14

The following code output endless errors, when a user entered not a number.

Scanner scn = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println("Enter the number: ");   
int n = 0;  
while(true){
    try {
        n = scn.nextInt();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        continue;
    }
    break;
}

I expect that the code wait for new input when user entered not a number.

marked as duplicate by Hulk, Stephen C java Jan 22 at 13:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    try adding a scm.nextLine(); after your scm.nextInt(); call (in your catch as well) – Stultuske Jan 22 at 9:31
  • try putting break after e.printStackTrace() if you want to break after any exception. – Akash Jan 22 at 9:32
  • @Stultuske, wouldn't it work to have scn.nextLine() in a finally{}? (not saying it's a good solution) – Joakim Danielson Jan 22 at 9:46
  • 1
    @JoakimDanielson yes. either in the catch (before the continue; statement, or in a finally should do the trick. But since I didn't see a finally block in the OP's code, I just spotted it in a block he does have. – Stultuske Jan 22 at 9:49
  • Very closely related to stackoverflow.com/questions/1794281/… – Hulk Jan 22 at 10:20
12

From the javadoc,

When a Scanner throws an InputMismatchException, the scanner will not pass the token that caused the exception, so that it may be retrieved or skipped via some other method.

In your case, scn.nextInt() must have thrown InputMismatchException. But the token is not passed (in other words,the input token hangs in there to be passed by Scanner). So on the next iteration of the loop, scn.nextInt() reads the same token again and throws the exception again resulting in an infinite loop.

If you inspect the value of CharBuffer (HeapCharBuffer?) inside the Scanner object, it still contains the input you have typed the first time and causing this issue. Also, you cannot explicitly clear Scanner's buffer.

Also, beware of resource-leaks!

  • 1
    "Also, beware of resource-leaks!" There are no resource leaks in this code. You should close any stream that you open, and haven't handed over ownership of; you didn't open System.in, so you shouldn't close it. – Andy Turner Jan 22 at 13:44
  • Yes, in this case it is perfectly safe not to close since we did not open System.in – Mohamed Anees A Jan 23 at 16:16
3

I would stay away from using nextInt and instead read input as a string and try to convert it afterwards

Scanner scn = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println("Enter the number: ");   
int n = 0;  
while(true) {
    String input = scn.nextLine();

    try {
        n = Integer.valueOf(input);
        break;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println( input + " is not a valid number. Try again.");
    }
}
System.out.println("You entered " + n);
1

My version:

public class IsNumber {
    public static void main(String o[]) {
        Scanner scn = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter the number: ");   
        String str = null;
        do{
            str = scn.next();
            if(isInteger(str))
                break;
        }while(true);

        System.out.println("Number Entered: " + Integer.parseInt(str));
        scn.close();
    }

    private static boolean isInteger(String s) {
        try { 
            Integer.parseInt(s); 
        } catch(Exception e) { 
            return false; 
            }
        return true;
    }
}
  • 2
    This solutions means you are calling parseInt twice – Joakim Danielson Jan 22 at 10:18
  • Only in happy case – abhilash_goyal Jan 22 at 10:23
  • Benefit it serves is modularity of logic – abhilash_goyal Jan 22 at 10:28
  • Could alternatively return Optional<Integer> and avoid the duplicate call. – Ben R. Jan 22 at 11:41
1

In your code sample you continue inside the catch {} block. This will run the loop again because you run the loop indefinitely. In the loop, the same input is validated as before because the scanner will use the same input again, so it will throw the exception again.

This basically happens:

  1. Scanner receives not an integer.
  2. Exception is thrown.
  3. Continue is encountered.
  4. Check loop condition, which is true, so the loop runs again.
  5. Back to step 1.

You could retrieve the input as a string and later verify that it was actually a number.

0

Quick fix

try {
    n = scn.nextInt();
} catch(Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    scn.nextLine(); // <-- add this to move to the next line
    continue;
}
  • 1
    only problem with your code, is that when applied to the wrong scenario, it has the same problem. hiding Exceptions is never a good thing. – Stultuske Jan 22 at 9:44
  • @Stultuske ok, fixed without ignore exception. – oleg.cherednik Jan 22 at 9:55
  • 3
    it's a bit overkill to go that far. all that was needed was to add "scm.nextLine();" to the original code – Stultuske Jan 22 at 9:57
  • 3
    This does not answer the question at all. OP asked why he was getting exceptions with his code and you ended up rewriting it completely using concepts that OP definitely does not know. – nbokmans Jan 22 at 10:02
  • 2
    This is overly complicated. Checking for an exception is way easier and more robust. Now it can happen that isIntegerString returns true while parseInt still throws an exception in case of a too big integer or if you have a bug in isIntegerString. – user42723 Jan 22 at 10:56

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