19

This question already has an answer here:

Problem

I have the requirement to sort a list by a certain property of each object in that list. This is a standard action supported in most languages.

However, there is additional requirement that certain items may depend on others, and as such, must not appear in the sorted list until items they depend on have appeared first, even if this requires going against the normal sort order. Any such item that is 'blocked', should appear in the list the moment the items 'blocking' it have been added to the output list.

An Example

If I have items:

[{'a',6},{'b',1},{'c',5},{'d',15},{'e',12},{'f',20},{'g',14},{'h',7}]

Sorting these normally by the numeric value will get:

[{'b',1},{'c',5},{'a',6},{'h',7},{'e',12},{'g',14},{'d',15},{'f',20}]

However, if the following constraints are enforced:

  • a depends on e
  • g depends on d
  • c depends on b

Then this result is invalid. Instead, the result should be:

[{'b',1},{'c',5},{'h',7},{'e',12},{'a',6},{'d',15},{'g',14},{'f',20}]

Where b, c, d, e, f and h have been sorted in correct order b, c, h, e, d and f; both a and g got delayed until e and d respectively had been output; and c did not need delaying, as the value it depended on, b, had already been output.

What I have already tried

Initially I investigated if this was possible using basic Java comparators, where the comparator implementation was something like:

private Map<MyObject,Set<MyObject>> dependencies; // parent to set of children

public int compare(MyObj x, MyObj y) {
   if (dependencies.get(x).contains(y)) {
      return 1;
   } else if (dependencies.get(y).contains(x)) {
      return -1;
   } else if (x.getValue() < y.getValue()) {
     return -1;
   } else if (x.getValue() > y.getValue()) {
     return 1;
   } else {
     return 0;
   }
}

However this breaks the requirement of Java comparators of being transitive. Taken from the java documentation:

((compare(x, y)>0) && (compare(y, z)>0)) implies compare(x, z)>0.

However, in the above example

  • a(6) < h(7) : true
  • h(7) < e(12) : true
  • a(6) < e(12) : false

Instead, I have come up with the below code, which while works, seems massively over-sized and over-complex for what seems like a simple problem. (Note: This is a slightly cut down version of the class. It can also be viewed and run at https://ideone.com/XrhSeA)

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ListIterator;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Objects;
import java.util.PriorityQueue;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public final class ListManager<ValueType extends Comparable<ValueType>> {
    private static final class ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType> {
        private final ValueType parent;
        private final Set<ValueType> childrenByReference;

        public ParentChildrenWrapper(ValueType parent, Set<ValueType> childrenByReference) {
            this.parent = parent;
            this.childrenByReference = childrenByReference;
        }

        public ValueType getParent() {
            return this.parent;
        }

        public Set<ValueType> getChildrenByReference() {
            return this.childrenByReference;
        }
    }

    private static final class QueuedItem<ValueType> implements Comparable<QueuedItem<ValueType>> {
        private final ValueType item;
        private final int index;

        public QueuedItem(ValueType item, int index) {
            this.item = item;
            this.index = index;
        }

        public ValueType getItem() {
            return this.item;
        }

        public int getIndex() {
            return this.index;
        }

        @Override
        public int compareTo(QueuedItem<ValueType> other) {
            if (this.index < other.index) {
                return -1;
            } else if (this.index > other.index) {
                return 1;
            } else {
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }

    private final Set<ValueType> unsortedItems;
    private final Map<ValueType, Set<ValueType>> dependentsOfParents;

    public ListManager() {
        this.unsortedItems = new HashSet<>();
        this.dependentsOfParents = new HashMap<>();
    }

    public void addItem(ValueType value) {
        this.unsortedItems.add(value);
    }

    public final void registerDependency(ValueType parent, ValueType child) {
        if (!this.unsortedItems.contains(parent)) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unrecognized parent");
        } else if (!this.unsortedItems.contains(child)) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unrecognized child");
        } else if (Objects.equals(parent,child)) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Parent and child are the same");
        } else {
            this.dependentsOfParents.computeIfAbsent(parent, __ -> new HashSet<>()).add(child);
        }
    }

