  if (!isNaN(firstDate) && !isNaN(secondDate)) {
    firstDate.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0); //ignore time part
    secondDate.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0); //ignore time part
    var dayDiff = secondDate - firstDate;
    dayDiff = dayDiff / 86400000; // divide by milisec in one day
    console.log(dayDiff);
  } else {
    console.log("Enter valid date.");
  }
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('input[type=datetime]').datepicker({
    dateFormat: "mm/dd/yy",
    changeMonth: true,
    changeYear: true
  });
  $("#button").click(function() {
    dayDiff($('#first').val(), $('#second').val());
  });
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="//code.jquery.com/ui/1.12.1/themes/base/jquery-ui.css">
<script src="//code.jquery.com/ui/1.12.1/jquery-ui.js"></script>

<input type="datetime" id="first" value="12/28/2016" />
<input type="datetime" id="second" value="12/28/2017" />
<input type="button" id="button" value="Calculate">

1

A contribution, for date before 1970-01-01 and after 2038-01-19

function DateDiff(aDate1, aDate2) {
  let dDay = 0;
  this.isBissexto = (aYear) => {
    return (aYear % 4 == 0 && aYear % 100 != 0) || (aYear % 400 == 0);
  };
  this.getDayOfYear = (aDate) => {
    let count = 0;
    for (let m = 0; m < aDate.getUTCMonth(); m++) {
      count += m == 1 ? this.isBissexto(aDate.getUTCFullYear()) ? 29 : 28 : /(3|5|8|10)/.test(m) ? 30 : 31;
    }
    count += aDate.getUTCDate();
    return count;
  };
  this.toDays = () => {
    return dDay;
  };
  (() => {
    let startDate = aDate1.getTime() <= aDate2.getTime() ? new Date(aDate1.toISOString()) : new Date(aDate2.toISOString());
    let endDate = aDate1.getTime() <= aDate2.getTime() ? new Date(aDate2.toISOString()) : new Date(aDate1.toISOString());
    while (startDate.getUTCFullYear() != endDate.getUTCFullYear()) {
      dDay += (this.isBissexto(startDate.getFullYear())? 366 : 365) - this.getDayOfYear(startDate) + 1;
      startDate = new Date(startDate.getUTCFullYear()+1, 0, 1);
    }
    dDay += this.getDayOfYear(endDate) - this.getDayOfYear(startDate);
  })();
}
0
   function validateDate() {
        // get dates from input fields
        var startDate = $("#startDate").val();
        var endDate = $("#endDate").val();
        var sdate = startDate.split("-");
        var edate = endDate.split("-");
        var diffd = (edate[2] - sdate[2]) + 1;
        var leap = [ 0, 31, 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 ];
        var nonleap = [ 0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 ];
        if (sdate[0] > edate[0]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date Year greater than Start Date Year");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else if (sdate[1] > edate[1]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date month greater than Start Date month");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else if (sdate[2] > edate[2]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date greater than Start Date");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else {
            if (sdate[0] / 4 == 0) {
                while (sdate[1] < edate[1]) {
                    diffd = diffd + leap[sdate[1]++];
                }
            } else {
                while (sdate[1] < edate[1]) {
                    diffd = diffd + nonleap[sdate[1]++];
                }
            }
            document.getElementById("numberOfDays").value = diffd;
        }
    }
0

You can use UnderscoreJS for formatting and calculating difference.

Demo https://jsfiddle.net/sumitridhal/8sv94msp/

 var startDate = moment("2016-08-29T23:35:01");
var endDate = moment("2016-08-30T23:35:01");  
  

console.log(startDate);
console.log(endDate);

var resultHours = endDate.diff(startDate, 'hours', true);

document.body.innerHTML = "";
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode(resultHours));
body { white-space: pre; font-family: monospace; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.5.1/moment.min.js"></script>

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