492

For example, given two dates in input boxes:

<input id="first" value="1/1/2000"/>
<input id="second" value="1/1/2001"/>

<script>
  alert(datediff("day", first, second)); // what goes here?
</script>

How do I get the number of days between two dates in JavaScript?

6
  • 11
    99% of the cases where the user asks for "number of days between two dates" what she doesn't understand is that she is trying to compare apples with pears. The problem becomes so simple if asked "How many DATES are there in a DATE RANGE?", Or how many squares I have to cross on the calendar. This leaves off time and daylight saving issues etc etc.The confusion is implied on us because of the datetime data structure which is pure nonsense. There is no such thing as datetime there is date and there is time, two very distinct objects in both nature and behavior May 24 '17 at 17:07
  • For a function that splits the difference into (whole) units of time, use the answer at stackoverflow.com/a/53092438/3787376.
    – Edward
    Oct 31 '18 at 21:58
  • 1
    I feel this question should be deleted or at least marked "avoid" as most of the answers are either incorrect or dependent on various libraries.
    – RobG
    Mar 16 '19 at 22:09
  • @RobG libraries are the only option if JavaScript does not provide a built-in way to do it right.
    – MC Emperor
    Dec 12 '20 at 14:18
  • 1
    @MCEmperor—hardly, the top voted answer is just 3 lines of code, and two of those are for parsing.
    – RobG
    Dec 12 '20 at 14:35

40 Answers 40

1
2
1

A Better Solution by

Ignoring time part

it will return 0 if both the dates are same.

function dayDiff(firstDate, secondDate) {
  firstDate = new Date(firstDate);
  secondDate = new Date(secondDate);
  if (!isNaN(firstDate) && !isNaN(secondDate)) {
    firstDate.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0); //ignore time part
    secondDate.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0); //ignore time part
    var dayDiff = secondDate - firstDate;
    dayDiff = dayDiff / 86400000; // divide by milisec in one day
    console.log(dayDiff);
  } else {
    console.log("Enter valid date.");
  }
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('input[type=datetime]').datepicker({
    dateFormat: "mm/dd/yy",
    changeMonth: true,
    changeYear: true
  });
  $("#button").click(function() {
    dayDiff($('#first').val(), $('#second').val());
  });
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="//code.jquery.com/ui/1.12.1/themes/base/jquery-ui.css">
<script src="//code.jquery.com/ui/1.12.1/jquery-ui.js"></script>

<input type="datetime" id="first" value="12/28/2016" />
<input type="datetime" id="second" value="12/28/2017" />
<input type="button" id="button" value="Calculate">

1

A contribution, for date before 1970-01-01 and after 2038-01-19

function DateDiff(aDate1, aDate2) {
  let dDay = 0;
  this.isBissexto = (aYear) => {
    return (aYear % 4 == 0 && aYear % 100 != 0) || (aYear % 400 == 0);
  };
  this.getDayOfYear = (aDate) => {
    let count = 0;
    for (let m = 0; m < aDate.getUTCMonth(); m++) {
      count += m == 1 ? this.isBissexto(aDate.getUTCFullYear()) ? 29 : 28 : /(3|5|8|10)/.test(m) ? 30 : 31;
    }
    count += aDate.getUTCDate();
    return count;
  };
  this.toDays = () => {
    return dDay;
  };
  (() => {
    let startDate = aDate1.getTime() <= aDate2.getTime() ? new Date(aDate1.toISOString()) : new Date(aDate2.toISOString());
    let endDate = aDate1.getTime() <= aDate2.getTime() ? new Date(aDate2.toISOString()) : new Date(aDate1.toISOString());
    while (startDate.getUTCFullYear() != endDate.getUTCFullYear()) {
      dDay += (this.isBissexto(startDate.getFullYear())? 366 : 365) - this.getDayOfYear(startDate) + 1;
      startDate = new Date(startDate.getUTCFullYear()+1, 0, 1);
    }
    dDay += this.getDayOfYear(endDate) - this.getDayOfYear(startDate);
  })();
}
1

Using moment will be much easier in this case, You could try this:

    let days = moment(yourFirstDateString).diff(moment(yourSecondDateString), 'days');

It will give you integer value like 1,2,5,0etc so you can easily use condition check like:

if(days < 1) {

Also, one more thing is you can get more accurate result of the time difference (in decimals like 1.2,1.5,0.7etc) to get this kind of result use this syntax:

let days = moment(yourFirstDateString).diff(moment(yourSecondDateString), 'days', true);

Let me know if you have any further query

0
   function validateDate() {
        // get dates from input fields
        var startDate = $("#startDate").val();
        var endDate = $("#endDate").val();
        var sdate = startDate.split("-");
        var edate = endDate.split("-");
        var diffd = (edate[2] - sdate[2]) + 1;
        var leap = [ 0, 31, 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 ];
        var nonleap = [ 0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 ];
        if (sdate[0] > edate[0]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date Year greater than Start Date Year");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else if (sdate[1] > edate[1]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date month greater than Start Date month");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else if (sdate[2] > edate[2]) {
            alert("Please enter End Date greater than Start Date");
            document.getElementById("endDate").value = "";
            diffd = "";
        } else {
            if (sdate[0] / 4 == 0) {
                while (sdate[1] < edate[1]) {
                    diffd = diffd + leap[sdate[1]++];
                }
            } else {
                while (sdate[1] < edate[1]) {
                    diffd = diffd + nonleap[sdate[1]++];
                }
            }
            document.getElementById("numberOfDays").value = diffd;
        }
    }
0
0

You can use UnderscoreJS for formatting and calculating difference.