    public List<ValueType> createSortedList() {
        // Create a copy of dependentsOfParents where the sets of children can be modified without impacting the original.
        // These sets will representing the set of children for each parent that are yet to be dealt with, and such sets will shrink as more items are processed.
        Map<ValueType, Set<ValueType>> blockingDependentsOfParents = new HashMap<>(this.dependentsOfParents.size());
        for (Map.Entry<ValueType, Set<ValueType>> parentEntry : this.dependentsOfParents.entrySet()) {
            Set<ValueType> childrenOfParent = parentEntry.getValue();
            if (childrenOfParent != null && !childrenOfParent.isEmpty()) {
                blockingDependentsOfParents.put(parentEntry.getKey(), new HashSet<>(childrenOfParent));
            }
        }

        // Compute a list of which children impact which parents, alongside the set of children belonging to each parent.
        // This will allow a child to remove itself from all of it's parents' lists of blocking children.
        Map<ValueType,List<ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType>>> childImpacts = new HashMap<>();
        for (Map.Entry<ValueType, Set<ValueType>> entry : blockingDependentsOfParents.entrySet()) {
            ValueType parent = entry.getKey();
            Set<ValueType> childrenForParent = entry.getValue();
            ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType> childrenForParentWrapped = new ParentChildrenWrapper<>(parent,childrenForParent);
            for (ValueType child : childrenForParent) {
                childImpacts.computeIfAbsent(child, __ -> new LinkedList<>()).add(childrenForParentWrapped);
            }
        }

        // If there are no relationships, the remaining code can be massively optimised.
        boolean hasNoRelationships = blockingDependentsOfParents.isEmpty();

        // Create a pre-sorted stream of items.
        Stream<ValueType> rankedItemStream = this.unsortedItems.stream().sorted();
        List<ValueType> outputList;
        if (hasNoRelationships) {
            // There are no relationships, and as such, the stream is already in a perfectly fine order.
            outputList = rankedItemStream.collect(Collectors.toList());
        } else {
            Iterator<ValueType> rankedIterator = rankedItemStream.iterator();

            int queueIndex = 0;
            outputList = new ArrayList<>(this.unsortedItems.size());

            // A collection of items that have been visited but are blocked by children, stored in map form for easy deletion.
            Map<ValueType,QueuedItem<ValueType>> lockedItems = new HashMap<>();
            // A list of items that have been freed from their blocking children, but have yet to be processed, ordered by order originally encountered.
            PriorityQueue<QueuedItem<ValueType>> freedItems = new PriorityQueue<>();

            while (true) {
                // Grab the earliest-seen item which was once locked but has now been freed. Otherwise, grab the next unseen item.
                ValueType item;
                boolean mustBeUnblocked;
                QueuedItem<ValueType> queuedItem = freedItems.poll();
                if (queuedItem == null) {
                    if (rankedIterator.hasNext()) {
                        item = rankedIterator.next();
                        mustBeUnblocked = false;
                    } else {
                        break;
                    }
                } else {
                    item = queuedItem.getItem();
                    mustBeUnblocked = true;
                }

                // See if this item has any children that are blocking it from being added to the output list.
                Set<ValueType> childrenWaitingUpon = blockingDependentsOfParents.get(item);
                if (childrenWaitingUpon == null || childrenWaitingUpon.isEmpty()) {
                    // There are no children blocking this item, so start removing it from all blocking lists.

                    // Get a list of all parents that is item was blocking, if there are any.
                    List<ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType>> childImpact = childImpacts.get(item);
                    if (childImpact != null) {
                        // Iterate over all those parents
                        ListIterator<ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType>> childImpactIterator = childImpact.listIterator();
                        while (childImpactIterator.hasNext()) {
                            // Remove this item from that parent's blocking children.
                            ParentChildrenWrapper<ValueType> wrappedParentImpactedByChild = childImpactIterator.next();
                            Set<ValueType> childrenOfParentImpactedByChild = wrappedParentImpactedByChild.getChildrenByReference();
                            childrenOfParentImpactedByChild.remove(item);

