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I have a working solution for uploading a CSV file. Currently, I use the IFormCollection for a user to upload multiple CSV files from a view.

The CSV files are saved as a temp file as follows:

List<string> fileLocations = new List<string>();
foreach (var formFile in files)
{
   filePath = Path.GetTempFileName();    
   if (formFile.Length > 0)
   {
       using (var stream = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Create))
       {
           await formFile.CopyToAsync(stream);
       }
   }

   fileLocations.Add(filePath);
}

I send the list of file locations to another method (just below). I loop through the file locations and stream the data from the temp files, I then use a data table and SqlBulkCopyto insert the data. I currently upload between 50 and 200 files at a time and each file is around 330KB. To insert a hundred, it takes around 6 minutes, which is around 30-35MB.

public void SplitCsvData(string fileLocation, Guid uid)
        {
            MetaDataModel MetaDatas;
            List<RawDataModel> RawDatas;

            var reader = new StreamReader(File.OpenRead(fileLocation));
            List<string> listRows = new List<string>();
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            {
                listRows.Add(reader.ReadLine());
            }

            var metaData = new List<string>();
            var rawData = new List<string>();

            foreach (var row in listRows)
            {
                var rowName = row.Split(',')[0];
                bool parsed = int.TryParse(rowName, out int result);

                if (parsed == false)
                {
                    metaData.Add(row);
                }
                else
                {
                    rawData.Add(row);
                }
            }

         //Assigns the vertical header name and value to the object by splitting string 
         RawDatas = GetRawData.SplitRawData(rawData);
         SaveRawData(RawDatas);

         MetaDatas = GetMetaData.SplitRawData(rawData);
         SaveRawData(RawDatas);

        }

This code then passes the object to the to create the datatable and insert the data.

private DataTable CreateRawDataTable
{
   get
   {
       var dt = new DataTable();
       dt.Columns.Add("Id", typeof(int));
       dt.Columns.Add("SerialNumber", typeof(string));
       dt.Columns.Add("ReadingNumber", typeof(int));
       dt.Columns.Add("ReadingDate", typeof(string));
       dt.Columns.Add("ReadingTime", typeof(string));
       dt.Columns.Add("RunTime", typeof(string));
       dt.Columns.Add("Temperature", typeof(double));
       dt.Columns.Add("ProjectGuid", typeof(Guid));
       dt.Columns.Add("CombineDateTime", typeof(string));

        return dt;
  }
}

public void SaveRawData(List<RawDataModel> data)
{
       DataTable dt = CreateRawDataTable;
       var count = data.Count;          

       for (var i = 1; i < count; i++)
       {
           DataRow row = dt.NewRow();
           row["Id"] = data[i].Id;
           row["ProjectGuid"] = data[i].ProjectGuid;
           row["SerialNumber"] = data[i].SerialNumber;
           row["ReadingNumber"] = data[i].ReadingNumber;
           row["ReadingDate"] = data[i].ReadingDate;
           row["ReadingTime"] = data[i].ReadingTime;
           row["CombineDateTime"] = data[i].CombineDateTime;
           row["RunTime"] = data[i].RunTime;
           row["Temperature"] = data[i].Temperature;
           dt.Rows.Add(row);
        }

        using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
        {
           conn.Open();
           using (SqlTransaction tr = conn.BeginTransaction())
           {
               using (var sqlBulk = new SqlBulkCopy(conn, SqlBulkCopyOptions.Default, tr))
               {
                   sqlBulk.BatchSize = 1000;
                   sqlBulk.DestinationTableName = "RawData";
                   sqlBulk.WriteToServer(dt);
               }
               tr.Commit();
           }
       }
   }

Is there another way to do this or a better way to improve performance so that the time to upload is reduced as it can take a long time and I am seeing an ever increasing use of memory to around 500MB.