Demo https://jsfiddle.net/sumitridhal/8sv94msp/

 var startDate = moment("2016-08-29T23:35:01");
var endDate = moment("2016-08-30T23:35:01");  
  

console.log(startDate);
console.log(endDate);

var resultHours = endDate.diff(startDate, 'hours', true);

document.body.innerHTML = "";
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode(resultHours));
body { white-space: pre; font-family: monospace; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.5.1/moment.min.js"></script>

0

Bookmarklet version of other answers, prompting you for both dates:

javascript:(function() {
    var d = new Date(prompt("First Date or leave blank for today?") || Date.now());
    prompt("Days Between", Math.round(
        Math.abs(
            (d.getTime() - new Date(prompt("Date 2")).getTime())
                /(24*60*60*1000)
             )
        ));
})();
0

I only got two timestamps in millisecond, so I have to do some extra steps with moment.js to get the days between.

const getDaysDiff = (fromTimestamp, toTimestamp) => {
    // set timezone offset with utcOffset if needed
    let fromDate = moment(fromTimestamp).utcOffset(8);
    let toDate = moment(toTimestamp).utcOffset(8);
    // get the start moment of the day
    fromDate.set({'hour':0, 'minute': 0, 'second': 0, 'millisecond': 0});
    toDate.set({'hour':0, 'minute': 0, 'second': 0, 'millisecond': 0});
    let diffDays = toDate.diff(fromDate, 'days');

    return diffDays;
}

getDaysDiff(1528889400000, 1528944180000)// 1 
0

This answer, based on another one (link at end), is about the difference between two dates.
You can see how it works because it's simple, also it includes splitting the difference into
units of time (a function that I made) and converting to UTC to stop time zone problems.

function date_units_diff(a, b, unit_amounts) {
    var split_to_whole_units = function (milliseconds, unit_amounts) {
        // unit_amounts = list/array of amounts of milliseconds in a
        // second, seconds in a minute, etc., for example "[1000, 60]".
        time_data = [milliseconds];
        for (i = 0; i < unit_amounts.length; i++) {
            time_data.push(parseInt(time_data[i] / unit_amounts[i]));
            time_data[i] = time_data[i] % unit_amounts[i];
        }; return time_data.reverse();
    }; if (unit_amounts == undefined) {
        unit_amounts = [1000, 60, 60, 24];
    };
    var utc_a = new Date(a.toUTCString());
    var utc_b = new Date(b.toUTCString());
    var diff = (utc_b - utc_a);
    return split_to_whole_units(diff, unit_amounts);
}

// Example of use:
var d = date_units_diff(new Date(2010, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0), new Date()).slice(0,-2);
document.write("In difference: 0 days, 1 hours, 2 minutes.".replace(
   /0|1|2/g, function (x) {return String( d[Number(x)] );} ));

How my code above works

A date/time difference, as milliseconds, can be calculated using the Date object:

var a = new Date(); // Current date now.
var b = new Date(2010, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0); // Start of 2010.

var utc_a = new Date(a.toUTCString());
var utc_b = new Date(b.toUTCString());
var diff = (utc_b - utc_a); // The difference as milliseconds.

Then to work out the number of seconds in that difference, divide it by 1000 to convert
milliseconds to seconds, then change the result to an integer (whole number) to remove
the milliseconds (fraction part of that decimal): var seconds = parseInt(diff/1000).
Also, I could get longer units of time using the same process, for example:
- (whole) minutes, dividing seconds by 60 and changing the result to an integer,
- hours, dividing minutes by 60 and changing the result to an integer.

I created a function for doing that process of splitting the difference into
whole units of time, named split_to_whole_units, with this demo:

console.log(split_to_whole_units(72000, [1000, 60]));
// -> [1,12,0] # 1 (whole) minute, 12 seconds, 0 milliseconds.

This answer is based on this other one.

0
0

This is bit different answer if we want to calculate our age

    {
      birthday: 'April 22, 1993',
      names: {
        first: 'Keith',
        last: 'Buckley'
      }
    },
    {
      birthday: 'January 3, 1975',
      names: {
        first: 'Larry',
        last: 'Heep'
      }
    },
    {
      birthday: 'February 12, 1944',
      names: {
        first: 'Linda',
        last: 'Bermeer'
      }
    }
  ];
const cleanPeople = people.map(function ({birthday, names:{first, last}}) {
      // birthday, age, fullName;
      const now = new Date();
      var age =  Math.floor(( Date.parse(now) - Date.parse(birthday)) / 31536000000);
      return {
        age,
        fullName:`${first} ${last}`
      }
    });
    console.log(cleanPeople);
    console.table(cleanPeople);
-3

I had same issue, but it's better if you done it on SQL Query :

DateDiff(DAY, StartValue,GETDATE()) AS CountDays

the query will automatically generate a column CountDays

1
  • The question is specifically in JavaScript (not SQL).
    – stomy
    Dec 2 '20 at 15:21
1
2

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