                            // Does this parent no longer have any children blocking it?
                            if (childrenOfParentImpactedByChild.isEmpty()) {
                                // Remove it from the children impacts map, to prevent unnecessary processing of a now empty set in future iterations.
                                childImpactIterator.remove();

                                // If this parent was locked, mark it as now freed.
                                QueuedItem<ValueType> freedQueuedItem = lockedItems.remove(wrappedParentImpactedByChild.getParent());
                                if (freedQueuedItem != null) {
                                    freedItems.add(freedQueuedItem);
                                }
                            }
                        }
                        // If there are no longer any parents at all being blocked by this child, remove it from the map.
                        if (childImpact.isEmpty()) {
                            childImpacts.remove(item);
                        }
                    }
                    outputList.add(item);
                } else if (mustBeUnblocked) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException("Freed item is still blocked. This should not happen.");
                } else {
                    // Mark the item as locked.
                    lockedItems.put(item,new QueuedItem<>(item,queueIndex++));
                }
            }

            // Check that all items were processed successfully. Given there is only one path that will add an item to to the output list without an exception, we can just compare sizes.
            if (outputList.size() != this.unsortedItems.size()) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("Could not complete ordering. Are there recursive chains of items?");
            }
        }
        return outputList;
    }
}

My question

Is there an already existing algorithm, or an algorithm significantly shorter than the above, that will allow this to be done?

While the language I am developing in is Java, and the code above is in Java, language-independent answers that I could implement in Java are also fine.

marked as duplicate by kfx, Blastfurnace, David Z, Prune, pnuts Jan 22 at 23:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    @kfx While the solution to the linked question does provide example code that provides a solution to this question, I do not believe my question to be a duplicate. People searching for that question already know they want a topological sort. People who encounter this question in the future (and indeed, myself when I wrote it) do not know what they need is a topological sort. – Scott Dennison Jan 22 at 12:35
  • 1
    I would like to challenge the title - you aren't sorting and ignoring the sort order. Instead, the real sort order is different to the one you might naturally go for - in this case, alphabetical. So, really - you are following the sort order. – VLAZ Jan 22 at 13:27
  • 6
    @ScottDennison: In that case your question will still be here as a “sign post” to direct them to the linked question. :-) – David Foerster Jan 22 at 13:50
  • @DavidFoerster I was unable to find out if marking a question as duplicate removes it from search results. If this is not the case, then marking it as a duplicate may be appropriate. – Scott Dennison Jan 22 at 14:32
  • @vlaz I do believe you ARE ignoring the otherwise desired sort order for items that are blocked, however my title is slightly ambiguous, and as such, I have slightly edited it. – Scott Dennison Jan 22 at 14:32
29

This is called topological sorting. You can model "blocking" as edges of a directed graph. This should work if there are no circular "blockings".

  • 3
    I will look into topological sorting (something I had never heard of before today) and associated algorithms, as this sounds like exactly what I need, albeit with the caveat that I am not currently representing my items as a directed graph. In addition, I can confirm that in my use case, circular/recursive blockings are invalid. I will leave this question open for a day or so in-case there are further answers. If not, I will mark this answer as accepted. – Scott Dennison Jan 22 at 12:15
  • Adding a specification to this (absolutely correct) answer: to complete the algorithm you require, you can topologically order the items, then pick the first non-blocked (i.e. without an incoming edge) item following your sorting order. This will unlock some other items, which you can add to the pool of the non-blocked, and so on. – Marco Capitani Jan 22 at 16:10
3

I've done this in <100 lines of c# code (with comments). This implementation seems a little complicated.

Here is the outline of the algorithm

  1. Create a priority queue that is keyed by value that you want to sort by
  2. Insert all the items that do not have any "blocking" connections incoming
  3. While there are elements in the queue:
    1. Take an element of the queue. Put it in your resulting list.
    2. If there are any elements that were being directly blocked by this element and were not visited previously, put them into the queue (an element can have more than one blocking element, so you check for that)

A list of unprocessed elements should be empty at the end, or you had a cycle in your dependencies.