TIA

  • 2
    By getting rid of the datatable. Right now you are loading the entire table in memory, then parsing it and making another copy in memory and only at the end is the table written to the databased. WriteToServer can accept a DbDataReader too. If you find a way to create a data reader on top of the file you'll be able to pump records from the file directly to SqlBulkCopy – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 21 at 16:30
  • 1
    BTW CsvHelper can produce a data reader from any stream reader directly – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 21 at 16:32
  • Don't fill theList<string> but a DataTable directly. If you have a BatchSize in SaveRawData make it a field and check in the while-loop if the the DataTable.Rows.Count==MaxBatchSize. Then you can pass this to SaveRawData. After you have passed it create a new, empty table. On that way you only have in memory what you are currently processing – Tim Schmelter Jan 21 at 16:36
2

You can improve performance by removing the DataTable and reading from the input stream directly.

SqlBulkCopy has a WriteToServer overload that accepts an IDataReader instead of an entire DataTable.

CsvHelper can CSV files using a StreamReader as an input. It provides CsvDataReader as an IDataReader implementation on top of the CSV data. This allows reading directly from the input stream and writing to SqlBulkCopy.

The following method will read from an IFormFile, parse the stream using CsvHelper and use the CSV's fields to configure a SqlBulkCopy instance :

public async Task ToTable(IFormFile file, string table)
{
    using (var stream = file.OpenReadStream())
    using (var tx = new StreamReader(stream))
    using (var reader = new CsvReader(tx))
    using (var rd = new CsvDataReader(reader))
    {
        var headers = reader.Context.HeaderRecord;

        var bcp = new SqlBulkCopy(_connection)
        {
            DestinationTableName = table
        };
        //Assume the file headers and table fields have the same names
        foreach(var header in headers)
        {
            bcp.ColumnMappings.Add(header, header);
        }

        await bcp.WriteToServerAsync(rd);                
    }
}

This way nothing is ever written to a temp table or cached in memory. The uploaded files are parsed and written to the database directly.

  • I have updated part of my question, part of the reason (which I should have said at the start) is I have to split the CSV file into two parts, the first set of rows are metadata and the remaining rows are raw data, these are defined by the raw data rows starting with a number. The headers are vertical and not horizontal. Would this mean I have to save the IFormFile into the two parts to use your solution. – The OrangeGoblin Jan 21 at 18:19
  • 1
    @TheOrangeGoblin that's not a CSV file. That's something completely different and you should explain that in the question, along with a sample of the file. You still don't need the DataTable and multiple in-memory copies. You can make your parser an iterator method and use ObjectReader from the Fast-Member library to make it look like an IDataReader – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 22 at 7:29
  • I tried installing Fast-Member but for some reason it won't work on netcore2.1, the dependencies don't seem to be correct. I've also tried the other methods and it takes just as long, both locally and remotely. Back to the drawing board. – The OrangeGoblin Jan 23 at 18:42
  • 1
    @TheOrangeGoblin it works just fine on .NET Core 2.1, that's what I use right now. it takes just as long then you may have a problem completely unrleated to your code. Copying something 3 times is always slower than not creating any copy at all. Did you try using bcp or BULK INSERT? How fast/slow was it? If bcp is slow, SqlBulkCopy will be slow as well – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 24 at 8:01
  • Thanks, I have managed to get it working because of your input. I have posted the answer to this... – The OrangeGoblin Jan 24 at 15:10
0

In addition to @Panagiotis's answer, why don't you interleave your file processing with the file upload? Wrap up your file processing logic in an async method and change the loop to a Parallel.Foreach and process each file as it arrives instead of waiting for all of them?

private static readonly object listLock = new Object(); // only once at class level


    List<string> fileLocations = new List<string>();
    Parallel.ForEach(files, (formFile) => 
    {
       filePath = Path.GetTempFileName();    
       if (formFile.Length > 0)
       {
           using (var stream = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Create))
           {
               await formFile.CopyToAsync(stream);
           }

           await ProcessFileInToDbAsync(filePath); 
       }

       // Added lock for thread safety of the List 
       lock (listLock)
       {
           fileLocations.Add(filePath);
       }     
    });
  • This doesn't interleave processing. It performs each operation asynchronously but they're still completed one at a time – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 21 at 16:43
  • Tweaked it to be a Parallel.ForEach – Murray Foxcroft Jan 21 at 16:48
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Thanks to @Panagiotis Kanavos, I was able to work out what to do. Firstly, the way I was calling the methods, was leaving them in memory. The CSV file I have is in two parts, vertical metadata and then the usual horizontal information. So I needed to split them into two. Saving them as tmp files was also causing an overhead. It has gone from taking 5-6 minutes to now taking a minute, which for a 100 files containing 8,500 rows isn't bad I suppose.

Calling the method:

public async Task<IActionResult> UploadCsvFiles(ICollection<IFormFile> files, IFormCollection fc)
{
   foreach (var f in files)
   {
       var getData = new GetData(_configuration);
       await getData.SplitCsvData(f, uid);
   }

   return whatever;
}

This is the method doing the splitting:

public async Task SplitCsvData(IFormFile file, string uid)
    {
        var data = string.Empty;
        var m = new List<string>();
        var r = new List<string>();

        var records = new List<string>();
        using (var stream = file.OpenReadStream())
        using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
        {
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            {
                var line = reader.ReadLine();
                var header = line.Split(',')[0].ToString();
                bool parsed = int.TryParse(header, out int result);
                if (!parsed)
                {
                    m.Add(line);
                }
                else
                {
                    r.Add(line);
                }
            }
        }

        //TODO: Validation
        //This splits the list into the Meta data model. This is just a single object, with static fields.
        var metaData = SplitCsvMetaData.SplitMetaData(m, uid);
        DataTable dtm = CreateMetaData(metaData);
        var serialNumber = metaData.LoggerId;
        await SaveMetaData("MetaData", dtm);

        //
        var lrd = new List<RawDataModel>();
        foreach (string row in r)
        {
            lrd.Add(new RawDataModel
            {
                Id = 0,
                SerialNumber = serialNumber,
                ReadingNumber = Convert.ToInt32(row.Split(',')[0]),
                ReadingDate = Convert.ToDateTime(row.Split(',')[1]).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"),
                ReadingTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row.Split(',')[2]).ToString("HH:mm:ss"),
                RunTime = row.Split(',')[3].ToString(),
                Temperature = Convert.ToDouble(row.Split(',')[4]),
                ProjectGuid = uid.ToString(),
                CombineDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row.Split(',')[1] + " " + row.Split(',')[2]).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss")
            });
        }

        await SaveRawData("RawData", lrd);
    }

I then use a data table for the metadata (which takes 20 seconds for a 100 files) as I map the field names to the columns.

 public async Task SaveMetaData(string table, DataTable dt)
    {
        using (SqlBulkCopy sqlBulk = new SqlBulkCopy(_configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection"), SqlBulkCopyOptions.Default))
        { 
            sqlBulk.DestinationTableName = table;
            await sqlBulk.WriteToServerAsync(dt);
        }
    }

I then use FastMember for the large data parts for the raw data, which is more like a traditional CSV.

 public async Task SaveRawData(string table, IEnumerable<LogTagRawDataModel> lrd)
    {
        using (SqlBulkCopy sqlBulk = new SqlBulkCopy(_configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection"), SqlBulkCopyOptions.Default))
        using (var reader = ObjectReader.Create(lrd, "Id","SerialNumber", "ReadingNumber", "ReadingDate", "ReadingTime", "RunTime", "Temperature", "ProjectGuid", "CombineDateTime"))
        {                
            sqlBulk.DestinationTableName = table;
            await sqlBulk.WriteToServerAsync(reader);
        }  
    }

I am sure this can be improved on, but for now, this works really well.

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