This is essentialy Topological sort with built in priority for nodes. Keep in mind that the result can be quite suprising depending on the number of connections in your graph (ex. it's possible to actually get elements that are in reverse order).

  • Unless I am missing something, this appears to be similar to what I already do, baring in mind that you need to build up the data structure that allows you to execute step #3.2, which is skipped in that list.The only significant difference I can see is that instead of pre-finding blocked items, and then iterating over the rest in a priority queue. I sort all items without using a priority queue, then identify blocked items as I go along, only putting blocked items into the priority queue. I would be interested in seeing the source to see how you achieved such a reduction in lines. – Scott Dennison Jan 22 at 14:39
  • 1
    @Scott Dennison The key trick is not to build any datastructure for tracking already visited connected nodes. You just need to keep track of indegree of a node (number of unvisited neightbours). You decrement it by one every time you remove a connected node from the queue. Once InDegree goes to zero, you know nothing is blocking the node anymore. – ghord Jan 23 at 6:48
3

As Pratik Deoghare stated in their answer, you can use topological sorting. You can view your "dependencies" as arcs of a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). The restriction that the dependencies on the objects are acyclic is important as topological sorting is only possible "if and only if the graph has no directed cycles." The dependencies also of course don't make sense otherwise (i.e. a depends on b and b depends on a doesn't make sense because this is a cyclic dependency).

Once you do topological sorting, the graph can be interpreted as having "layers". To finish the solution, you need to sort within these layers. If there are no dependencies in the objects, this leads to there being just one layer where all the nodes in the DAG are on the same layer and then they are sorted based on their value.

The overall running time is still O(n log n) because topological sorting is O(n) and sorting within the layers is O(n log n). See topological sorting wiki for full running time analysis.

3

Since you said any language that could be converted to Java, I've done a combination of [what I think is] your algorithm and ghord's in C.

A lot of the code is boilerplate to handle arrays, searches, and array/list insertions that I believe can be reduced by using standard Java primitives. Thus, the amount of actual algorithm code is fairly small.

The algorithm I came up with is:

Given: A raw list of all elements and a dependency list

Copy elements that depend on another element to a "hold" list. Otherwise, copy them to a "sort" list.

Note: an alternative is to only use the sort list and just remove the nodes that depend on another to the hold list.

Sort the "sort" list.

For all elements in the dependency list, find the corresponding nodes in the sort list and the hold list. Insert the hold element into the sort list after the corresponding sort element.


Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// sort node definition
typedef struct {
    int key;
    int val;
} Node;

// dependency definition
typedef struct {
    int keybef;                         // key of node that keyaft depends on
    int keyaft;                         // key of node to insert
} Dep;

// raw list of all nodes
Node rawlist[] = {
    {'a',6},  // depends on e
    {'b',1},
    {'c',5},  // depends on b
    {'d',15},
    {'e',12},
    {'f',20},
    {'g',14},  // depends on d
    {'h',7}
};

// dependency list
Dep deplist[] = {
    {'e','a'},
    {'b','c'},
    {'d','g'},
    {0,0}
};

#define MAXLIST     (sizeof(rawlist) / sizeof(rawlist[0]))

// hold list -- all nodes that depend on another
int holdcnt;
Node holdlist[MAXLIST];

// sort list -- all nodes that do _not_ depend on another
int sortcnt;
Node sortlist[MAXLIST];

// prtlist -- print all nodes in a list
void
prtlist(Node *node,int nodecnt,const char *tag)
{

    printf("%s:\n",tag);
    for (;  nodecnt > 0;  --nodecnt, ++node)
        printf("  %c:%d\n",node->key,node->val);
}

// placenode -- put node into hold list or sort list
void
placenode(Node *node)
{
    Dep *dep;
    int holdflg;

    holdflg = 0;

    // decide if node depends on another
    for (dep = deplist;  dep->keybef != 0;  ++dep) {
        holdflg = (node->key == dep->keyaft);
        if (holdflg)
            break;
    }

    if (holdflg)
        holdlist[holdcnt++] = *node;
    else
        sortlist[sortcnt++] = *node;
}

// sortcmp -- qsort compare function
int
sortcmp(const void *vlhs,const void *vrhs)
{
    const Node *lhs = vlhs;
    const Node *rhs = vrhs;
    int cmpflg;

    cmpflg = lhs->val - rhs->val;

    return cmpflg;
}

// findnode -- find node in list that matches the given key
Node *
findnode(Node *node,int nodecnt,int key)
{

    for (;  nodecnt > 0;  --nodecnt, ++node) {
        if (node->key == key)
            break;
    }

    return node;
}

// insert -- insert hold node into sorted list at correct spot
void
insert(Node *sort,Node *hold)
{
    Node prev;
    Node next;
    int sortidx;

    prev = *sort;
    *sort = *hold;

    ++sortcnt;

    for (;  sort < &sortlist[sortcnt];  ++sort) {
        next = *sort;
        *sort = prev;
        prev = next;
    }
}

int
main(void)
{
    Node *node;
    Node *sort;
    Node *hold;
    Dep *dep;

    prtlist(rawlist,MAXLIST,"RAW");

    printf("DEP:\n");
    for (dep = deplist;  dep->keybef != 0;  ++dep)
        printf("  %c depends on %c\n",dep->keyaft,dep->keybef);

    // place nodes into hold list or sort list
    for (node = rawlist;  node < &rawlist[MAXLIST];  ++node)
        placenode(node);
    prtlist(sortlist,sortcnt,"SORT");
    prtlist(holdlist,holdcnt,"HOLD");

    // sort the "sort" list
    qsort(sortlist,sortcnt,sizeof(Node),sortcmp);
    prtlist(sortlist,sortcnt,"SORT");

    // add nodes from hold list to sort list
    for (dep = deplist;  dep->keybef != 0;  ++dep) {
        printf("inserting %c after %c\n",dep->keyaft,dep->keybef);
        sort = findnode(sortlist,sortcnt,dep->keybef);
        hold = findnode(holdlist,holdcnt,dep->keyaft);
        insert(sort,hold);
        prtlist(sortlist,sortcnt,"POST");
    }

    return 0;
}

Here's the program output:

RAW:
  a:6
  b:1
  c:5
  d:15
  e:12
  f:20
  g:14
  h:7
DEP:
  a depends on e
  c depends on b
  g depends on d
SORT:
  b:1
  d:15
  e:12
  f:20
  h:7
HOLD:
  a:6
  c:5
  g:14
SORT:
  b:1
  h:7
  e:12
  d:15
  f:20
inserting a after e
POST:
  b:1
  h:7
  e:12
  a:6
  d:15
  f:20
inserting c after b
POST:
  b:1
  c:5
  h:7
  e:12
  a:6
  d:15
  f:20
inserting g after d
POST:
  b:1
  c:5
  h:7
  e:12
  a:6
  d:15
  g:14
  f:20
1

I think you are generally on the right track, and the core concept behind your solution is similar to the one I will post below. The general algorithm is as follows:

  1. Create a map that associates each item to the items that depend upon it.
  2. Insert elements with no dependencies into a heap.
  3. Remove the top element from the heap.
  4. Subtract 1 from dependency count of each dependent of the element.
  5. Add any elements with a dependency count of zero to the heap.
  6. Repeat from step 3 until the heap is empty.

For simplicity I have replaced your ValueType with a String, but the same concepts apply.

The BlockedItem class:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class BlockedItem implements Comparable<BlockedItem> {

    private String value;
    private int index;
    private List<BlockedItem> dependentUpon;
    private int dependencies;

    public BlockedItem(String value, int index){
        this.value = value;
        this.index = index;
        this.dependentUpon = new ArrayList<>();
        this.dependencies = 0;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public List<BlockedItem> getDependentUpon() {
        return dependentUpon;
    }

    public void addDependency(BlockedItem dependentUpon) {
        this.dependentUpon.add(dependentUpon);
        this.dependencies++;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(BlockedItem other){
        return this.index - other.index;
    }

    public int countDependencies() {
        return dependencies;
    }

    public int subtractDependent(){
        return --this.dependencies;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString(){
        return "{'" + this.value + "', " + this.index + "}";
    }

}

The BlockedItemHeapSort class:

import java.util.*;

public class BlockedItemHeapSort {

    //maps all blockedItems to the blockItems which depend on them
    private static Map<String, Set<BlockedItem>> generateBlockedMap(List<BlockedItem> unsortedList){
        Map<String, Set<BlockedItem>> blockedMap = new HashMap<>();
        //initialize a set for each element
        unsortedList.stream().forEach(item -> {
            Set<BlockedItem> dependents = new HashSet<>();
            blockedMap.put(item.getValue(), dependents);
                });
        //place each element in the sets corresponding to its dependencies
        unsortedList.stream().forEach(item -> {
            if(item.countDependencies() > 0){
                item.getDependentUpon().stream().forEach(dependency -> blockedMap.get(dependency.getValue()).add(item));
            }
        });
        return blockedMap;
    }

    public static List<BlockedItem> sortBlockedItems(List<BlockedItem> unsortedList){
        List<BlockedItem> sorted = new ArrayList<>();
        Map<String, Set<BlockedItem>> blockedMap = generateBlockedMap(unsortedList);

        PriorityQueue<BlockedItem> itemHeap = new PriorityQueue<>();

        //put elements with no dependencies in the heap
        unsortedList.stream().forEach(item -> {
            if(item.countDependencies() == 0) itemHeap.add(item);
        });

        while(itemHeap.size() > 0){
            //get the top element
            BlockedItem item = itemHeap.poll();
            sorted.add(item);
            //for each element that depends upon item, decrease its dependency count
            //if it has a zero dependency count after subtraction, add it to the heap
            if(!blockedMap.get(item.getValue()).isEmpty()){
                blockedMap.get(item.getValue()).stream().forEach(dependent -> {
                    if(dependent.subtractDependent() == 0) itemHeap.add(dependent);
                });
            }
        }

        return sorted;
    }

}

You can modify this to more closely fit your use-case.

0

Java Code for topological sort:

static List<ValueType> topoSort(List<ValueType> vertices) {
        List<ValueType> result = new ArrayList<>();
        List<ValueType> todo = new LinkedList<>();

        Collections.sort(vertices);
        for (ValueType v : vertices){
            todo.add(v);
        }

        outer:
        while (!todo.isEmpty()) {
            for (ValueType r : todo) {
                if (!hasDependency(r, todo)) {
                    todo.remove(r);
                    result.add(r);
                    // no need to worry about concurrent modification
                    continue outer;
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    static boolean hasDependency(ValueType r, List<ValueType> todo) {
        for (ValueType c : todo) {
            if (r.getDependencies().contains(c))
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

ValueType is described like below:

class ValueType implements Comparable<ValueType> {
    private Integer index;
    private String value;
    private List<ValueType> dependencies;

    public ValueType(int index, String value, ValueType...dependencies){
        this.index = index;
        this.value = value;
        this.dependencies = dependencies==null?null:Arrays.asList(dependencies);
    }

    public List<ValueType> getDependencies() {
        return dependencies;
    }

    public void setDependencies(List<ValueType> dependencies) {
        this.dependencies = dependencies;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(@NotNull ValueType o) {
        return this.index.compareTo(o.index);
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return value +"(" + index +")";
    }
}

And tested with these values:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    //[{'a',6},{'b',1},{'c',5},{'d',15},{'e',12},{'f',20},{'g',14},{'h',7}]
    //a depends on e
    //g depends on d
    //c depends on b
    ValueType b = new ValueType(1,"b");
    ValueType c = new ValueType(5,"c", b);
    ValueType d = new ValueType(15,"d");
    ValueType e = new ValueType(12,"e");
    ValueType a = new ValueType(6,"a", e);
    ValueType f = new ValueType(20,"f");
    ValueType g = new ValueType(14,"g", d);
    ValueType h = new ValueType(7,"h");
    List<ValueType> valueTypes = Arrays.asList(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h);
    List<ValueType> r = topoSort(valueTypes);
    for(ValueType v: r){
        System.out.println(v);
    }
}

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